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Churches Use Twitter To Reach a Wider Audience 169

Posted by samzenpus
from the go-tell-it-on-the-internet dept.
In an attempt to reverse declining attendance figures, many American churches are starting to ask WWJD in 140 or fewer characters. Pastors at Westwinds Community Church in Michigan spent two weeks teaching their 900-member congregation how to use Twitter. 150 of them are now tweeting. Seattle's Mars Hill Church encourages its members to Twitter messages during services. The tweets appear on the church's official Twitter page. Kyle Firstenberg, the church's administrator, said,"It's a good way for them to tell their friends what church is about without their friends even coming in the building."

Comment: Slight Error In Summary (Score 4, Funny) 94

by elefantstn (#27534203) Attached to: Microsoft's "Pseudo-Transparent" and Fold-Up PCs

One was a 'pseudo-transparent' iPhone-like device called nanoTouch, which has a trackpad on the back rather than a traditional touch screen and gives visual feedback in the form of a simulated image of the user's finger (the effect is like looking straight through the device). The other was a folding dual-screen device called Codex that can switch automatically between landscape, portrait, collaborative, or competitive modes depending on its 'posture' or orientation.

The other was not called 'Codex,' but rather 'shuffleClassic.'

Comment: Re:That's just a bit premature... (Score 1) 336

by elefantstn (#26952743) Attached to: Cory Doctorow Calls Death To Music, Movies, Print

"How many bloggers are embedded in Falujah?"

Here's one who's doing at least as much hot-spot in-country reporting as your typical NYT correspondent: http://michaeltotten.com/ There's no particular reason you need to be a full-time employee of a print publication to report from warzones.

David Simon is probably right that there will always be major media organizations who maintain pools of employed reporters to deploy to newsworthy locations, but why "large" has to equal "print" I'm not quite so sure.

Comment: Re:Accounts need 2 access no's: In & Out #'s (Score 2, Interesting) 67

by elefantstn (#26949655) Attached to: Uncle Sam's Travel Site Grounded By Breach

You wouldn't give the Kwik-E-Mart your checking account number. You use a credit card (if not cash) because it has fraud monitoring and the ability to dispute charges.

What you were missing in your GP comment is that in this particular scenario, the OP only needs to give govtrip.com access to his account for deposit reasons. Therefore, if someone were to steal his information under the multiple-account-number system, all they would have is the ability to deposit more money into his account. He's not using his checking account to pay for anything on that site.

Comment: Re:Good for employment, bad for productivity. (Score 4, Insightful) 809

by elefantstn (#26363481) Attached to: $30B IT Stimulus Will Create Almost 1 Million Jobs

Every single one of your examples is, not coincidentally, a privatization where the government granted a monopoly or oligopoly to providers. It should not be surprising that a private company with no competition is as corrupt and inefficient as a government.

I think it's time we saw more nationalization of what's important, not privatization. Leave the non-important stuff to capitalists and market forces

'Importance' has nothing to do with it -- availability of competition does. For goods like internet access, we can improve quality by loosening corrupt, good-ol-boy licensing/franchising deals that lock customers into Comcast-or-dialup. For goods like train service, it's probably not feasible.

Food, though, is certainly more 'important' than either of those two, and every instance of nationalized food supply seems to result in famine.

Technology (Apple)

+ - AppleTV + Interest Lagging, Apple Offers Vaporware

Submitted by Webster Phreaky
Webster Phreaky (666) writes ""Apple will add new features and capabilities to its iPhone and Apple TV products through a series of future software updates, the company confirmed last night." http://www.macworld.co.uk/news/index.cfm?RSS With reports from CREDIBLE Columnists or Analysts (not the usual Apple Media Whores) that the iPhone lacking " Analysts say the iPhone isn't smart enough" http://www.macworld.co.uk/news/index.cfm?RSS&newsI D=17058 and the sales of the much hyped "copycat" AppleTV STAGNENT http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/07/04/20/targ et_stores_to_pick_up_apple_tv.html, it's time for Apple to make the Traditional Marketing fallback ... offer VAPORWARE. Ask anyone in marketing and sales, especially if they've been stuck with a slacker of a product, and they'll tel you that the number one resource to pull out of the closet of Bad Sales Tactics is promise "future undisclosed updates" and them pretend that you can't be specific right now for various reasons. Folks and Apple Kool Aid Drinkers, this is just the USUAL Apple and Stevie Gods, err Jobs, marketing B.S. that has been going on since 1984. You watch, you've been warned."
Java

+ - Trolltech is opensourcing Qt for Java

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "Trolltech released their second beta of their upcoming product, Qt Jambi, today. With this release they are dual licensing the product under a commercial and a GPL license. Being founded on a very solid framework, Qt, and now with an opensource license, they should be prepared to take on the other established toolkits, like Swing and SWT. For full details, see the press release: http://www.trolltech.com/developer/downloads/qt/qt jambi-beta"
Software

+ - Adobe to Open Source Flex

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Adobe Systems Incorporated today announced plans to release source code for Adobe Flex as open source. This initiative will let developers worldwide participate in the growth of the industry's most advanced framework for building cross-operating system rich Internet applications (RIAs) for the Web and enabling new Apollo applications for the desktop. The open source Flex SDK and documentation will be available under the Mozilla Public License (MPL)."
The Courts

Perens Counters Claim of GPL Legal Risk 145

Posted by Zonk
from the not-so-fast-my-friend dept.
Microsoft Delenda Est writes "After ACT, a Microsoft front group, started claiming that the GPLv3 was legally 'risky' and could give rise to anti-trust liability, eWeek has published a rebuttal by Bruce Perens. Aside from the fact that IBM, HP, Red Hat, and a couple dozen corporate lawyers are watching over the creation of the GPLv3, there is already precedent that shows the GPL is unlikely to give rise to any significant liability — Daniel Wallace v. FSF. In that case, pro se litigant Daniel Wallace was all but laughed out of the courtroom for alleging the GPLv2 violates anti-trust law, and the GPLv3 clauses in question are simply clarifications and extensions of clauses in the GPLv2. Presumably, that is why the ACT neglected to cite any precedent substantiating their allegations."

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