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Privacy

Rights Groups Push For Strong Broadband Privacy Rules (reuters.com) 29

An anonymous reader writes: A coalition of rights groups has sent a letter to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission asking for tougher privacy regulations on providers of broadband internet services. The letter was sent by the ACLU, the EFF, Public Citizen, and over 50 other groups. "Critics say broadband providers are already harvesting huge amounts of consumer data for use in targeted advertising, the groups wrote. 'This can create a chilling effect on speech and increase the potential for discriminatory practices derived from data use,' the letter said." FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has said such firms need to ensure their data is protected, and that consumers should know more about what data is being collected, but he hasn't addressed whether the data should be harvested in the first place. He expects the FCC to review these practices "in the next several months."

Comment Re:Not new (Score 1) 41

No, they are not doing this for publicity. Their goal is to improve the review process by attracting more people interested in the topic to the review process and make it more open.

I happened to attend the workshop last year and there was a very interesting discussion at the end about how to modify a review process to make it more open. While I didn't take part in the discussion, there were many aspects considered about the open peer-review process, both positive and negative. For example, some authors might be frightened to submit a paper when sending preliminary versions of their work. The selection of Reddit and ArXiv didn't have any publicity (or political) objective, they were just tools familiar to the people involved in the organization and the discussion.

I am some skeptical to this model, but still is a very interesting experiment so it will be nice to see how it compares to the reviews from previous editions.

Comment Re:tl;dr; (Score 1) 102

Of course the title is misleading! For a user-space programmer, the ISA is completely hidden by the compiler and the system libraries (for example, synchronization). Still, the document makes interesting points, such as different behaviour of the compiler (which apparently removes locks in ARM32 but not in ARM64) which could impact performance, especially for highly concurrent applications.

China

Despite Promises, China Still Targeting US Firms (crowdstrike.com) 125

itwbennett writes: Three weeks after the U.S. and China reached their first ever cybercrime and cyberespionage agreement, a new report from CrowdStrike details intrusions from hackers affiliated with the Chinese government, indicating they almost immediately broke their word. In a blog post, CrowdStrike's Dmitri Alperovich said the first observed intrusion was detected on September 26 – one day after President Obama hosted President Xi Jinping of China for a state visit.

Comment Re:Double every 4 years and it will take less than (Score 1) 269

You forget the simple fact that no exponential growth can be sustained forerver. Moore's law will come to an end (in a few years, btw), simply when the required size for transistors is smaller than a single atom (or a single sub-atomic particle if we manage to do that; the idea is the same). Dennard's scaling has already hit the wall. Networking will never send data using less than a single photon per bit (actually, the limit imposed by quantum noise is around 15-20 photons/bit) or a single electron/bit, and the amount of them is limited by transmission power. So no, there are some achievements which we won't obtain, because of simple phisical limits. You cannot simply sit and wait.

Linux Kernel Dev Sarah Sharp Quits, Citing 'Brutal' Communications Style 928

JG0LD writes: A prominent Linux kernel developer announced today in a blog post that she would step down from her direct work in the kernel community. “My current work on userspace graphics enabling may require me to send an occasional quirks kernel patch, but I know I will spend at least a day dreading the potential toxic background radiation of interacting with the kernel community before I send anything,” Sharp wrote. Back in July, 2013 Sarah made a push to make the Linux Kernel Development Mailing List a more civil place.

Comment Spanish SEAT too; CEO climbing in the group... (Score 1) 494

The Spanish brand SEAT, part of VW group, used some 500.000 of these tampered engines. Jürgen Stackmann, the CEO of SEAT is also leaving this company.

However, apparently he is not being fired, instead he will become the group worldwide sales chief (link in German).

Interesting and sad to see how some people are being blamed and fired, while others (in the same position in other company of the group) manage to leave unpunished and even use this opportunity to climb in the group.

Earth

The Paris Climate Talks: Negotiating With the Atmosphere 130

Lasrick writes: The Paris climate change talks are in December, but what negotiators plan to propose will only be part of non-legally-binding pledges—and they represent only what is achievable without too much difficulty. 2009's Copenhagen Accord say 114 countries agree that global temperature increases should be held below 2 degrees Celsius. "Paradoxically, an accord that should have spurred the world to immediate action instead seemed to offer some breathing room. Two degrees was meant to be a ceiling, but repeated references to an internationally agreed-upon “threshold” led many people to believe that nothing really bad could happen below 2 degrees—or worse yet, that the number itself was negotiable." Dawn Stover writes about alternatives to the meaningless numbers and endless talks: 'The very idea that the Paris conference is a negotiation is ridiculous. You can't negotiate with the atmosphere."

Comment Networking blog: ipspace.net (Score 1) 203

I follow Ivan Pepelnjak at blog.ipspace.net for advanced networking stuff (some topics are CCIE-level). He is great at explaining concepts, has strong opinions on new technologies and provides links to background information. He also gives weminars on multiple technologies (most are paid). Great source of information to get in touch with reality, apart from what appears in networking books. (Disc: I am not affiliated with him, but follow the blog and have attended some paid weminars).

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