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Comment: *PUBLIC* posts (Score 4, Insightful) 456

by elecmahm (#40028687) Attached to: Online Loneliness At Google+

The whole premise of G+ is that it's built around private sharing with your circles. There's a lot of public sharing, sure -- but it's INTENDED to be private. That was the whole selling point for why people chose to use it over Facebook. My G+ feed is constantly being updated in a very lively manner with both public and limited posts by a variety of people.

The study is based on a flawed premise. They should find some other metric aside from "public posts" for determining how engaged the userbase is.

Comment: Re:Not Excited (Score 1) 295

by elecmahm (#39889111) Attached to: Bethesda Announces <em>Elder Scrolls</em> MMO

I would actually be really interested to see a TES MMO that made playing as an NPC-type char a viable / fun option. I typically ignore the main questline because the world is far too rich to be limited by that (and the sidequests are more interesting, IMHO).

I don't think it would be THAT much of a stretch for them to make alchemy a bit more challenging and rewarding -- where you could say proudly "oh my character is a level 35 alchemist." A lot of the things that I enjoy doing in the game are fun until they feel like grinding because they are no longer challenging (like alchemy, for example, or archery) -- If they were to build on the tech-trees of Skyrim, perhaps distill them down a *little* bit and then integrate it into the real-world like how Animal Crossing did (with time of day and whatnot, though maybe have different "time zone" servers, so that you can sign onto the one that best fits your play schedule)... it could be legitimately fun.

OH. If they're going to do home ownership then the towns MUST be more flexible and allow new buildings to be created.

Comment: Re:heh (Score 1) 1091

by elecmahm (#39426145) Attached to: Why Linux Can't 'Sell' On the Desktop

Linux is also not "just for programmers" or "great if you're a techie", either. My mom, my late grandparents, a good amount of my extended family -- they all use linux. They used to use windows. The amount of support required to maintain the system (like when something breaks, or they want new hardware) has been *NO DIFFERENT* since they changed over.

People perpetuating that myth are both (a) people that have not used linux seriously for nearly 20 years and (b) trolling.

Comment: Re:heh (Score 1) 1091

by elecmahm (#39426083) Attached to: Why Linux Can't 'Sell' On the Desktop
I'm in a dilemma over this very situation myself -- I run linux-only (not even windows VMs or dual-booting at this point) on my desktops at work and at home and also on my laptop; it's been 2...3? years since I switched. I'm getting ready to replace my aging laptop and am mulling over the best route to go. I know I don't want windows -- I find windows frustrating to use anymore because it's so restrictive and many things seem asinine. I've very seriously considered Apple; maybe buying a macbook used or something to curb the costs; it would be really nice to run a couple apps that I am familiar with (Reason, InDesign) that I cannot get to run correctly in Wine (yet!). But living in Apple world is a lot of nickel and diming, and the stuff is expensive. Not to mention my ethical disagreements with their business. Linux is the clear choice for me. I feel free-r and overall happier. It has apps that I like, I can run nearly all the programs I need to (I'm playing Skyrim through for the second time right now), and it's just really nice that I can get excited about new versions without having to worry about the transition or paying for it or anything. The open-source aspect is cool, and I respect it, but it's not the major selling point for me, use-wise. I am happier, overall, with my computing experience since switching to only linux.

Comment: Re:That happens when its BOTH high-fat and high-ca (Score 5, Informative) 507

by elecmahm (#31657670) Attached to: Fatty Foods May Cause Cocaine-Like Addiction

The difference between "Fructose" and "Sucrose" (table sugar) is significant, biochemically.

Sucrose is a Glucose + Fructose molecule, linked by a glycosidic (read: "Oxygen atom") bond. The body uses an enzyme, Sucrase, to split up that sucrose into its glucose and fructose componenets.

Sucrase acts, indirectly, as regulator of sorts -- when a whole lot of sucrase is being used, the body observes that change and reacts accordingly, "Hey, we're good on sugar!"

But with High Fructose Corn Syrup, the need for Sucrase is bypassed, leaving that regulatory system out of the loop.

The Sugar lobby may be big, but the Corn lobby is much, much, bigger. And it's heavily subsidized. The main reason HFCS is cheaper than sugar is because of government subsidies.

Comment: No Adobe? (Score 1) 206

by elecmahm (#31012094) Attached to: Eight PHP IDEs Compared
I know that Dreamweaver wouldn't be a "traditional" IDE -- but PHP isn't a traditional language either. Dreamweaver can do PHP, JavaScript, HTML / CSS, etc. -- does color coding, code suggestions / "intellisense", and is project-oriented. I enjoy using Eclipse for GWT, Java, Python, (and even for PHP too), but at work, using Dreamweaver is just easier. The article summary made no mention of using strictly FOSS, so was there a reason to exclude DW?

Comment: Why not just design tabletop games? (Score 3, Insightful) 68

by elecmahm (#30889058) Attached to: Researchers Make a Case For Learning Through Video Game Creation

The critical thinking and intimate understanding isn't exclusive to VIDEO game development -- it's a fundamental aspect of game design. One must understand the inner workings of whatever it is you're trying to model, at an abstract level, in order to make a game out of it.

Tabletop gaming also doesn't require a computer (although they can facilitate it), so schools with less computer access can still participate. The best part, too, is that there is likely to be one or two games each year that are actually fun to play; Those games can be used by future classes for teaching. In a classroom environment, where kids are forced away from video games anyways, allowing tabletop games in should be a welcome alternative to enduring lectures.

There's a whole movement called "Serious Games" -- MSU even has a graduate degree in it. Check it out.

Remember the good old days, when CPU was singular?

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