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Google

Google May Try To Recruit You For a Job Based On Your Search Queries 106

HughPickens.com writes: If Google sees that you're searching for specific programming terms, they may ask you to apply for a job as Max Rossett writes that three months ago while working on a project, he Googled "python lambda function list comprehension." The familiar blue links appeared on the search page, and he started to look for the most relevant one. But then something unusual happened. The search results split and folded back to reveal a box that said "You're speaking our language. Up for a challenge?" Clicking on the link took Rossett to a page called "foo.bar" that outlined a programming challenge and gave instructions on how to submit his solution. "I had 48 hours to solve it, and the timer was ticking," writes Rossett. "I had the option to code in Python or Java. I set to work and solved the first problem in a couple hours. Each time I submitted a solution, foo.bar tested my code against five hidden test cases."

After solving another five problems the page gave Rossett the option to submit his contact information and much to his surprise, a recruiter emailed him a couple days later asking for a copy of his resume. Three months after the mysterious invitation appeared, Rossett started at Google. Apparently Google has been using this recruiting tactic for some time.

Submission + - Canadian accident study puts risks into perspective->

An anonymous reader writes: A Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) study has concluded that there would be no detectable increase in cancer risk for most of the population from radiation released in a hypothetical severe nuclear accident.

The CNSC's dtudy is the result of a collaborative effort of research and analysis undertaken to address concerns raised during public hearings on the environmental assessment for the refurbishment of Ontario Power Generation's (OPG's) Darlington nuclear power plant in 2012. The draft study was released for public consultation in June 2014. Feedback from the Commission itself and comments from over 500 submissions from the public, government and other organizations have been incorporated in the final version.

The study involved identifying and modelling a large atmospheric release of radionuclides from a hypothetical severe nuclear accident at the four-unit Darlington plant

Link to Original Source
NASA

NASA Scientists Paint Stark Picture of Accelerating Sea Level Rise 192

A NASA panel yesterday announced widely reported finding that global sea levels have risen about three inches since 1992, and that these levels are expected to keep rising as much as several more feet over the next century -- on the upper end of model-based predictions that have been made so far. From the Sydney Morning Herald piece linked above: NASA says Greenland has lost an average of 303 gigatons [of ice] yearly for the past decade. Since it takes 360 gigatons to raise sea level by a millimetre, that would suggest Greenland has done this about eight times over just in the last 10 years or so. "People need to be prepared for sea level rise," said Joshua Willis, an oceanographer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. "It's not going to stop."

Submission + - Book review: Effective Python (59 specific ways to write better Python)

MassDosage writes: If you are familiar with the “Effective” style of books then you probably already know how this book is structured. If not here’s a quick primer: the book consists of a number of small sections each of which focus on a specific problem, issue or idea and these are discussed in a “here’s the best way to do X” manner. These sections are grouped into related chapters but can be read in pretty much any order and generally don’t depend on each other (and when they do this will be called out in the text). The idea is that you can read the book from cover to cover if you want but you can also just dip in and out and read only the sections that are of interest to you. This also means that you can use the book as a reference in future when you inevitably forget the details or want to double check something.

Effective Python stays true to this ethos and delivers 59 (not 60, nope, not 55) but 59 specific ways to write better Python. These are logically grouped into chapters covering broader conceptual topics like “Pythonic thinking”, general technical features like “Concurrency and parallelism” as well as nitty gritty language details like “Meta classes and attributes”. The range of topics is excellent and cover relevant aspects of the language that I’d imagine pretty much any developer will encounter at some point while developing Python programs. Even though there is no required order to reading the various sections if you want to read the book from cover to cover it’s organised in such a way that you can do this. It starts off with getting your head around coding in Python before moving on to specifics of the language and then ending with advice on collaboration and setting up and running Python programs in production environments.

I really enjoyed the author’s approach to each of the topics covered. He explains each item in a very thorough and considered manner with plenty of detail but manages to do this while still being clear and concise. Where relevant he describes multiple ways of achieving a goal while contrasting the pros and cons of various alternative solutions, ending off with what he considers the preferred approach. The reader can then make up their own mind based on the various options which applies best in a given situation instead of just being given one solution. The author clearly understand the internals of the Python language and the philosophy behind some of the design decisions that have resulted in certain features. This means that instead of just offering a solution he also gives you the context and reasoning behind things which I found made it a lot easier to understand. The discussions and reasoning feel balanced and informed by the experience of a developer who has been doing this “in the trenches” for years as opposed to someone in an ivory tower issuing dictats which sound good in theory but don’t actually work in the real world. The vast majority of the topics are illustrated through code samples which are built on and modified at each stage along the way to a final solution. This gives the reader something practical they can take away and use and experiment with and clearly shows how something is done. The code samples are easily comprehensible with just enough code to demonstrate a point but not so much that you get distracted by unnecessary additions.

