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Comment Re:If you did not pay for the product, you are one (Score 1) 578

The model A (regardless of +) has no NIC: Wikipedia: Raspberry Pi / Networking

It's a common mistake. The A was thought to be used in schools for "projects", the B is the one that was sold to the public from the beginning (albeit, later you could get an A). I have two B, rev 1.... aka, the "original", which only came with 256MB RAM. The B rev 2 was identical, but had 512MB and only... The Raspberry Pi 2 is an entirely different beast.

Comment Re:Not quite (Score 1) 209

While not an OEM per say, I have done this with a Windows 7 System Builder version. Install Win7 System Builder, Upgrade to Win10, reinstall Win7. I did not do the rollback: an actual fresh Windows 7 installation which then requires activation. The activation of Windows 7 upon reinstall worked just fine. Granted, System Builder != OEM, but still...

Now, whether I could -for example- replace the HDD in that machine and try to install Windows 10, that I don't know. The hash is indeed for the machine you upgraded with all hardware it had at that point. However, for many machines upgrading is not somethiing that will happen (think laptops). I had planned to try such a situation (upgrade with 4GB RAM, nuke, install 8GB RAM and then install a fresh 10 and see whether it activates), but I have only limited time.

Besides, they're so desperate to see 10 adoption, they'll look a lot though the fingers.

Comment Re:Not quite (Score 1) 209

To be more precise, from what I understand. You upgrade your license (the OEM SLP one or the one on your sticker, which are technically two different licenses. Draw your own conclusion from that and how you can abuse this). During the upgrade process, you get a new product key. This product key, from what I've seen, is the same for every machine that is upgraded. That Win10 product key, for Home, ends with 8HVX7, for Pro, ends with 3V66T. Google that if you want.

What really happens is that a hardware hash is sent to Microsoft during the upgrade process. This hardware hash allows you to use those generic keys in the future (well, depending whether you had Home or Pro... Obviously), which means you can just use the generic ISO Microsoft provides (Finally, an official re-installation ISO! I've been waiting years for that). You can not use those generic keys on non-hashed hardware (Yes, I tried to see what happens). It will not activate.

However, your 7 license will remain fully functional. At least, that's my experience.

What would be an interesting test would be the following: Install Windows 7 in a VM, clone it, but don't run the second instance. Start the first instance, upgrade to 10. Keep it on 10. Now launch the second instance, which is 7 and never upgrade it. See if both remain active. This definitely violates the Microsoft licenses you have, but it would be interesting to see what happens. My prediction: both stay activated, but I'm not sure. I haven't tested it.

Comment Re:Not quite (Score 1) 209

For all Windows machines I have under my control, I upgraded to secure the upgrade that I'll have to do in 2020 anyway. Then in clicked "go back to Windows 7" (well, actually, I didn't... It's easier to image the disk, do the upgrade, and restore from image).
I did this for all machines I have with an OEM license. For some machines, that run Linux, I even bothered to image Linux, install the OEM that came with it, upgrade, put back the Linux image. Why? Because, those machines might still be functional in 2020. It might not be me who will use it, and the future user might prefer 10, so I like to give the future user that option.

That is quite a lot of work, well mostly quite a lot of time, but that way I have the license, and I can continue to use whatever I like (7 or Linux), while keeping my options in the future open.

Comment Re:"You have to upgrade NOW, or you are losing mon (Score 1) 4

How do you mean that? You expect 10 to become better? Upgrading to 10 also means you give Microsoft free reign over your computer. With 7/8(.1) you had at least a certain level of control.

Basically, the best way is to upgrade and then rollback. That secures your "free" upgrade and you can continue to use whatever you like.

Going the speed of light is bad for your age.