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Comment: Re:Though High, Not Even Close to LinkedIn Hype (Score 4, Insightful) 93

by econolog (#36636998) Attached to: Zynga Seeks $1 Billion In IPO
What we actually have here is new companies filing for IPO's which allows the company to raise capital to expand and generate revenue. Many companies in other sectors launch IPO's long before they are profitable. Consider that we have seen relatively few tech IPO's in the last couple of years. Maybe this should be taken as a sign that there is some growth happening? I thought that before we had a bubble there had to be a build up... After all in the first bubble there wasn't a good frame work for many to generate revenue. Now several forms have been developed and new applications are becoming apparent. This increases the value of tech companies and the odds of new ones becoming profitable. On the other side it could be seen as entrepreneurs going for a mad dash to cash out on the equity they have developed in a scam-like fashion (eg: leaving shareholders with more or less worthless companies while cashing their stock options). I think that is largely how it is perceived in the general financial community but it remains to be seen if this is warranted. It could be a self enforcing effect where financiers see potential signs of a bubble -> cut funding -> entrepreneurs are worried about loss of hard work -> issue IPO. Summary: Could be a little early to call a bubble though the US isn't out of the woods yet.

Comment: US History... (Score 0) 835

by econolog (#36549444) Attached to: LulzSec Posts First Secret Document Dump
Does anyone else think this is a little odd considering the US was built from immigrants? If they are concerned about supporting new citizens on welfare, SS, etc. prospective immigrants could be given voting rights/citizenship but wouldn't qualify for government funded benefit programs. It eliminates the burden that the gov would be liable for while providing a motivated workforce and allowing immigrants an opportunity raise their children in a better place, live in a relatively safer place, get payed more, and enjoy freedom among other things.

Comment: Ethics... (Score 2) 227

by econolog (#36479182) Attached to: Are 'Nudging Technologies' Ethical?
We can say it's unethical but it has happened the world over for many years now and in less noticeable ways than signs. The source of this isn't always the government of that area. Marketing is a form of this for example. The ways people can be manipulated are not limited to just this. TV is a very good medium. There are ways this can be applied in other media but video tends to be the most effective. Social media is also very powerful. As far as this altering your experience (which shapes the individual) it can be summarized that you have less control than you think.

Comment: Re:Not anti-intellectualism (Score 1) 949

by econolog (#36366802) Attached to: Is There a New Geek Anti-Intellectualism?
Well you are also wrong again (your groupon sig) Whether people like it or not it matters what you get your degree in and where you go. So say you plan on going to that community college for a degree in literature... that might not benefit you financially. http://www.payscale.com/best-colleges/degrees.asp There is also a website that calculates the annual difference in average salary depending on the university, major, and grades. I don't have time to find it right now but you can probably find it on Google. **All** show that it's significantly beneficial to go to university and that which school you go to matters.

Comment: Re:Haha (Score 1) 308

by econolog (#36337376) Attached to: Hacker Group LulzSec Challenges FBI
Not to be a douche but they are called cyber-terrorists and the US has already thrown the term around some. To be fair to the US government there are people who want to harm the US and people in general. There is information publicly available on how to build nuclear devices, bio-weapons, and chemical weapons. These can be as small as a briefcase and smaller. There is a legitimate need for security and monitoring considering the number of people one of these alone can kill. To counter this, there was a time when "freedom" was worth lives. Today it still is though the way this is done is differently. The world is not a simple place. Within these clumped together groups (IE: US Government, NSA,etc.) you have individual actors who can have individual motives contrary to those stated. There can be double (or more) agents. There can be conflicts about methodology internally. There are a lot of factors in every event/action and I think the internet in general has been blind to this.

"In the face of entropy and nothingness, you kind of have to pretend it's not there if you want to keep writing good code." -- Karl Lehenbauer

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