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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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Comment: Re:What a wonderful unit! (Score 1) 332

by eastlight_jim (#49457499) Attached to: California Looks To the Sea For a Drink of Water

I appreciate some of your points. I had to look up how many days it rains here (not easy to guess) and it turns out to about 30% of days (reference).

I can't give stats for everyone in the country but in my house, with 2 people, we each cycle a lot and take a shower every day with at least one bath a week. We do a couple of loads of laundry and all the normal washing/cooking/toilet flushing you expect. We collect rain for usage in the garden but importantly we have plants adapted to the local climate. We use 60L/person/day i.e. less than one sixth of a Californian. If I had a moderate pool (say 5x3x2m i.e. 30,000L, 8000 US gallons or 24 milliacre feet), that means that I could drain it and re-fill it completely every 2 months and still come in under a Californian usage. Surely most pools don't need much maintenance water provided they are covered when not used?

Comment: Re:What a wonderful unit! (Score 1) 332

by eastlight_jim (#49457267) Attached to: California Looks To the Sea For a Drink of Water

It's great isn't it? Google says 1 acre foot is around 1.23 megalitres (reference) or 1230 m^3.

The more astounding bit once you do the conversion is that according to TFS the average individual Californian living in a 5 person household uses well over 300 litres per person per day (reference). I'm from the UK, a place with over twice the rainfall of California, and yet our typical usage per person in a five person household is only 100L/person/day (reference). Even our "high usage" households only use 135L/person/day, only just over 1/3 of the *typical* California usage. What are they doing with it all?

I know the Californians like to blame agriculture for using the majority of the water (true) but these stats are just examples of the monumental waste of water that occurs, both industrially and residentially. If these waste problems were solved, I'd imagine there wouldn't be a shortage of water at all.

Comment: It is rather ironic, isn't it? (Score 1) 1

It's bad enough that slashdot silently redirects all https connections to http.

For some extra amusement, here are some stories slashdot ran regarding expired certificates:

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/13/02/23/1415231/certificate-expiry-leads-to-total-outage-for-microsoft-azure-secured-storage
http://tech.slashdot.org/story/13/03/05/0143218/microsoft-azure-failure-ssl-certificates-were-updated-sort-of
http://slashdot.org/topic/datacenter/azure-crash-blamed-on-expired-ssl-certificate/

+ - Slashdot/Geeknet GeoTrust SSL certificate expired on 2013/04/22 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Slashdot — the highly technical web news site — has allowed their GeoTrust-issued SSL certificate to expire on 2013/04/22. Why didn't Geeknet, Inc renew their certificate? Are they unaware that their SSL certificate has expired? And should a visitor be the one to tell Geeknet that their SSL certificate has expired?"

+ - Ask Slashdot: High availability expectation 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Recently, an employer has had experience with Red Hat High Availability Add-On in a High Availability Cluster. Previous engineering left much to be desired with the old engineering not even being correctly licensed, CLVM missing basic setup options and more. Eventually, they called in the 'consultant army' to grasp at straws and eventually suggest that a High Availability NFS service can only be made with VMWare Fault Tolerant VMs. As it turns out, VMWare Fault Tolerant VMs have their own problems. NFS will be served from VMWare SCSI translated from Fiber Channel SAN and rely on a mash-up of technician responses or VMWare triggering a restart of the machine in the event of an issue.

Today, the current engineers are in a bit of a tough position. With a single consultant defining NFS service availability being a product of VMWare's HA VMs, the management has decided that the only reasonable direction is to push the NFS and PostgreSQL environment into VMWare.... permanently. This will eventually lead to a maintenance nightmare as the environment must be "Highly Available" — which includes forgoing any patching for uptime. Any advice from fellow slashdotters on explaining the misunderstanding of Guest HA and Service HA we seem to have?"

Comment: Re:Tagged "whocares" (Score 1) 86

It's also still there in the title tags:

  <title>Slashdot: News for nerds, stuff that matters</title>

However, since many browsers, especially those on Windows, dropped the title bar for more viewable screen area, it's often not shown. It does flash up for a few hundred milliseconds in the tab text in FF on Windows but is rapidly replaced with "Slashdot".
GNOME

GNOME 3.8 Released Featuring New "Classic" Mode 267

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the extend-freely dept.
Hot on the heels of the Gtk+ 3.8 release comes GNOME 3.8. There are a few general UI improvements, but the highlight for many is the new Classic mode that replaces fallback. Instead of using code based on the old GNOME panel, Classic emulates the feel of GNOME 2 through Shell extensions (just like Linux Mint's Cinnamon interface). From the release notes: "Classic mode is a new feature for those people who prefer a more traditional desktop experience. Built entirely from GNOME 3 technologies, it adds a number of features such as an application menu, a places menu and a window switcher along the bottom of the screen. Each of these features can be used individually or in combination with other GNOME extensions."
Cloud

Certificate Expiry Leads to Total Outage For Microsoft Azure Secured Storage 176

Posted by timothy
from the keeping-the-lights-on dept.
rtfa-troll writes "There has been a worldwide (all locations) total outage of storage in Microsoft's Azure cloud. Apparently, 'Microsoft unwittingly let an online security certificate expire Friday, triggering a worldwide outage in an online service that stores data for a wide range of business customers,' according to the San Francisco Chronicle (also Yahoo and the Register). Perhaps too much time has been spent sucking up to storage vendors and not enough looking after the customers? This comes directly after a week-long outage of one of Microsoft's SQL server components in Azure. This is not the first time that we have discussed major outages on Azure and probably won't be the last. It's certainly also not the first time we have discussed Microsoft cloud systems making users' data unavailable."
Privacy

Skype Hands Teenager's Information To Private Firm 214

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the but-we-were-friends dept.
New submitter andrew3 writes "Skype has allegedly handed the information of a 16-year-old boy to a security firm. The information was later handed over to Dutch law enforcement. No court order was served for the disclosure. The teenager was suspected of being part of a DDoS packet flood as a part of the Anonymous 'Operation Payback'." According to the article, Skype voluntarily disclosed the information to the third party firm without any kind of police order, possibly violating a few privacy laws and their own policies.

Comment: Re:Scrap them all (Score 3, Interesting) 378

by eastlight_jim (#39951289) Attached to: Overheated Voting Machine Cast Its Own Votes
The argument Stallman uses against this is that we, as voters, have no way to know whether the code actually running on the machine in front of us is the same as the open code that we have reviewed. Ultimately there will come a time when a very select number of people are responsible for compiling the code and putting it on the machine. If those people have a vested interest in some outcome or other then they could tamper with the machine and no-one would know any better. In fact, we would all be thinking it was a secure system because of the "open" nature of it. These things aren't like our PCs, we can't just install VotingMachine From Scratch and be done with it.

Technology is dominated by those who manage what they do not understand.

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