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Comment: Re:Fonts are too small (Score 2, Insightful) 198

by dyefade (#31181436) Attached to: Enlightenment Returns To Bring Ubuntu To ARM

I'm not a Mac user who likes staring at the shiny toolbar renderings and 3D compositing effects while watching billable hours go by.

Nor am I, I'm a Mac user who gets on with his work. Congratulations on making wild generalisations based on the default animation style of a persons window manager...

Image

Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS In 24 Hours 107 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
r3lody writes "Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 Hours 8th edition, by Julie C. Meloni and Michael Morrison, provides the beginning and intermediate web designer with the tools needed to create standards-based web sites. The major focus of the book is XHTML 1.1 and CSS 2, but HTML 5 and some XHTML 1.0 are discussed. Overall, the presentation and content are very good. One small minus was that the publisher's site did not include downloadable examples from the book. I also found no errata until the latter parts of the book. Published in December of 2009, the 8th edition provides reasonably current information." Read on for Ray's review.

Comment: Re:Yet Another Reason (Score 1) 88

by dyefade (#30247074) Attached to: Massive Badware Campaign Targets Google's "Long Tail"

There are already abundant reasons not to give away your usage data to anyone who wants it; this just provides one more.

Please explain why you'd rather not reveal your referrer data. (New example from TFA aside.)
Working with web analytics, I can say referrer information is extremely useful, and not in a way which would lead you to any downsides, that I can think of at least.

(Not trolling, I'm genuinely interested...)

Comment: Re:I have a better idea (Score 1) 220

by dyefade (#29771245) Attached to: The Sad State of the Mobile Web

And gues wat? NOBODY visits any web site because it's "cool".

You're so wrong with this I don't know where to begin. The server logs from the company I work for, with their millions of hits and millions of £/€ in revenue strong suggest that you're utterly, irrecoverably wrong.

GP hit it perfectly the first time.

Cellphones

Nokia Fears Carriers May Try To Undermine N900 307

Posted by Soulskill
from the but-the-carriers-are-usually-so-helpful dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Nokia is worried that networks may reject selling the N900 because it won't allow them to mess with the operating system. Nokia has previously showed the N900 running a root shell and it appears to use the same interface for IM and phone functions. Meanwhile, Verizon is claiming that 'exclusivity arrangements promote competition and innovation.' Is it too late to explain to people why $99+$60/month is not better than $600+$20/month?"

Comment: Re:Compared to flash... (Score 1) 321

by dyefade (#28969121) Attached to: HTML 5 Canvas Experiment Hints At Things To Come

I did read it, the difference between you and I is that I understood what I was reading.

The original particle engine was ported from a Flex/AS3 project that weâ(TM)ve created to javascript. Weâ(TM)re using processing.js for particle rendering on canvas which is a very useful graphics library created by John Resig.

Processing.js is used to render Processing code, a subset of Java, not JavaScript. FFS, if you're going to accuse someone of not RTFM, at least be sure you did so yourself.

Comment: Re:Compared to flash... (Score 2, Interesting) 321

by dyefade (#28968711) Attached to: HTML 5 Canvas Experiment Hints At Things To Come

The demo uses processing.js - essentially a Java library. Whether this has any more utility than Flash (remembering that the flash of today is not the monstrosity most of /. seems to remember and think it still is) could be debated, but it's definitely more in line with standards compliance.

Graphics

HTML 5 Canvas Experiment Hints At Things To Come 321

Posted by timothy
from the faux-phlash dept.
An anonymous reader writes with an interesting and impressive demonstration of modern browsers' HTML 5 capabilities. "From the 9elements blog: 'HTML5 is getting a lot of love lately. With the arrival of Firefox 3.5, Safari 4 and the new 3.0 beta of Google Chrome, browsers support some great new features including canvas and the new audio/video tags. [...] We've created a little experiment which loads 100 tweets related to HTML 5 and displays them using a javascript-based particle engine.' The site warns "(beware: sophisticated browser needed)"; Firefox 3.5 seems to work fine.
Books

U of Michigan and Amazon To Offer 400,000 OOP Books 160

Posted by timothy
from the had-no-idea-so-many-people-loved-object-oriented-pumas dept.
eldavojohn writes "Four hundred thousand rare, out of print books may soon be available for purchase ranging anywhere from $10 to $45 apiece. The article lists a rare Florence Nightingale book on Nursing which normally sells for thousands due to its rarity. The [University of Michigan] librarian, Mr. Courant said, 'The agreement enables us to increase access to public domain books and other publications that have been digitised. We are very excited to be offering this service as a new way to increase access to the rich collections of the university library.' The University of Michigan has a library where Google is scanning rare books and was the aim of heavy criticism. (Some of the Google-scanned books are to be sold on Amazon.) How the authors guild and publishers react to Amazon's Surge offering softcover reprints of out of print books remains to be seen."

"Text processing has made it possible to right-justify any idea, even one which cannot be justified on any other grounds." -- J. Finnegan, USC.

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