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Comment: If the government is doing nothing else (Score 1) 210

by elucido (#46928559) Attached to: US Government To Study Bitcoin As Possible Terrorist Threat

This is what they are paid ot do. They should study stuff like this and find ways to prevent terrorism.

There are always going to be users of anything good whether it be Bitcoin or the Internet, who will try to exploit or abuse the tool.

There are cults and terrorists out there. There are sex traffickers out there. These sorts of tools may empower them so what is wrong with studying that?

I'm sure other governments are studying how to use Bitcoin for cyberwarfare or for state sponsored terrorism so of course the United States should be looking at how to defend itself.

Comment: Cryptocurrencies are a potential terrorist threat (Score 1) 210

by elucido (#46928527) Attached to: US Government To Study Bitcoin As Possible Terrorist Threat

So I agree that the US government along with many others should be studying exactly this sorta thing.

Studying it is better than banning it. They have a certain mission and their job is to deal with warfare. The rest of us don't have to be concerned with war and terrorism 24/7.

But let's not pretend like there wont someday be a gang of terrorists who try to use Bitcoin because that is bound to happen someday. The better it is studied the more likely terrorism can be stopped.

+ - Mastercoin: A Second-Generation Protocol on the Bitcoin Blockchain-> 1

Submitted by xeniar
xeniar (2910615) writes "Alternative currencies have become a popular topic in the Bitcoin space. We have Litecoin and Primecoin introducing alternative mining algorithms with novel properties, PPCoin replacing mining entirely with a non-costly alternative, Ripple creating a cryptocurrency network that can store credit relationships and user-defined currencies, and over seventy more up and running with new ones being created every week. One particularly interesting project that has received a large amount of attention over recent months, however, is Mastercoin. The key difference in Mastercoin is this: rather than trying to bootstrap an entirely new blockchain, as every other cryptocurrency does, Mastercoin seeks to create an entirely new network of currencies, commodities and securities on top of Bitcoin itself."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Slip the backdoor into a precompiled GCC instea (Score 1) 576

by elucido (#44891437) Attached to: Linus Torvalds Admits He's Been Asked To Insert Backdoor Into Linux

Seems we need reminding of this classic by Ken Thompson.

Slip a backdoor into a RHEL 6.x (or any other major Linux distribution) version of GCC and make it do two major things:
1. Slip a backdoor into any Linux kernel it compiles.
2. Replicate itself in any version of GCC it compiles.

Choose some entry point which changes very rarely so the chances of incompatibility with new code is small.

This would probably keep RHEL with any kernel version tainted for generations of releases without very little chance of being spotted, because there are no changes in the distributed source code of either project

Or bugs in the random number generator.

Comment: Re:Some people ... (Score 0) 576

by elucido (#44891433) Attached to: Linus Torvalds Admits He's Been Asked To Insert Backdoor Into Linux

... can't tell the difference between humour and reality.

Torvalds said no while nodding his head yes is a JOKE people, not a fucking admission. Please, save the tinfoil paranoia for Reddit, and keep the serious tech discussions here.

Obviously it's a joke. It's not like anyone would admit something like that.

Comment: Re:Would probably be found (Score 0) 576

by elucido (#44891431) Attached to: Linus Torvalds Admits He's Been Asked To Insert Backdoor Into Linux

It's unlikely that such a backdoor, should it exist, would be coded so obviously, since the source is published. Instead, it would more likely be in the form of a subtle buffer overflow that results in previlige escalation or such, such that when found, it could simply be labeled as a bug rather than an backdoor... plausible deniability.

Exactly.

Comment: Re:Sounds promising (Score 1) 362

by elucido (#44814825) Attached to: Syrian Gov't Agrees To Russian Chem-Weapon Turnover Plan

The US uses chemical weapons too. I don't see the big deal. We pepper sovereign nations with depleted uranium and bomb people with white phospher. I'd say that qualifies under the definition of chemical weapons. If not, then certainly under other horrifying definitions.

In any case, when comparing other humanitarian causes to that of Syria, the ones in Africa are far worse and simply go ignored. I am doubly amazed. I am amazed that the US government can offer the causes they do with a straight face and I am amazed that people seriously buy into it.

When the US uses chemical weapons on you, then its a big deal?

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