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Comment Re:IOT isn't as easy as it sounds. (Score 1) 64

True, but then you couldn't control it from the airport with your smartphone. You could argue security issues, but that would result in too many people not feeling the joy of controlling their home from anywhere in the world. Of course they forget others could too...that's besides the point, at least to those seduced by the "cool" factor. (I blame Apple...too use friendly for our own good..)

Comment Would you like to play a game.. (Score 2) 64

Okay, this is just too hilarious. It's like the movie "War Games" when the computer engineer left his dead son's name as a password before he disappeared. This sort of thing tends to happen when a non-engineer want to ensure absolute control in a quick dirty way. Of course anyone with any foresight (AKA IT/Engineering professionals or even Philosophers/Historians I expect) would have pointed out how easy a back door this would be. We already have tons of historical precedence. And then take two years to undo it? Probably a 3rd party pointed out they could be sued for negligence and said "get this fixed...now". The usual reactive crap when sales/iron grip overrides good judgement for short terms savings. Of course why anyone would want a device like this in their home giving people a potential back door for any hacker to get in through the Internet and play poltergist is slightly puzzling. People need to learn that "Convenience comes at the price of Security". Kind of sounds like: "With Great Power comes great responsibility". Of course nobody seems to learn from either phrase. And here's another one: "Those who forget their history are doomed to repeat it"...whoops...too late...

Comment Reassurances by PlacebosRus (Score 1) 83

Okay, I find it funny that the IRS reassuring people that SSN's were not stolen from them. Not sure it matters, the SSN' s were already stolen. All they wanted was the PINs and, Hey, 25% isn't bad. Still worth a fortune. Wonder if data would be safer being send by pigeon carrier. All these data breaches recently. FBI, CIA and the IRS.

Comment Re:Repeat after me: Vivaldi, Vivaldi, VIVALDI! (Score 1) 113

Really? I've been using it for a few months and I quite like it. It's FAST, very clear interface. Although...sometimes it's a little too clean; had to think where a few things were, but once I got over that. Plus it has a NoScript equivalent that makes Noscript look like kiddie scripts. Way more visibility and control overs scripting behavior than NoScript has.

Comment Great: Opera + Chinese Spyware (Score 1) 113

Think I'll get rid of Opera before there are any more updates and move to the Vivaldi web browser (created by opera guys apparently). when the Chinese nation gets their hands on anything, 2 things generally happen: Attempts to make it cheaper at our expense, or attempts to get more from us, again at our expense. I'm not saying westerns don't do some of this too, but China has a lot more practice at it. QQ and WeChat are two good examples.

Comment The Matrix Has You... (Score 1) 202

Imagine driving in a vehicle that can literally "take you for a ride". Hackers could have a field day with this. Wonder if law makers/enforcement agencies will allow a manual override. If people can get reveal private/classified information from federal agencies like the CIA and FBI, is a car (or car server network) going to be a tougher challenge? Hmm...

Comment Re:Cool in theory, but numbers may be too optimist (Score 1) 241

In my experience, many projects look great on paper but when the benchmarks of a what is in essence an experiment, they usually fall short. It's a worthwhile project for sure, but I'd bet more on 700k rather than 1.1 million. Solar Cells are not that efficient yet (we're getting there), and there is power delivery;How much power will we lose in transport over a physical medium with electrical resistance. (even with super conductors there is SOME loss, just less). This would be awesome in deserts where in theory there is minimal impact on the environment, but then again..do we really know the impact on the natural balance of things by putting in a few thousands solar panels for generating electric power. I know we've done smaller scale projects like this in China, for example and probably other places. But I kind of doubt energy proeuced will be enough to export much power to outsiders like Europe if any at all. Still, if it cuts emissions, that's cool. so why aren't we doing that in, say, Arizona or Nevada?

Sorry, my bad. Solar Cells are really part of this equation as it's using heat to produce steam. So it's a better approach than conventional solar power plants I knew about. I still think the numbers may be a bit less than they are marketing, but less is still better. Just wouldn't bet the farm on those numbers.

