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Comment: Re:Awesome. (Score 1) 168

by enderjsv (#37222354) Attached to: PS3 <em>Counter-Strike</em> To Support Keyboard and Mouse

Ever watch Halo 3 in MLG? Some people are wicked good snipers even with a controller. The difference is it takes a lot of practice. Unlike with a mouse, where everyone is pretty much an expert sniper after playing for two weeks. Personally, I like that the skill cap is so high with a controller. But to each their own, I suppose.

Comment: Re:Awesome. (Score 0) 168

by enderjsv (#37221346) Attached to: PS3 <em>Counter-Strike</em> To Support Keyboard and Mouse

I really don't understand this argument. I mean, I can see how you prefer M+K, but it's not really that hard to play with a controller, once you get used to it. I know like a dozen people who all had that M+K only mentality and used to complain so much about controllers. I ask them now and they still say they prefer M+K, but don't mind playing with a controller at all so long as everyone else is. It's really not that hard to get used to. Try it out. You're missing out on some pretty good games.

Comment: Re:Awesome. (Score 1) 168

by enderjsv (#37221282) Attached to: PS3 <em>Counter-Strike</em> To Support Keyboard and Mouse

I agree with you. I always remember some guy saying he enjoyed a certain pc game but got tired of it when everyone got good enough to bunny hop through a corridor with a sniper rifle pulling off headshot after headshot. I feel like the ease of aiming with a mouse is almost detrimental to FPS games and makes them campy sniper fests. The difficulty in aiming with a controller broadens the width skill and makes the game less about point-and-click and more about movement and strategy.

I like to compare it to racing. Ask any driver if he would prefer to race with an automatic or a manual gear shift, and I bet most of them would say manual. It's just more fun that way, even if automatic is easier.

Comment: Re:no expectation of privacy (Score 0) 391

by enderjsv (#36561612) Attached to: LulzSec Document Dump Shows Cops' Fear of iPhones

Well, what I actually meant was, do they have to give up there privacy rights just because they're at work? If an office worker was working for the government, would it be okay for their boss to videotape them secretly just because they are a government employee. Granted, this isn't quite the same as an officer on duty handing out tickets, but my question is more about how being a "public servant" limits their expectation of privacy? Should it?

Again, just playing devil's advocate.

Comment: Re:no expectation of privacy (Score 0) 391

by enderjsv (#36560520) Attached to: LulzSec Document Dump Shows Cops' Fear of iPhones

Technically, I agree with you. But just to play the devil's advocate, should a government employee be expected to give up all rights to individual privacy just because they work for the government? Would you say the same of an office worker who found out they were being secretly recorded by their boss?

Comment: Re:Are you sure? (Score 1) 136

by enderjsv (#36467702) Attached to: What LulzSec Logins Reveal About Bookworms, and Passwords

I thought about doing a mix. Like, I have a series of numbers, symbols and letters that I've memorized. It's a very secure password, and I like using it because I can remember it.

But of course, using the same password on every site isn't good practice, so I've made various little changes to the series. Only problem is, it gets hard to remember what series fits what site. So I thought of using the same series for every site, and then simply attaching the first and last alphanumeric character of the website address to the password. That way I'll have a secure password on every site that is easy to remember wherever I use it.

"Though a program be but three lines long, someday it will have to be maintained." -- The Tao of Programming

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