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Comment: Re:Will it run Windows 8? (Score 1) 158

by enec (#43022563) Attached to: Pixel Picture Clearer? Google Ports Office-Substitute To Chrome OS, Browser

Windows 8's handling of HiDPI displays still leaves a lot to wish for. There is still just one "right" DPI setting, the "normal" scaling and anything other than that causes small artifacts on some apps due to the text being scaled up but some other elements not. It gets even worse if you connect an external monitor that has a lower pixel density and thus should use a lower DPI setting. You can't set different DPI's for different displays so one of them ends up looking ugly and just a bit off.

This is something that OSX does great. I have a Macbook Pro with the 220 ppi Retina display and a 27" Thunderbolt display. They use different DPI values and the transition is seamless even when dragging windows from one screen to the other. If I boot to Windows one display becomes basically useless. Either everything is way too small on the Retina display or everything is way too big on the external monitor.

But anyways, the Pixel is a normal x86 machine so I'd imagine it should be possible to install other operating systems on it.

Comment: Re:How long until the PS4 is irrelevant? (Score 1) 587

by enec (#42964523) Attached to: Sony Announces the PS4

The high requirements to emulate a PS3 or Xbox 360 stem from the fact that they are entirely different CPU architectures, so you need to translate the instructions in software, which requires loads of processing power. The PS4 was announced to use the x86 architecture with AMD's Jaguar CPUs so there would not be a need to emulate anything in software, you could run the same code natively on your PC. So in the case of the PS4 you don't need a 16Ghz processor.

The only potentially troublesome thing is the shared GDDR5 memory between the GPU and the CPU which is something you won't find in a normal PC.

Safari

Safari/MacBook First To Fall At Pwn2Own 2011 492

Posted by samzenpus
from the weakest-link dept.
recoiledsnake writes "A team of security researchers from the French pen-testing firm VUPEN successfully exploited a zero-day flaw in Apple's Safari browser to win this year's Pwn2Own hacker challenge. The hijacked machine was running a fully patched version of Mac OS X (64-bit). Bekrar's winning exploit did not even crash the browser after exploitation. Within five seconds of surfing to the rigged site, he successfully launched the calculator app and wrote a file on the disk without crashing the browser. Apple has just released Safari 5.0.4 and iOS 4.3 a few minutes before the Pwn2Own contest in an attempt to save face (a last minute patch for Chrome was also released) but failed."
Image

Upgrading From Windows 1.0 To Windows 7 499 Screenshot-sm

Posted by timothy
from the wait-for-the-rickrolling dept.
An anonymous reader writes "YouTube user Andrew Tait has uploaded a video titled Chain of Fools: Upgrading through every version of Windows. Tait starts with MS DOS 5.0 running Windows 1.0 and keeps upgrading the operating system until he reaches Windows 7, taking note of the changes to system settings and application compatibility along the way."
Cloud

Gmail Accidentally Resets 150,000 Accounts 401

Posted by samzenpus
from the did-you-need-that-mail? dept.
tsj5j writes "Many users have reported loss of their Gmail accounts, as they signed in to find their email accounts reset — losing years of email history. This appears to be a result of a bug which treats existing owners as new users. For those affected, Google is currently trying to resolve the problem. For the rest of us, perhaps this is a timely reminder to backup our data and be less trusting of the cloud."
Science

Secrets of a Memory Champion 290

Posted by samzenpus
from the never-forget dept.
Hugh Pickens writes writes "We've all heard of people who claim to have 'photographic memories.' Now Joshua Foer writes in the NY Times magazine (reg. may be required) that a 'skilled memory' can be acquired and proves it by explaining how he trained his brain to became a world-class memory athlete winning first place in the speed cards competition last year at the USA Memory Championship by memorizing a deck of cards in one minute forty seconds. According to Foer, memory training is a lost art that dates from antiquity. 'Today we have books, photographs, computers and an entire superstructure of external devices to help us store our memories outside our brains, but it wasn't so long ago that culture depended on individual memories,' writes Foer. 'It was considered a form of character-building, a way of developing the cardinal virtue of prudence and, by extension, ethics.' Foer says that the secret to supermemory is a system of training and discipline that works by creating 'memory palaces' on the fly filled with lavish images, painting a scene in the mind so unlike any other it cannot be forgotten. 'Photographic memory is a detestable myth. Doesn't exist. In fact, my memory is quite average,' concludes Ed Cooke who recently invented a code that allows him to convert every number from 0 to 999,999,999 into a unique image that he can then deposit in a memory palace. 'What you have to understand is that even average memories are remarkably powerful if used properly.'"

Comment: Not much to do (Score 5, Informative) 459

by enec (#35272714) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is There a War Against Small Mail Servers?

Most ISPs block outgoing port 25 because 99.99% of that traffic is viruses or otherwise malicious computers trying to send spam. Even more mail services block all dynamic pools used by major ISPs because of the same reason.

Just invest a few bucks a month into a cheap hosted VPS behind a static IP where you can run the server.

Comment: Re:Samsung Support (Score 1) 161

by enec (#35200912) Attached to: Samsung Unveils Galaxy Tab 10.1, Galaxy S II

I agree. I'm a (very dissatisfied) owner of a Samsung Galaxy Spica. When I bought it it shipped with Android 1.5, but Samsung promised to deliver 2.1 "soon".

In the end it took something like three months of "any day now", and they didn't offer the chance to upgrade OTA. When I installed Samsung New PC Studio (a complete rip-off of Nokia's PC suite btw, with the exception that Nokia's suite works) to update, I first had to struggle a few hours to get the software to recognize my phone at all. When it finally did, I had to select the "update" option for the phone half a dozen times until the software managed to connect and realize that there was an update out for my phone.

After the software started updating and put my phone in some sort of recovery mode, the computer would helpfully tell me that my phone had been disconnected and an unknown, malfunctioning USB device had been plugged in. Needless to say the PC studio software didn't ever finish updating, it thought the phone was unplugged as well and usually crashed.

I tried to update using different operating systems, different computers, different versions of their PC suite, different data cables, et cetera. Finally I gave up and took the phone to Samsung after sales service. The fsckers kept my phone for three weeks, and when I finally got to pick it up they said they had updated the OS to Android 2.1... Guess what? It was still on 1.5, and all they had done was reset the phone to factory defaults. Something I could've done in two minutes.

Asynchronous inputs are at the root of our race problems. -- D. Winker and F. Prosser

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