Comment Cool in theory, but numbers may be too optimistic (Score 1, Offtopic) 241

In my experience, many projects look great on paper but when the benchmarks of a what is in essence an experiment, they usually fall short. It's a worthwhile project for sure, but I'd bet more on 700k rather than 1.1 million. Solar Cells are not that efficient yet (we're getting there), and there is power delivery;How much power will we lose in transport over a physical medium with electrical resistance. (even with super conductors there is SOME loss, just less). This would be awesome in deserts where in theory there is minimal impact on the environment, but then again..do we really know the impact on the natural balance of things by putting in a few thousands solar panels for generating electric power. I know we've done smaller scale projects like this in China, for example and probably other places. But I kind of doubt energy proeuced will be enough to export much power to outsiders like Europe if any at all. Still, if it cuts emissions, that's cool. so why aren't we doing that in, say, Arizona or Nevada?

Comment Surrending Civil Liberties,All downhill from there (Score 4, Insightful) 350

When you get goodies like warrantless searches, you never want to give them up. Like Ben Franklin said "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety". Never were truer words spoken. Next we'll be using methods we condemned Germany and China for to "monitor for threats". From this respect, it's true We haven't learned from national or world history.

Comment "Squandarded productivity"?That depends... (Score 1) 153

Given that facebook has collected so much data that can be used by intelligence agencies, I'm sure they see this is VERY productive: People voluntarily giving lots of private data that has been used by hundreds of agencies including but not limited to government intelligence, insurance investigators, human resources, private intelligence/investigation, recruiting and marketing companies. Facebook has probably injected "nitro" into the fuel of face recognition technology development. Happy Birthday, Facebook (aka "The Facebook"). You've given us insight into our friends and family, in some cases more than the data owner probably would like if the thought about it in between postings...

Comment Re:It's what they say (Score 1) 112

Actually, scientists believe that one with a disorganized desk typically have highly organized/capable minds: if you change a messy person's "mess" they tend to know exactly how it was changed and it confuses them when they look for things. Read this article gave me a whole new prospective on the abilities of a messy person. :D

Comment Re:Linux is a fragile house of cards (Score 1) 699

Which distro was it? Ubuntu, Debian, Mint, another? It could be integrated as a gnome dependency but that seems strange. There are many flavors and it's possible not all of of them do this (I may try on virtual OS's just to confirm). Yes, it is illogical, but being open source + community driven, we have the ability to change it, either in code for submissions, or in bug reports. The thing about MS (Especially Windows 10 which sends data about you which is hard-impossible for a non-techie especially in Home edition to block/shut off and even Windows 7/8 may have their systems hijacked if they don't disable Windows updates in the "Services" and now there is no description in new updates so you have no clue what they are doing until it's too late..), is if the community says something is bad/irritating, MS says politely "f** you". With Linux distros, you have a chance of being heard. The only way MS hears anything, is if given an "offer you can't refuse" by the US government, or if everyone stops using MS Windows. (which while there is chance is happening with more Android/iOS/MacOS/Linux users leaving MS in disgust as they realize there ARE choices), is happening at a snail's pace. So it's your choice: Go with an OS where your opinion might matter, or with an OS that couldn't care less because they still think you are beholden to them.

Comment Re:Gonna get lambasted for this but... (Score 1) 699

I've read a few things about systemd that are not entirely positive. There seems to be a religious war about using or not using (and whether it should be optional). The thing is, hindsight is 20/20. When Linux was first conceived (and MS windows for that matter), no one foresaw anything like UEFI. How could they? Well..maybe if you were Nostradamus, but I'm not sure even he predicted this one. (anyone care to check his notes?) A living growing system must adapt to it's environment to survive and Linux (and MS Windows), are "living", growing, changing, evolving system. This is all part of the process. I just wonder how long before some genius says "hey, how about a new status on certain file/file locations that has an additional sudo like layer so people have to confirm this before they potentially nuke a UEFI system"). I'm sure it will happen eventually (hopefully very soon, we've had time to consider this...). I remember reading, "Make an idiot proof system, and the universe will build better idiots.". We'll get through this. Of course deleting things recursively is a dangerous operation and perhaps this is a sign that we should all stop being lazy and remember that "with great power comes great responsibility.". :D

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