While most of the topics are Python specific plenty of the best practices and advice apply equally well to other programming languages. For example in one section the author recommends resisting some of the brevity offered by the Python where this can lead to unreadable code that is hard to understand but the same could be said of writing code in many other languages (I’m looking at you, Perl). This also applies to a section related to choosing the best data structure for the problem at hand — if you end up nesting Maps within Maps in your code then you’re probably doing something wrong regardless of the language. Still, the main focus here is Python and the author does not shy away from going deep into technical details so you’ll definitely need some knowledge of the language and ideally some experience using it in order to get the most out of it.

Effective Python is not a book for complete newbies to Python and I think it’s suited more to intermediate users of the language wanting to take their skills to the next level or advanced programmers who might need some fresh takes on the way they do things. The subjects and opinions in this book could either convince you to do something differently or reassure you of the reasons why you’re already doing things a certain way (external affirmation that you’re right is also useful at times!) I’m no Python expert but I found the book drew me in and kept my attention and I certainly learnt a lot which will come in handy the next time I put on my Pythonista hat and do some Python coding. Highly recommended.

Full disclosure: I was given a copy of this book free of charge by the publisher for review purposes. They placed no restrictions on what I could say and left me to be as critical as I wanted so the above review is my own honest opinion.

Submission + - Google May Try to Recruit You for a Job Depending on What You Search For

HughPickens.com writes: If Google sees that you're searching for specific programming terms, they may ask you to apply for a job as Max Rossett writes that three months ago while working on a project, he Googled “python lambda function list comprehension.” The familiar blue links appeared on the search page, and he started to look for the most relevant one. But then something unusual happened. The search results split and folded back to reveal a box that said “You’re speaking our language. Up for a challenge?” Clicking on the link took Rossett to a page called "foo.bar" that outlined a programming challenge and gave instructions on how to submit his solution. "I had 48 hours to solve it, and the timer was ticking," writes Rossett. "I had the option to code in Python or Java. I set to work and solved the first problem in a couple hours. Each time I submitted a solution, foo.bar tested my code against five hidden test cases."

After solving another five problems the page gave Rossett the option to submit his contact information and much to his surprise, a recruiter emailed him a couple days later asking for a copy of his resume. Three months after the mysterious invitation appeared, Rossett started at Google. Apparently Google has been using this recruiting tactic for some time. "Foo.bar is a brilliant recruiting tactic," concludes Rossett. "Overall, I enjoyed the puzzles that they gave me to solve, and I’m excited for my first day as a Googler."

Feed Google News Sci Tech: NASA scientists warn of accelerating sea level rise as ice sheets melt - Mashable->


TIME

NASA scientists warn of accelerating sea level rise as ice sheets melt
Mashable
Heavy crevassing near the coast of Melville Bay in west Greenland in May 2015. These cracks are essentially stretch marks on the ice. They occur here because the ice is accelerating as it flows toward the coast. Image: (Rex Features via AP...
Rising seas even more dangerous than thought, says NASAChristian Science Monitor
Earth Is Probably Locked Into at Least Three Feet of Sea Level RiseGizmodo
NASA: Satellite measurements show sea levels' rapid riseChron.com
Science World Report-Sci-Tech Today-Gant Daily
all 213 news articles

Link to Original Source
Cellphones

Former Apple CEO Creates an iPhone Competitor 91

An anonymous reader links to Fast Company's profile of Obi Worldphone, one-time Apple CEO John Sculley's venture into smartphones. The company's first two products (both reasonably spec'd, moderately priced Android phones) are expected to launch in October. And though the phones are obviously running a different operating system than Apple's, Sculley says that Obi is a similarly design-obsessed company: "The hardest part of the design was not coming up with cool-looking designs," Sculley says. "It was sweating the details over in the Chinese factories, who just were not accustomed to having this quality of finish, all of these little details that make a beautiful design. We had teams over in China, working for months on the floor every day. We intend to continue that process and have budgeted accordingly." Obi is also trying to set itself apart from the low-price pack by cutting deals for premium parts. "Instead of going directly to the Chinese factories, we went to the key component vendors, because we know that ecosystem and have the relationships," Sculley says. "We went to Sony. It’s struggling and losing money on its smartphone business, but they make the best camera modules in the world."
Communications

A "Public Health" Approach To Internet of Things Security 35

New submitter StewBeans writes: Guaranteeing your personal privacy in an era when more and more devices are connecting our daily lives to the Internet is becoming increasingly difficult to do. David Bray, CIO of the FCC, emphasizes the exponential growth we are facing by comparing the Internet we know today to a beachball, and the Internet of Everything future to the Sun. Bray says unless you plan to unplug from the Internet completely, every consumer needs to assume some responsibility for the security and overall health of the Internet of Everything. He says this might look similar to public health on the consumer side — the digital equivalent of hand washing — and involve an open, opt-in model for the rapid detection of abnormal trends across global organizations and networks.
Communications

