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Comment Re:And the purpose of this exercise is? (Score 0) 321 321

You are clearly not taking into account the upfront capital costs and bridge maintenance and repairs and changing political situations. Do that, amortise all those costs (real ones, not fake and improbably low ones) and try to answer the same question. A damaged boat doesn't prevent other boats from moving in the ocean and a boat can be used for other purposes if the political climate shuts down one route.

Comment And the purpose of this exercise is? (Score 0) 321 321

What are you going to move over that bridge that cannot be moved cheaper by a boat and faster by a plane?

Put a train on that maybe? What happens when a multi megaton train filled with oil (what else)? Goes off the rail there? There has to be an economic reason for anything like this, not a political one, because if it is all politics, it will be the most epic bridge to nowhere.

Come up with an economically sound reason first, before coming up with a solution like that.

Comment Re:The Onion had it right (Score 0) 110 110

As they say in Russian (a rough translation): saving those, who are drowning is up to those who are drowning. They also say: while you can hope that a god will help you, you should help yourself.

Basically there are enough people on the African continent to make it possible for those very people to figure out how to solve their own problems. I don't see African solutions to problems in Indonesia related to Avian Flu as an example.

Comment Re:When do I get to be a multinational corp? (Score 0) 324 324

Of-course people have these rights. You, as a person, have the right (meaning that you cannot be oppressed by government) to move out of a country and do your business in such a way as to minimise your taxes. Not having an entitlement to do that does not mean you do not, as a person, have the right (protection against government oppression).

Not being able to afford something does not mean you don't have a right to do it, having the right to do it does not mean you are also supposed to be given an entitlement to afford doing it.

Your lack of understanding of the concept of rights is not unique, most people don't get it.

Comment Re:When do I get to be a multinational corp? (Score 0) 324 324

That lack of global jurisdiction is used by both the rich and the multinational corps to skirt laws and taxation that are unfavorable to them in their home country.

- which is an extremely important right of people, the right not to be enslaved and kept in any particular country against their own will, the right to freedom of association, of private property, liberty and life.

Comment Compassion in exchange for rationality? (Score 0) 110 110

Compassion very often requires that rationality is disregarded and even thrown away. Also ideas of compassion are often used to play the mob and destroy individual human rights. Compassion is a very dangerous emotion that leads to conflicts and wars in real life. Maybe AI and robots should be instructed to follow a Constitution instead, that would define individuals as the highest form of life and individual rights as absolute (right not tone murdered by government, right not to be imprisoned by government, right not to be robbed by government). Then criminal code could be added (authority of justice system to isolate a violent individual to protect against murder, assault, rape, robbery).

Compassion will lead to conflict, class warfare, violence. Constitution and criminal code will lead to some form of peace. Be careful with compassion, it is used to justify most vile acts on this planet.

Comment Re:Morse Code (Score 1) 618 618

Oh, wait, you didn't need to pass a test for that.

I'm just trying to think how that would have been possible. I think back then there was a medical exception you could plead for. I didn't. I passed the 20 WPM test fair and square and got K6BP as a vanity call, long before there was any way to get that call without passing a 20 WPM test.

Unfortunately, ARRL did fight to keep those code speeds in place, and to keep code requirements, for the last several decades that I know of and probably continuously since 1936. Of course there was all of the regulation around incentive licensing, where code speeds were given a primary role. Just a few years ago, they sent Rod Stafford to the final IARU meeting on the code issue with one mission: preventing an international vote for removal of S25.5 . They lost.

I am not blaming this on ARRL staff and officers. Many of them have privately told me of their support, including some directors and their First VP, now SK. It's the membership that has been the problem.

I am having a lot of trouble believing the government agency and NGO thing, as well. I talked with some corporate emergency managers as part of my opposition to the encryption proceeding (we won that too, by the way, and I dragged an unwilling ARRL, who had said they would not comment, into the fight). Big hospitals, etc.

What I got from the corporate folks was that their management was resistant to using Radio Amateurs regardless of what the law was. Not that they were chomping at the bit waiting to be able to carry HIPAA-protected emergency information via encrypted Amateur radio. Indeed, if you read the encryption proceeding, public agencies and corporations hardly commented at all. That point was made very clearly in FCC's statement - the agencies that were theorized by Amateurs to want encryption didn't show any interest in the proceeding.

So, I am having trouble believing that the federal agency and NGO thing is real because of that.

Comment Insane government (Score 1, Insightful) 484 484

reduce the country's reliance on nuclear power from 75% to 50% by 2025.

- ok, stupid but doable.

reducing the country's greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030, compared to the level in 1990.

- ok, by itself it does not mean anything, as it doesn't say how that is supposed to be done. But together with the first statement (reducing nuclear power) looks suspiciously contradictory.

The new law aims to eventually halve France's energy consumption by 2050 from the 2012 level.

- WHAT?????

Ok, unless the goal is to half the population and production by 2050 from the 2012 levels while simultaneously switching to non-nuclear power, that's one thing. But if the goal is also to reduce 'green house gas emissions'...

Explain this to me: half the energy consumption, reduce reliance on nuclear power and at the same time reduce green house emissions.

Unless the real goal there is to reduce population then I have a bridge to sell you.

I also may want a unicorn and a tooth fairy and I can even enact legislation about it but legislation that requires unicorns and tooth fairies to become available to me upon the request by the authorities cannot in fact magically produce unicorns and tooth fairies!

Comment Re:Morse Code (Score 1) 618 618

The Technican Element 3 test wasn't more difficult than the Novice Element 1 and 2 together, so Technican became the lowest license class when they stopped having to take Element 1.

The change to 13 WPM was in 1936, and was specifically to reduce the number of Amateur applicants. It was 10 WPM before that. ARRL asked for 12.5 WPM in their filing, FCC rounded the number because they felt it would be difficult to set 12.5 on the Instructograph and other equipment available for code practice at the time.

It was meant to keep otherwise-worthy hams out of the hobby. And then we let that requirement keep going for 60 years.

The Indianapolis cop episode was back in 2009. It wasn't the first time we've had intruders, and won't be the last, and if you have to reach back that long for an example, the situation can't be that bad. It had nothing to do with code rules or NGOs getting their operators licenses.

A satphone is less expensive than a trained HF operator. Iridium costs $30 per month and $0.89 per minute to call another Iridium phone. That's the over-the-counter rate. Government agencies get a better rate than that. And the phone costs $1100, again that's retail not the government rate, less than an HF rig with antenna and tower will cost any public agency to install.

You think it's a big deal to lobby against paid operators because there will be objections? How difficult do you think it was to reform the code regulations? Don't you think there were lots of opposing comments?

And you don't care about young people getting into Amateur Radio. That's non-survival thinking.

Fortunately, when the real hams go to get something done, folks like you aren't hard to fight, because you don't really do much other than whine and send in the occassional FCC comment. Do you know I even spoke in Iceland when I was lobbying against the code rules? Their IARU vote had the same power as that of the U.S., and half of the hams in the country came to see me. That's how you make real change.

All syllogisms have three parts, therefore this is not a syllogism.

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