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China

Submission + - Apple Threatens Steve Jobs Doll Maker With Lawsuit->

redletterdave writes: "Apple has allegedly threatened to sue Chinese company In Icons over its eerily realistic 12-inch action figure of Steve Jobs, the company's late founder and CEO. The 1:6 scale model, which was said to be distributed by DiD Corp. in late February, comes with the clothes and accessories popularized by Jobs, such as the black faux turtleneck, blue jeans and sneakers. The figurine is packaged in a box that looks like Walter Isaacson's "Steve Jobs" biography cover, and also comes with a "One More Thing..." backdrop, as well as two red apples, including one with a bite in it. To make it extra creepy, the doll's realistic head sculpt features Jobs' famous unblinking stare. Apple reportedly wrote In Icons, telling the Chinese manufacturer that any toy that resembles Apple's logo or products, or Job's name or appearance, is a "criminal offense." Attorneys believe a Steve Jobs action figure released after his death violates the "right of publicity," which is a state law that protects one's image, voice, photograph, identity or signature from being used commercially without consent. Furthermore, California's Celebrity Rights Act in 1985 protects a celebrity's personality rights up to 70 years after their death."
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Censorship

Submission + - Iran wants their own internet, too->

An anonymous reader writes: Apparently Belarus isn’t alone in its insanity. Iran also wants to turn to keep its citizens in a private internet, too.

The Guardian reports that Iran has been testing technologies that would run its own internet. Just like Belarus, Iran would keep its citizens on the private, internal internet that it has created...

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Security

Submission + - Researcher Devises New DoS Attack->

itwbennett writes: "A Qualys researcher has cooked up a new, hard to detect type of HTTP denial-of-service attack based on Slowloris. 'The idea of the attack I implemented is pretty simple: Send a legitimate HTTP request and read the response slowly, aiming to keep as many connections as possible active,' said Sergey Shekyan. In order to achieve this, the size of the server's response must be larger than what its send buffer can hold at any given time. 'TCP doesn't advertise the server's send buffer size, but we can assume that it is the default value, which is usually between 65Kb and 128Kb. There's normally no need to have a send buffer larger than that,' Shekyan explained."
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Social Networks

Submission + - UK executive 'forced out of job' for posting CV on->

sweetpea86 writes: An executive who uploaded his CV to LinkedIn was forced to quit his job because he ticked a box stating he was interested in 'career opportunities'. John Flexman is demanding hundreds of thousands of pounds in compensation from his former employer, gas exploration firm BG Group, where he earned £68,000 pounds a year as a Graduate and Development Manager. He is thought to be the first person in the UK to bring a case for constructive dismissal.

The case highlights a grey area around employees' use of social networks such as LinkedIn. According to Kate Hodgkiss, Partner at law firm DLA Piper, employers have every right to seek to protect confidential company information by restricting LinkedIn and other profiles, but cannot prevent employees from looking for a new job.

The news echoes a report in December that a Californian Twitter user was being sued for $340,000 by his former employer for taking his online followers with him when he switched jobs. PhoneDog launched legal proceedings against Noah Kravitz, seeking damages of $2.50 a month per follower for eight months.

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Google

Submission + - Will Google+ Break Search?->

nonprofiteer writes: A journalist at RWW writes an angry screed about the way that Google is starting to privilege Google+ posts over content from other websites. His example is that one of his own RWW stories is outranked by two + posts about the story. He is worried that as Google tries to compete in social, it will ruin its dependable search interface. Madrigal at The Atlantic asks if "the missions of a social network and a search engine are antithetical." http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/01/atop-the-litany-of-google-plus-complaints-its-breaking-search/250863/
Link to Original Source

Comment Chile, technology leader of the region. (Score 5, Interesting) 291

Since I was a boy, Chile has always been known for being a leader in telecoms in Southamerica. It seems now that we are also leading in matters of technology rights. We also have Net Neutrality http://www.neutralidad.cl/ by law, ISPs can't block content nor censor it. Traffic shaping is also forbiddin (although it is still in use, since the Net Neutrality law is new). Our Minister of Telecommunications have said that the next goal is more competition and better prices both for Internet en cell phone communications. Also, in topic to this article. We have 3 major cell phone providers, and there are 2 more providers in the way. We also have more cellphones than citizens (20 million cells, in contrast to 17 mill citizens).
Games

Valve Announces Dota 2 128

RulerOf writes "Just over a year after hiring IceFrog, the lead developer of the wildly popular DotA Allstars mod for Warcraft III, and the speculation surrounding Valve's recent trademark filing for the 'DotA' name, Valve has officially announced Dota 2. Gameplay of Dota 2 is being ported 'exactly' from the current DotA Allstars and includes every hero, but vast improvements are being made to the game including VoIP, a coaching system, in-game rewards, and AI that takes over for disconnected players. Lastly, it all runs on top of the Source engine. (GameInformer's website appears to be struggling right now though, as they had an exclusive on this story.)"

The nicest thing about the Alto is that it doesn't run faster at night.

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