Docs: Responding To Katrina, FBI Made Cell Phone Surveillance Its Priority 71

v3rgEz writes: There's a lot of lessons that the federal government should have learned in the aftermath of Katrina. Increased domestic surveillance, however, appears to be the one the FBI took to heart, using the natural disaster as a justification for ramping up its use of Stingray cell phone tracking throughout Louisiana after the storm, according to documents released under FOIA to MuckRock.
Software

Open Source, Collaborative Rich-Text, Web-Based Editor Almost Available 45

johanneswilm writes: Open source web-based editors such as CKEditor and TinyMCE have been available for more than a decade, and some closed source collaborative editors such as Google Docs have been available since 2007. Creating open source, collaborative, rich-text, web-based editors has proven difficult due to lack of standardization of the lower-level browser features. Now Marijn Haverbeke, the developer behind the popular CodeMirror has started such an editor, called Prosemirror, financed through a crowd-funding campaign. Meanwhile the W3C has installed a task force to rapidly standardize and fix the features needed in browsers to easily create richtext and semantic editors.

Submission + - Annuo App Tracks Sexual Consent

PvtVoid writes: In what has to be one of the creepiest developments ever, Annuo is an app for iPhone, Windows Phone, and Android which allows partners to register sexual consent. From the app's description on Google Play:

1) Register with Annuo or sign-in with Facebook.
2) You input the name of your prospective partner
3) You and your partner may record consent with your voices or sign off on consent
4) You may get a reward offer for getting consent
5) A history of your encounters, partners, and contracts are stored on our database, you can see them on your phone.

Never mind that this probably has no legal bearing, since consent can be withdrawn at any time, but, really, what could possibly be the downside of signing up for an app that keeps track of every time you have sex, and with whom?
Government

Kansas Secretary of State Blocks Release of Voting Machine Tapes 228

PvtVoid writes: Wichita State University statistician Beth Clarkson has filed a lawsuit under Kansas' open records law to force the state to release paper tape records from voting machines, to be used as data in her research on statistical anomalies in voting patterns in the state. Clarkson, a certified quality engineer with a Ph.D. in statistics, has analyzed election returns in Kansas and elsewhere over several elections that indicate 'a statistically significant' pattern where the percentage of Republican votes increase the larger the size of the precinct. The pattern could be voter fraud or a demographic trend that has not been picked up by extensive polling. Secretary of State Kris Kobach argued that the records sought by Clarkson are not subject to the Kansas open records act, and that their disclosure is prohibited by Kansas statute.

Submission + - Learn FPGAs with a $25 board and Open Source Tools->

An anonymous reader writes: Hackaday has a 3 part tutorial with videos of using open source tools with a cheap ($25) FPGA board. The board isn't very powerful, but this could be the "gateway drug" to FPGAs for people who don't want to spend hundreds of dollars and install 100s of megabytes of software and license keys just to get their feet wet. The videos are particularly good--like watching them over their shoulder. As far as I know, this is the only totally open source FPGA toolchain out there.
Link to Original Source
Privacy

Tech Nightmares That Keep Turing Award Winners Up At Night 76

itwbennett writes: At the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany this week, RSA encryption algorithm co-inventor Leonard Adelman, "Father of the Internet" Vint Cerf, and cryptography innovator Manuel Blum were asked "What about the tech world today keeps you up at night?" And apparently they're not getting a whole lot of sleep these days. Cerf is predicting a digital dark age arising from our dependence on software and our lack of "a regime that will allow us to preserve both the content and the software needed to render it over a very long time." Adelman worries about the evolution of computers into "their own species" — and our relation to them. Blum's worries, by contrast, lean more towards the slow pace at which computers are taking over: "'The fact that we have brains hasn't made the world any safer,' he said. 'Will it be safer with computers? I don't know, but I tend to see it as hopeful.'"

Submission + - Kansas Secretary of State Blocks Release of Voting Machine Tapes->

PvtVoid writes: Wichita State University statistician Beth Clarkson has filed a lawsuit under Kansas' open records law to force the state to release paper tape records from voting machines, to be used as data in her research on statistical anomalies in voting patterns in the state.

Clarkson, a certified quality engineer with a Ph.D. in statistics, has analyzed election returns in Kansas and elsewhere over several elections that indicate “a statistically significant” pattern where the percentage of Republican votes increase the larger the size of the precinct. The pattern could be voter fraud or a demographic trend that has not been picked up by extensive polling. Secretary of State Kris Kobach argued that the records sought by Clarkson are not subject to the Kansas open records act, and that their disclosure is prohibited by Kansas statute.

Link to Original Source

Computers are useless. They can only give you answers. -- Pablo Picasso

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