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Submission + - Adware Vendors Buying Chrome Extensions, Injecting Ads (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Ars reports that the developers of moderately popular Chrome extensions are being contacted and offered thousands of dollars to sell ownership. The buyers are then adding adware and malware to the extensions and letting the auto-update roll it out to end users. The article says, 'When Tweet This Page started spewing ads and malware into my browser, the only initial sign was that ads on the Internet had suddenly become much more intrusive, and many auto-played sound. The extension only started injecting ads a few days after it was installed in an attempt to make it more difficult to detect. After a while, Google search became useless, because every link would redirect to some other webpage. My initial thought was to take an inventory of every program I had installed recently—I never suspected an update would bring in malware. I ran a ton of malware/virus scanners, and they all found nothing. I was only clued into the fact that Chrome was the culprit because the same thing started happening on my Chromebook—if I didn't notice that, the next step would have probably been a full wipe of my computer.'

Submission + - SCOTUS to weigh smartphone searches by police (yahoo.com)

schwit1 writes: The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Friday to decide whether police can search an arrested criminal suspect's cell phone without a warrant in two cases that showcase how the courts are wrestling to keep up with rapid technological advances.

Taking up cases from California and Massachusetts arising from criminal prosecutions that used evidence obtained without a warrant, the high court will wade into how to apply older court precedent, which allows police to search items carried by a defendant at the time of arrest, to cell phones.

Submission + - Adblock's days are numbered (computerworld.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: PageFair offers a free JavaScript program that, when inserted into a Web page, monitors ad blocking activity. CEO Sean Blanchfield says he developed the monitoring tool after he noticed a problem on his own multiplayer gaming site. PageFair collects statistics on ad blocking activity, identifies which users are blocking ads and can display an appeal to users to add the publisher's website to their ad-blocking tool's personal whitelist. But Blanchfield acknowledges that the user appeal approach hasn't been very effective.

ClarityRay takes a more active role. Like PageFair, it provides a tool that lets publishers monitor blocking activity to show them that they have a problem — and then sells them a remedy. ClarityRay offers a service that CEO Ido Yablonka says fools ad blockers into allowing ads through. "Ad blockers try to make a distinction between content elements and advertorial elements. We make that distinction impossible," he says.

From ComputerWorld http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9245190/Ad_blockers_A_solution_or_a_problem_?taxonomyId=71&pageNumber=4


Submission + - The Looming Rise Of Full HD CCTV Cameras (itproportal.com)

siliconbits writes: An overwhelming number of close circuits television cameras across the world are analog models whose low quality images proved very often to be a challenge for its users; 2011 however could be the year where full HD CCTV cameras become mainstream. While Digital Video Recorders have rapidly replaced tape-based VCRs, analog video still rules the world of video security and therefore severely restricts the amount of data that can be captured as most analog sensors have a maximum resolution of 320,000 pixels.

Submission + - Zeus Evolution: Geographical Attack Locations (net-security.org)

Orome1 writes: Despite having been around for four years, Zeus continues to be a thorn in the side of the IT security industry and its business users, mainly because of its constantly evolving profile. This evolving profile is driven in part by the ease with which black hat hackers can develop the malware for new and varied applications. Ongoing research confirms the evolution of Zeus, with a growing number of Web sites that host Zeus variants, as well as the rising volume of networks hosting Command & Control servers for the Zeus botnet swarms. #esearch shows that the US (39.8 per cent), Russia (21.6 per cent) and Ukraine (6.5 per cent) were the top three countries, with Eastern Europe accounting for 32.0 per cent of Zeus configurations.

Submission + - Phantom Data Sent By Sleeping iPhones (thinq.co.uk)

Stoobalou writes: Now that just about every airtime provider is rethinking its mobile data plans, with most putting an end to unlimited contracts, it looks like iPhone users are paying more attention to their bills, and in particular how much data they are using.

A large number of users in the USA and here in the UK have discovered that their iPhones are apparently sending large chunks of data during the wee small hours using the 3G network.

Submission + - AT&T breach worse than initially thought? (tombom.co.uk)

ChrisPaget writes: I'm somewhat of an authority on GSM security, having given presentations on it at Shmoocon and CCC (I'm also scheduled to talk about GSM at this year's Defcon). This is my take on the iPad ICCID disclosure — the short version is that (thanks to a bad decision by the US cell companies, not just AT&T) ICCIDs can be trivially converted to IMSIs, and the disclosure of IMSIs leads to some very severe consequences such as name and phone number disclosure, global tower-level tracking, and making live interception a whole lot easier. My recommendation? AT&T have 114,000 SIM cards to replace and some nasty architectural problems to fix.

Submission + - Humans too simple to understand universe (edmontonsun.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: A top British scientist says we may never know all the secrets of the universe because, quite simply, we're just not smart enough.

"Just as Einstein's ideas would baffle a chimpanzee," said President of the Royal Society Lord Martin Rees, gaining a full understanding of how the universe works might not be possible "simply because they're beyond human brains."

The goal of science is to build better mousetraps. The goal of nature is to build better mice.