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Comment: Is it legal? (Score 1) 479

by dwater (#48838321) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

I was made redundant from a well-respected company in Silicon Valley. As part of the package, they sent us to professional resume writers...one of the first things he said was that, if he was given a resume that detailed sex (as well as other things like 'age'), the resume would immediately be thrown in the bin. The reason was that there could be accusations of discrimination and that would make them legally 'exposed'.
It seems to me that companies are doing this openly these days...

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 479

by dwater (#48838255) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

You don't think there's anything inherently valuable in having a diverse work force? I can think of two reasons why it might be that it is valuable to the business as a whole to have as diverse a work force as possible; 1) you have a diverse selection of opinions/view points and so you're more likely to have someone who has the optimum solution to a problem; 2) perhaps you can target a wider set of customers?

I've no idea if they are actually true, but they seem self-evident to me. Those are off the top of my head - I imagine people who've studied the issues might come up with other reasons too.

Are these invalid somehow?

Comment: Re:What's the graduation rate for women? (Score 1) 479

by dwater (#48838127) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

> You *do* have to give girls the confidence that they can compete

That works for men/boys too - lack of self-confidence isn't restricted to the female dex. Although, I'm not sure how useful being able to compete is in the actual job...'back room boys' (or girls) are under-rated, imo.

Comment: Re:Anecdotes (Score 1) 479

by dwater (#48837757) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

I tend to agree that it is an issue with society rather than any instance of sexism...but *how* does one 'challenge larger cultural institutions'? I'm not convinced (yet) that positive discrimination is the right/only way - that seems equally sexist to me...but it seems to be the option chosen by employers.

If I were passed over for a position in favour of a women, when I was equally qualified (or even *more* qualified), then I would consider legal action. I suspect I wouldn't get very far though (several issues would be difficult to prove), but IMO it should be illegal.

Comment: Re:Honest question. (Score 1) 479

by dwater (#48837709) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

The reason women should (imo) flock to an IT/programming) career is that companies are positively discriminating towards women, such that it is (perhaps) almost impossible *not* to get a job - not so for men. At the very least, a women will be selected in favour of man, all other things being equal (which is impossible, but anyway).

Comment: Re:Honest question. (Score 1) 479

by dwater (#48836481) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

I've heard it argued that having a more even diversity (including male/female) improves the profit of the company. I can't argue that position too well myself, but I have to respect that as a reason.

The only reason I could see as backing up that assertion is that having diversity provides a wider range of view points, and so provides more options from which to choose - but that's a rather 'macro' view point, I suppose. It might be easy to imagine that having more women might make it easier for a company to accurately target women's need, for products or whatever....

Just throwing that out there...

Comment: open source project (Score 1) 133

by dwater (#46559211) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Moving From Tech Support To Development?

find an open source project that interests you and get involved, making sure your contributions are attributed to you; then you can point a potential employer at your work.

alternatively, in an appropriate point in the interview process (even in your letter of introduction), ask your potential employer to give you something to do as a project for a few weeks so that you can prove yourself and they can see what you can do.

Comment: Re:One of the first customers (Score 1) 113

by dwater (#46137927) Attached to: Sound System Simulates the Roar of a Rocket Launch

" ``It's the wild colour scheme that freaks me,'' said Zaphod whose love affair with this ship had lasted almost three minutes into the flight, ``Every time you try to operate on of these weird black controls that are labelled in black on a black background, a little black light lights up black to let you know you've done it. What is this? Some kind of galactic hyperhearse?''

The walls of the swaying cabin were also black, the ceiling was black, the seats --- which were rudimentary since the only important trip this ship was designed for was supposed to be unmanned --- were black, the control panel was black, the instruments were black, the little screws that held them in place were black, the thin tufted nylon floor covering was black, and when they had lifted up a corner of it they had discovered that the foam underlay also was black.
"

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