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Comment: Qik (Score 3, Informative) 318

by eyeota (#40791107) Attached to: Man Claims Cell Phone Taken By DC Police For Taking Photos
qik.com has an app for iPhone/Android, etc allows you to stream video you're recording directly to your account over 3G/4G, etc. People dealing with TSA Abuse have been documenting and recording them using this app and similar. Even if your phone is confiscated, the video is already on the server.

Comment: Re:Placing blame (Score 5, Informative) 242

by eyeota (#32739634) Attached to: Hack AT&T Voicemail With Android
ATT's implementation is indeed to blame. CallerID is the calling presentation of a call, not the source/origination. Using CallerID to authenticate anything requires trusting the person making the call and that's just not smart. ANI or Automatic Number Identification is what should be used to identify the call; it's what is used to bill the call after all. No Bell in the right mind accepts ANI from their customer. The bell switch always lookus up the TN originating the call and set the ANI to appropriate value. The ANI is what should be used to authenticate VM as it cannot be set by the customer. Sprint's implementation is indeed correct as I've tried spoofing my own cell # in the past to call into VM was was unsuccessful.

Comment: Why Keep Batteries At All ? (Score 1) 155

by eyeota (#30248512) Attached to: Facebook Putting Batteries On-Board Its Servers
My company is in the process of designing our new/next data center and we're highly considering a non-battery based UPS solution from Active Power. It's the old 'fly wheel' technology of the past, upgraded to the 21st century. The idea is that the mechanical flywheel can sustain the load for 10-14seconds while the generator kicks on. The theory is that if your generators can't start up and switch over within 10-14 seconds (because of a failure), then they're probably not going to start up/switchover within 45mins--the usually battery backup time in a data center. Some people are using this technology to supplement their traditional battery arrays and make them last longer. The jury is still out on the solution, but looks promising.
Transportation

+ - Red Light Cameras Unplugged with Longer Yellows ->

Submitted by GovernmentSources
GovernmentSources (692054) writes "A state law that took effect in January made Georgia cities using red light cameras extend the duration of the yellow time by one second. At least seven cities complied, two did not. The cities with longer yellows saw an instant drop of violations of up to 80%, making the cameras unprofitable — so the cameras are now unplugged. Cities that ignored the law saw no benefit. The new law is exposing the safety lie of red light cameras."
Link to Original Source

Comment: CompUSA was the same way (Score 1) 417

by eyeota (#27159281) Attached to: How Office Depot Pushes Service Plans On Customers
When I worked at Compusa, we had similar quotas on our ESP (extended service plans) later renamed TSP (Technology Service Plans). The quota/goal was 3% of gross individual sales.

We didn't refuse sales, although, we would put sales out the door without going under our name in the system as to not affect our individual percentage.

Store managers were under the same type of pressure to maintain the overall TAP percentage and would basically do whatever was necessary to make it happen. One 'trick' was to 'negotiate' the sale of the TAP with the customer and discount the computer and record the reason as a 'price match'.

On the plus side, I do recall purchasing a couple 2 year Exchange Plans on cell phones there (when they sold them) in case my phone mysteriously died, I could get another phone of equal value [read newer/better] at that time. Strangely enough, both phones purchased failed around 18 months and I had to get an upgrade. Glad I had that instant exchange warranty on it. :)

Comment: Re:Would this have widespread use? (Score 2, Interesting) 462

by eyeota (#26891693) Attached to: Casinos Warn iPhone Card-Counting App is Illegal

Heck, I'm surprised they haven't equipped the tables with RFID readers and use cards with RFID in them so a computer at the table can maintain the count and watch the bets and point out potential card counters.

Some Casinos Do. L'Auberge du Lac in Lake Charles does. I was there 2 years ago playing BlackJack so when I asked to be rated for my level of play, she went to the computer attached to the table and pulled up my stats. She was able to tell my average bit, how many hands I played an hour, etc. That being said, I know that computer must also signal card counting betting patterns. [Note to anyone that plays there: The 'button' the dealer hits before dealing out the cards tells the computer a round has started to collect the wager -> player position for the round.

Comment: This violates common carrier (Score 3, Informative) 132

by eyeota (#26497509) Attached to: Anti-Piracy Firm Offering ISPs Money For Outing File-Sharers
This has a huge potential to backfire on the ISPs.

IANAL, but I have worked at an ISP before. ISP have some limited immunity from civil suits because they are a common carrier.
i.e. They're providing transport to another network (the internet) and the information the flows between it is the responsibility of the sender / receiver because they're merely providing the transport. The minute they start to police the network at a content level (like Nexicon suggests) they can potentially be liable for the information passing through their networks because they are now 'aware' of the illegal content and have a responsibility to act.

The cons outweigh the pros for this time of agreement. I dont' expect many ISPs to by into this B.S.

Comment: Re:Some data 4 U (Score 1) 721

by eyeota (#24031423) Attached to: OMG Did U C What U R Paying 4 Texting?
There is a bit of a difference. When you send a letter, the letter is being carried by 1 network--the post office/fedex/ups, etc. When you text--espeically if its between networks--then only the sending network gets the revenue and the receiver (company) doesn't get anything, yet still has the 'cost' of delivering it. Sure if there is a reply, it may even out, but notification services would tip the scales in favor of the sender's provider for sure. As for voice calls, quite simply, we're on a metered cellphone system. In the US, if you don't have an 'unlimited' plan for your local [land line] calls, then you would pay per minute--even inbound. Its obvious the cell phone companies are trying to push everyone to unlimited plans to get more revenue up front to improve cash flow and stabilize profits with more fixed A/R than variable.


There is a bright side. Companies start offering 'Unlimited Everything' plans (see Sprint) which force other carriers to do that. Then the carriers get into a price war over the unlimited plans and ultimately, the consumer witll win.

If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts. -- Albert Einstein

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