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Submission + - Slashcott: is the Altslashdot site OK? ( 3

j_presper_eckert writes: Hello, and my apologies for the off-topic submission.

Is anyone else who's planning on joining the (very) imminent slashcott having difficulty in reaching

I ask because, despite several careful attempts, I have not yet been able to successfully reach the new wiki this evening. (It had been fine on Friday, though.) For me, the address is now resolving as and is also showing as a parked domain courtesy of some place in France.

I'm concerned about the new site still not being "ready for primetime" despite the slashcott being almost literally around the corner. Did I somehow fumble-finger the link, or are others seeing the same thing when they try to reach Altslashdot??? TIA

Submission + - Valve's Steam removes its first game ( 1

tlhIngan writes: Today marks the first day that Valve has removed a game completely off its service. Order of War: Challenge has been not only removed from the service, but it is the first to be removed completely from a user's library as well. Previously, when a game was removed from Steam, it was just removed — as long as a local copy exists in your library, you could always play it, back it up, reactivate it, etc, (similar to Apple's iTunes and App Store — it may be gone, but as long as a copy exists, it'll work). Now it appears that Valve has actually gone the next step alongside Amazon and Google and removed games from a library.

Submission + - Chinese professor builds Li-Fi system with retail parts (

alphadogg writes: The equipment is big and expensive, with the research costs at almost $500,000. But by just using retail components, Chinese professor Chi Nan has built her own Li-Fi wireless system that can use LED lights to send and receive Internet data. "I bought the lights from Taobao," she said, referring to the Chinese e-commerce site. The professor from Fudan University showed off the technology on Tuesday at the China International Industry Fair in Shanghai. Unlike traditional Wi-Fi routers that use radio signals, Chi's system relies on light to send and receive data wirelessly. Others scientists, especially in the U.K., have also been researching the technology, and dubbed it "Li-Fi". But rather than develop specialized hardware, Chi bought off-the-shelf retail parts to create her system.

The trouble with money is it costs too much!