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The Military

Airship Company Gets First Civilian Customer 81

Posted by samzenpus
from the float-into-the-future dept.
Zothecula writes "Hybrid Air Vehicles has recently achieved two massive commercial wins that seem to indicate that the airship has a very rosy future indeed. The aircraft's versatility plus an ability to stay airborne for 21 days enabled HAV to win a 517million contract (€370million) to supply a Long-Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle (LEMV) to the U.S. Army for deployment in Afghanistan starting in 2012. Whilst the LEMV is a relatively small vehicle designed for surveillance, HAV has now announced a civil customer for their heavy-lift variant."

Comment: Re:Great for Cycling (Score 1) 266

by emaveneau (#37068752) Attached to: How Does GPS Change Us?

I don't know of any units which plan routes based upon gradients, but some units offer 3d first person views and when using normal 2d map layout the elevations are shaded (if you have elevation data in your maps). So you plan a route yourself while scrolling around.

Yeah they are amazing for cycling. I've found bike stores in the middle of nowhere (some guys garage) when I really needed them (once in Quebec with a broken chain, and once in New Brunswick with a slashed tire which was patched but wouldn't hold for a full day).

It's also a lot less likely to miss turns, but when it happens, you can find out if continuing on will be okay or if you have to turn back.

It also takes a lot less time than handling paper based turn by turn directions, and it allows you to improvise so if a road surface is great you can stay on it and not worry since with a GPS device you will know if you're going parallel to the original route or not. e.g. On this recent trip I shaved off a lot of distance near the beginning v.s. this previous route (speed data in the last link is junk/a bug).

Comment: Tracking DNW; false positives. (Score 5, Informative) 569

by emaveneau (#30636606) Attached to: Bono Hopes Content Tracking Will Help Media Moguls
Tracking doesn't work. I have a youtube video with background music specifically legally licensed from magnatune for use on youtube.

Regardless, google/youtube flagged the audio and the dispute has been open for a month. In the dispute filing, I pasted the relevant text from the license and linked to it.

The video itself clearly has a link to the artists site at magnatune (as required). So if any person were to intelligently go to the site and read the license or just read the dispute data I filed, the problem would cleary seen to be valid and legal.

But I'm still waiting to hear back from WMG. The point I have is that Bono's technical suggestion to track everything will not work. In a very closed and controlled environment like youtube, the false positives are so numerous that legal content cannot be cleared and shared.

Here's the license from magnatune (from link above).

"If you'd like to use Magnatune music in a video that will be posted on YouTube, ... simply buy the album and use the music. ... you're required to include attribution of our music.

.

Windows

London Stock Exchange To Abandon Windows 438

Posted by timothy
from the don't-weld-shut-the-doors-then dept.
BBCWatcher writes "Computerworld's Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols reports that the London Stock Exchange is abandoning its Microsoft Windows-based trading platform: 'Anyone who was ever fool enough to believe that Microsoft software was good enough to be used for a mission-critical operation had their face slapped this September when the LSE's Windows-based TradElect system brought the market to a standstill for almost an entire day .... Sources at the LSE tell me to this day that the problem was with TradElect ...'"
Music

iTunes DRM-Free Files Contain Personal Info 693

Posted by kdawson
from the musical-steganography dept.
r2k writes "Apple's iTunes Plus files are DRM-free, but sharing the files on P2P networks may be an extremely bad idea. A report published by CNet highlights the fact that the account information and email address of the iTunes account holder is hidden inside each and every DRM-free download. I checked, and I found I couldn't access the information using an ID3 tag editor, but using Notepad I found my email address stored inside the audio file itself."
Privacy

+ - Hacking my Passport

Submitted by
choongiri
choongiri writes "I recently renewed my UK passport, and the new one contains an RFID chip. I have read lots of discussion here and elsewhere about the potential security implications of RFID in passports, and that got me wondering — what would it take to hack my passport? I know very little about how RFID works, so how would I go about reading the data that is held on my passport, and testing it to see if it can really be read with the cover closed, from across the room, and so on? Have any slashdotters tried reading their own passport RFID chips? Finally, is it really true that I could microwave my passport for a couple of seconds to deactivate the chip, and what would the implications of this be for me crossing borders. I live in Canada, so crossing into the US is an issue."
Microsoft

+ - MS Patent Applications Reveal Search Technology

Submitted by
eldavojohn
eldavojohn writes "In the roughly 90 patents they applied for on November 2, 2006, Microsoft reveals that it is apparently pushing its research in the search engine market. There are a few patents that reveal improved ranking methods and document classification but the real interesting ones revolve around linking related queries, optimizing search, identifying results that are spam and using a Bayesian classifier to measure feedback from the user. If that's not enough, there's even a few I don't quite understand. Another notable Microsoft application for a patent is the model for assisting children in authoring stories so you can't accuse Microsoft of not thinking of the children. Microsoft regularly applies for many patents but never so many revolving around search."
Space

+ - funding cut for Arecibo observatory

Submitted by
satorchi
satorchi writes "In a recent Senior Review conducted by the National Science Foundation, a panel of experts recommended the reduction of funding to Arecibo Observatory, the world's largest radio telescope. Unless other sources of funding are found, Arecibo faces severe cuts in its program, with the prospect of closure around the year 2011.

Development of the global project called the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is cited as a reason to decommission Arecibo, but with the SKA coming online around the year 2020, closure of Arecibo in 2011 is some ten years premature. Until SKA is up and running, Arecibo remains the world's most sensitive radiotelescope."

Mathemeticians stand on each other's shoulders while computer scientists stand on each other's toes. -- Richard Hamming

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