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Comment: Er... BBC is a government agency, not profit (Score 1) 239

by evilandi (#47375349) Attached to: Following EU Ruling, BBC Article Excluded From Google Searches

>When you have a "press" that is either owned outright by corporations or heavily subsidized by corporation

Um, this is a story about the BBC.

You do know they're a British government agency, right? Categorically prohibited from any involvement with private corporations or any kind of profitmaking in their onshore activities, and with a board of trustees appointed by democratically-elected ministers?

Comment: French privacy laws are quite different (Score 5, Informative) 138

by evilandi (#47252443) Attached to: France Cries Foul At World Cup "Spy Drone"

It's worth noting why the French team in particular, so vehemently object to drones, in a way that other nationals might not, or at least might do so less outspokenly.

In France you have ownership of your own image. A photographer needs to have your permission if they want to take a photo that has you as the main subject.

Obviously they don't need permission if you're just an incidental bystander or a face in a crowd. But if you're one of the primary subjects, then in France, you have to give your permission.

This also applies to merchandising and the law is often used in a similar way to trademarking or endorsement.

Comment: Re:fsck you Jono. (Score 3, Informative) 62

by evilandi (#47056625) Attached to: Jono Bacon Leaves Canonical For XPRIZE

As plugs for your new book go, that was beyond subtle.

Good luck matey. And don't forget us coders back in Blighty's Midlands that you left behind for a new life in... ooh, look, it's actually not raining outside! What were we talking about again?

(Jono's new book is called "Dealing with Disrespect" and is available wherever your search engine takes you. No, I'm not affiliated.)

Comment: Re:Street Performer Protocol (Score 1) 394

by evilandi (#46940705) Attached to: Richard Stallman Answers Your Questions

The answer to most of those questions is "...and that's why Charles Dickens' novels were so very, very long."

SPP has been tried with varying success, usually for works that are provided in installations. For example, Charles Dickens' novels were serialised in newspapers; a single newspaper paid the bounty for each chapter, but there was no way to enforce their exclusivity after they hit the press. Horror writer Stephen King tried it and gave up after only a few chapters.

The UK's Linux Voice magazine operates on a variant of SPP; it had a kickstarter for subscriptions and also offers a printed newsstand edition, but all content is released under free licence after 9 months.

You're right about it theoretically relying on reputation for repeat business.

Comment: Street Performer Protocol (Score 2) 394

by evilandi (#46937947) Attached to: Richard Stallman Answers Your Questions

BoomBoom wrote:
> So what's the incentive to create works? How is an author paid?

The author proposes a work. He finds customers who want it made. He sets a bounty level. The customers pay the bounty (if not, author revises his bounty or moves on to another idea). The bounty is held by an independent third party (escrow). The author makes the work. The author releases the work TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC and receives the bounty.

https://www.schneier.com/paper...

I'm not saying it's a perfect model (in particular there is controversy about non-paying users benefiting from other's payment), but unlike RMS, I am at least answering your exact question. ;-)

Comment: UK has Islamic extremist problem in prisons (Score 5, Informative) 220

by evilandi (#46583125) Attached to: UK Bans Sending Books To Prisoners

The UK has a problem with Islamic extremist gangs in prisons. Printed material from external well-wishers and visitors is a huge contributory factor. This problem is far, far worse than any right-ring white gangs in US jails.

For example at the high security prison near Evesham, there is a large gang who slash the faces of anyone who refuses to convert to their brand of Islam. This isn't widely acknowledged by the prisons service, but it leaks out through staff such as prison nurses, who have to deal with the end results.

Comment: Funny thing about chips designed in Cambridge (Score 3, Interesting) 116

by evilandi (#45319795) Attached to: Mobile Devices Banned From UK Cabinet Meetings Over Surveillance Fears

Funniest thing about backdoors is that almost every mobile device in the world has an ARM chip, designed in Cambridge, UK. That's Cambridge as in MI5 open recruiting ground and MI6 clandestine recruiting ground.

Devices manufactured in China, using a British-designed chip, routed through British Telecom using Huawei equipment... as you said, what could possibly go wrong?

If I were the conspiratorial sort, I might have reason to suspect Cambridge-recruited personnel of working for the other side.

Comment: Re: We don't bother with sidearms, we use BIG GUNS (Score 1) 292

by evilandi (#45135477) Attached to: British Police Foil Alleged Mall Massacre Copycat Plot

It's more that an MP5 is standard issue for ordinary day-to-day duties by regular friendly bobbies on the beat, whereas an SA-80 or AR-15 indicates a specialist firearms officer who is only called in for extremely serious "incidents".

MP5 = friendly

SA-80 || AR-15 = Bugger off before you get caught in the crossfire

Comment: We don't bother with sidearms, we use BIG GUNS (Score 4, Interesting) 292

by evilandi (#45133413) Attached to: British Police Foil Alleged Mall Massacre Copycat Plot

Quite.

It's a big mistake to think that the British police are unarmed. They're not.

They just don't bother with piddling little pistols.

If you're going to have a gun, have a BIG GUN.

Other than for plain-clothed detectives working undercover, pistols are pretty much laughed at by the British police. Compare the stopping power of a weeny little Colt or a Glock to that of an MP5 sub-machine gun, G36 assault rifle or (God help you if you see one of these - strongly suggest you change your plans for that day) an SA-80 or AR-15 assault rifle.

Although British police don't routinely carry sidearms, in high crime urban areas they will carry SMGs or assault rifles in a locked gun cabinet in the boot (trunk) of their car. In extremely difficult or vulnerable areas such as airports or tourist hotspots, they will carry MP5s around, mixing in with the crowd. The bobbies carrying MP5s are very nice blokes, feel free to strike up a conversation with them. Just back off the ones carrying SA-80s and AR-15s, there's a good chap.

Our largest island is only 700 miles long. Where on earth are you going to run to, that a radioed-ahead armed response unit can't get to first?

I can fully understand why lots of larger countries have routinely armed police - calling for backup could take hours. But it's extremely difficult to outrun the police radio on an island only 700 miles long with a heavily-armed SMG & assault rifle unit every 25 miles or so, and CCTV at every trunk road junction (interstate intersection).

(The police at Birmingham Airport used to have those truly lovely-looking P90 bullpup rifles for manoeuvrability in corridors & aeroplanes; from my recent visit it looks like they've swapped over to MP5s - a shame as the bullpups just looked like a wonderfully practical bit of design. I once saw West Midlands Police using one of those wacky Steyr Augs - again, lovely design - but seem to have standardised now on SA-80s and AR-15s. There seems to be a lot more standardisation across the various regional firearms units these days. Probably very practical from a co-ordinated response point of view, but a lot less showy from a nerd point of view.)

Comment: Re:You can switch it off. (Score 1) 195

by evilandi (#44797181) Attached to: UK Mobile ISP Blocks VPN, Citing Access To Porn

What would be even better would be if those adults responsible for children, could have some way of banding together with other adults, and could make decisions together, so that they didn't have to keep repeating each other's mistakes.

And I suggest this be named "democracy".

What is this "gov't permission" of which you speak? Government ain't nothing but the will of the people.

Yeah, I know we Brits have a hereditary head of state, but she has no practical power beyond a bit of ceremony; everything is in the hands of democracy. This includes our decision to have filters by default, to have ubiquitous CCTV and to not buddy up to gun nuts who want to invade foreign countries on flimsy evidence.

Feel free to come back and lecture us about democracy when your head of state doesn't have a one-man veto on bombings.

Premature optimization is the root of all evil. -- D.E. Knuth

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