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Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 315

by f3rret (#49188849) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

p>Anything that would leave spaceflight-capable civilization standing would also leave Earth better suited for food production than the Moon. It's an absurd premise....

To be fair, the human race in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is barely spaceflight capable, the can do bulk travel to the moon, but that is about it.

Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 315

by f3rret (#49188825) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

IIRC parts of Earth were - notably India (and China?), where the populations were too large to otherwise sustain.

The Lunar colonies began as a ginormous prison, but the expense of sending parolees and ex-cons home was too onerous; so they stayed, formed their own society, and grew on their own.

I think the premise is still quite doable, especially if there were some condition on Earth which prevented agricultural production from reaching its current capacity.

The "Lunies" couldn't return home because of physiological changes brought on by the Lunar gravity.

Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 315

by f3rret (#49188755) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

I understood the society that Heinlein was trying to convey in Starship Troopers and A Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, but I also see they're completely impossible. The notion that they're militaristic or fascist is the most logical jump people make in order to make the society fit in with reality. It's a disconnect that breaks suspension of belief, so in order to restore the suspension of belief people's brain makes the connection to systems of governance that do fit. This is pretty much the only thing that turns me off reading more Heinlein.

I'll grant you that the society depicted in SST was, in many ways, rather incredible (as in "not credible"), but I always found the society depicted The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress rather credible, given the circumstances it happened in. I mean the "We either make this work, or we all die"-angle on the whole thing, makes it more credible than the SST society.

Comment: Re:Not all libertarians against safety net ... (Score 1) 315

by f3rret (#49188547) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

"The libertarians advocate electing people who are more modest in those determination, who provide for actual needs of citizens, who don't provide mere wants as a mechanism to win favor and re-election."

Not only that, but libertarian leaders all have perfect pitch, play multiple musical instruments, speak multiple languages, can sing, dance, paint, juggle, know higher math, engineering (civil, electrical, chemical, computer), farming, veterinary science, medicine, surgery, and psychiatry. They're also perfect physical specimens, have movie star good looks, excel at all sports, know martial arts, ride horses, are expert with all kinds of guns, know how to build and use archaic weapons, and know military tactics and strategy. They are gourmet chefs. They never have bad breath, body odor, or fart.

In fact, their shit doesn't even stink. Perfect humans, just like you.

You seem angry dude.

Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 315

by f3rret (#49188359) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

Many of his books also featured communal living, with many people living together and freely sharing resources, and even sharing sexual partners. Usually this was not part of the main plot, but just happened to be the way the characters were living.

This sorta thing was actually quite common in sci-fi from that era, Clarke's works also commonly included references to alternative versions of marriage. "Rendevouz With Rama" has numerous references to polygamy and triplet marriages.

Comment: Re:So this is why I've been wanting to write ... (Score 1) 119

by f3rret (#49171267) Attached to: Google Backs Off Default Encryption on New Android Lollilop Devices

And then you're required to hand over the password, or they arrest you.

"You have the right to remain silent", you cannot be compelled into testifying or giving testimony.

I think it's the Fifth constitutional amendment, but what do I know. We have the same rights here in Denmark.
Granted a refusal to testify might be construed as an indication of guilt in and of itself.

Comment: Re:When did facebook become a right? (Score 1) 176

I don't see why inmates need access to it at all. They can find plenty of other ways to not be productive.

It's not a question of Facebook or whatever being a "right", it is about the punishment for using Facebook is out of proportion to the violation.

Comment: Re:Evil Web? (Score 1) 79

by f3rret (#49029799) Attached to: The Dark Web Still Thrives After Silk Road

Dark Web has always been the 'secret' side of the 'net. It just used to be more interesting,

Not really; we just used to be younger and more impressionable.

Well "back in the day" as it were, a Dark Net used to require you to basically set up a whole separate network infrastructure inside the World Wide Web, which I think is kinda cooler than the "everybody join in"-way of TOR.

Those old school darknets also used to be *way* more exclusive.

Some people have a great ambition: to build something that will last, at least until they've finished building it.

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