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Comment: Re:There are many filters (Score 1) 260

by Intrepid imaginaut (#46837515) Attached to: Are Habitable Exoplanets Bad News For Humanity?

Lots of cultures including extremely violent ones amounted to nothing. It hardly seems to be a factor, except to say that we can tick over quite nicely without privation. The Minoans in particular were very sophisticated for their time, However, I've often wondered if the hunter culture depicted in Predator, a highly advanced society that still conformed to apparently barbaric adulthood rituals was a nod in the direction of cultures deciding to embody the "no pain no gain" mantra. Introducing an artifical scarcity if you will.

Something to contemplate.

Comment: Re:There are many filters (Score 1) 260

by Intrepid imaginaut (#46836859) Attached to: Are Habitable Exoplanets Bad News For Humanity?

Our behaviour can not cope without scarcity.

Nonsense. People often become nonviolent in societies that one, have adequate amounts of food, two, have adequate amounts of water, and three perceive themselves as isolated from attack. For example, the Tahitian men, the Minoan men on Crete, and the Central Malaysian Semai were nonviolent during the period in their history when all three of these conditions prevailed.

Comment: Re:Maybe not extinction... (Score 2) 260

by Intrepid imaginaut (#46836679) Attached to: Are Habitable Exoplanets Bad News For Humanity?

In a mere couple of thousand years we've managed to move from "indoor plumbing lolwut" for most of the planet to space flight and fast cheap intercontinental travel. I'd say we're doing pretty well.

As for the great filter, one need only look at the number of mass extinctions that have occurred naturally. Even should the conditions for life as we know it be relatively common (as in life capable of interstellar exploration, not just subsisting under fifty kilometers of ice), the odds of intelligent life arising might be a tiny fraction of that. There could be an enormous array of variables in play, maybe local galactic conditions have only recently matured sufficiently to allow life to exist. Maybe we could simply be freak occurrences. Maybe nobody has managed to figure out FTL travel and they'll get round to us in a few millennia. Maybe nobody's got listening posts within the couple of light years it takes for our radio noise to peter out.

Am I saying the Drake Equation is almost certainly full of shit? Why yes I am.

Comment: Re:Lost civilizations? (Score 1) 38

by Intrepid imaginaut (#46835485) Attached to: Astronomers Discover Pair of Black Holes In Inactive Galaxy

Chilling thought really, late developing civilisations struggling to develop an interstellar, even intergalactic presence, pitting their collective intelligences against the growing cold and dark and the slipknot of gravity. I wonder would we ever be able to excavate black holes to find their last transmissions.

Comment: Re:Anybody know the plate# for each scotus? (Score 1) 449

by Jane Q. Public (#46834077) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

A person's word that an infraction has been comitted does, however, reach the status of being able to ask the suspected vehicle to pull over and expect the driver to answer at least one question, which probably would have only amounted to "have you had anything to drink tonight?", perhaps with a caveat that they had received a report about the vehicle so that the driver understands the reason for the question.

Not in my state. Here, the police can only pull you over based on probable cause of an infraction (or worse). "Reasonable suspicion" is not sufficient grounds.

Comment: Re:Those guys want pork funds too? (Score 1) 151

by Intrepid imaginaut (#46829451) Attached to: Asteroid Impacts Bigger Risk Than Thought

Yeah I can confirm they're for real, although they've been on a hiatus for a while by the looks of things. I can't imagine funding for such a project would be easy to come by nor scale models! Do drop them a line though, by what they're saying that really looks like the key to space.

Comment: Re:Forgot to mention... (Score 1) 449

by Jane Q. Public (#46828001) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

Automobiles in operation on public roads do not enjoy the same protections as a private home, vehicle on private property, etc. If the officer had found the suspect vehicle parked in a driveway, knocked on the front door and then smelled marijuana, he would have to go through the added step of justifying a search warrant.

I am aware of that. And IANAL either. But do you honestly think there was no reason at all for this to go all the way up to the Supreme Court?

Comment: Re:Anybody know the plate# for each scotus? (Score 1) 449

by Jane Q. Public (#46827737) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

It (theoretically) takes proof to convict. It only needs suspicion to investigate. [emphasis added]

That depends on what is being investigated, which is the crux of the matter here.

Generally speaking, it takes more than just "reasonable suspicion" for A SEARCH. It takes probable cause.

The idea that suspicion, rather than probable cause, is enough evidence for a search is what makes this decision so controversial. And, I might add, more liable to being overturned in the future.

A person's word that someone else committed a crime or infraction normally does not reach the status of probable cause.

Every young man should have a hobby: learning how to handle money is the best one. -- Jack Hurley

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