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Comment: What about Europeans? (Score 2) 401

by durgledoggy (#46201731) Attached to: Leonard Nimoy: Smoking Is Illogical
What about Europeans and people from other parts of the world where tobacco products can't be marketed, cigarettes and nicotine products have to be hidden from view? People still smoke, people still start smoking. No marketing happening to them though. All the current evidence suggests that hiding tobacco products and banning smoking in certain places is not stopping people smoke nor reducing the number of new smokers.

Besides, what ever happened to people doing what they enjoy? Some smokers do feel trapped sadly, but not all. Many do it because they enjoy it.

+ - Tesla's Elon Musk Envisions 4000MPH 'Hyperloop' Transportation System->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "Think the future of transportation has us all in flying cars like the Jetsons? Think again. That's not something we're likely to see in our lifetime, however we may witness the completion of several "Hyperloop" transport systems designed to get you from point A to point B at breakneck speeds. This is the dream of Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk, who describes Hyperloop as a "cross between a Concorde, a rail gun, and an air hockey table." Alternately, you can think of it as an enclosed tube that's propped way up off the ground. It would use a magnetic levitation system similar to high-speed bullet trains, except passengers would travel in capsules across a surface with almost no friction. A Colorado company called ET3 (Evacuated Tube Transport) is already working on making Musk's dream a reality by building a similar system and is planning a 3-mile trial run before the end of the year. This is just the beginning of bigger and faster things to come, According to ET3, a six-passenger capsule about the size of an automobile could hit speeds of 4,000 miles per hour on longer distances, such as going across the country or even continents."
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+ - Hardly Anyone Is Buying 'Smart Guns'->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "The technology is here. So-called "smart guns" are being programmed to recognize a gun owner’s identity and lock up if the weapon ends up in the wrong hands. Entrepreneurs and engineers have been developing technology to make safer guns since the early '90s, and by now we've got working prototypes of guns that read fingerprints, hand grips or even sensors embedded under the skin. But after 15 years of innovation, personalized guns still haven't penetrated the marketplace."
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+ - New Computational Model Can Predict Breast Cancer Survival->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Columbia Engineering researchers, led by Dimitris Anastassiou, Charles Batchelor Professor in Electrical Engineering and member of the Columbia Initiative in Systems Biology, have developed a new computational model that is highly predictive of breast cancer survival."
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+ - Localized (visual) programming language for kids?

Submitted by jimshatt
jimshatt (1002452) writes "I want my kids to play around with programming languages. To teach them basic concepts like loops and subroutines and the likes. My 8-year old daughter in particular. I've tried Scratch and some other visual languages, but I think she might be turned off by the English language. Having to learn English as well as a programming language at the same time might be just a little too much.
I'd really like to have a programming language that is easy to learn, and localized or localizable. Preferably cross-platform, or browser-based, so she can show her work at school (Windows) as well as work on in at home (Debian Linux).
By the way, she speaks Dutch and Danish, so preferably one of those languages (but if it's localizable I can translate it myself).

Any suggestions?"

+ - Former Sega employee reveals Sega Pluto prototype console->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A new Sega console has been revealed, albeit it an old one that never made it past the prototype stage.

The console is called the Sega Pluto, and apparently only two prototype units were ever made. As for what’s inside the Sega Pluto, it looks to be a modified Saturn that includes the NetLink 28.8kbit/s modem as standard. It allowed Saturn consoles to be linked up using a dial-up connection for multiplayer gaming. A disc has also been found by another user that is an internal Sega Saturn CD-R that holds a terminal specifically for Pluto."

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Privacy

+ - Petition for a Better Ubuntu->

Submitted by lads
lads (1102553) writes "So today I propose to tackle this issue in a different way, creating a Petition addressed at Canonical, exhorting the company to quit any default data collection features. Below is the integral text of the Petition for a Better Ubuntu; if you're in tune, please jump to Avaaz and sign it."
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GNU is Not Unix

+ - Ubuntu Community Manager: RMS's post seems a bit childish to me->

Submitted by spacenet
spacenet (2555388) writes "As a response to RMS speaking out against Ubuntu about its privacy-violating integrated Amazon search results, which he considers to be spyware, Ubuntu Community Manager Jono Bacon has responded to RMS's post. In his reply, Jono claims that Stallman's views on privacy do not align with Canonical's, that some of his statements are worded in order to "generate fear, uncertainty, and doubt about Ubuntu" and that "it just seems a bit childish to me".

The comments on the post itself are well worth a read."

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+ - Sir Patrick Moore dies aged 89-> 3

Submitted by Tastecicles
Tastecicles (1153671) writes "Patrick Moore was the monocled surveyor of the sky who awakened in millions of people an interest in galactic goings on.

His love of astronomy began at the age of six and that childhood curiosity developed into a lifelong passion.

It was a passion he shared through his programme, The Sky at Night, which he presented for more than 50 years, only ever missing one episode due to illness.

Patrick Alfred Caldwell-Moore was born at Pinner, Middlesex on 4 Mar 1923.

Heart problems meant he spent much of his childhood being educated at home and he became an avid reader.

His mother gave him a copy of GF Chambers' book, The Story of the Solar System, and this sparked his lifelong passion for astronomy.

He was soon publishing papers about the moon's surface, based on observations made with his first three-inch telescope. His 1908 vintage typewriter enabled him to publish more than a thousand books on subjects ranging from astronomy, his first love, to cricket, golf, and music."

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Medicine

+ - Stay Home When You're Sick!

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "If you've got Google CEO Larry Page's billions, you can reduce your chances of getting sick this winter by personally providing free flu shots to all San Francisco Bay Area kids at Target pharmacies. 'Vaccinating children,' explains the Shoo the Flu initiative's website, 'will not only improve children's health, it will also dramatically reduce the risk of the flu spreading to adults.' But Tim Olshansky doesn't have Page's money, so he'll have to settle for trying to get it through people's thick heads that they really have to stay home when they're sick. 'Why do people still come to the office when they're coughing up a lung?' asks the exasperated Olshansky. 'Because unfortunately, there is a still a strong perverse culture that equates staying at home when sick with weakness. This is a flawed belief and should be questioned. Given that we have the tools now to complete most tasks from home, there is no strong reason to compel people to come to the workplace.' So, does your employer encourage employees to stay home when they're sick? How?"

+ - How Yucca Mountain was Killed->

Submitted by ATKeiper
ATKeiper (141486) writes "The Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, which was selected by the U.S. government in the 1980s to be the nation’s permanent facility for storing nuclear waste, is essentially dead. A new article in The New Atlantis explains how the project was killed: 'In the end, the Obama administration succeeded, by a combination of legal authority and bureaucratic will, in blocking Congress’s plan for the Yucca Mountain repository — certainly for the foreseeable future, and perhaps permanently.... The saga of Yucca Mountain’s creation and apparent demise, and of the seeming inability of the courts to prevent the Obama administration from unilaterally nullifying the decades-old statutory framework for Yucca, illustrates how energy infrastructure is uniquely subject to the control of the executive branch, and so to the influence of presidential politics.' A report from the Government Accountability Office notes that the termination 'essentially restarts a time-consuming and costly process [that] has already cost nearly $15 billion through 2009.'"
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