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Comment: Re:OT: I have a small feature request for car-make (Score 1) 91

by drinkypoo (#48471157) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

If a hacker can do all that, why can't the car itself open the windows slightly if the temperature inside gets high and there is no rain outside?

It's safer to just put a solar panel on the roof, my car has it integrated into the sunroof. When the interior temperature rises sufficiently and the panel is sunlit then it runs the blower motor to keep the car cool. Sadly, it ignores the ambient temperature sensor and has no concept of humidity, so in some conditions the sun can hit your car, heat it up before the surroundings, and suck damp cold air into the vehicle and humidify it. In the normal course of the day, though, it will blow warm air through after it, and the air at least comes through the cabin air filters.

Comment: Re:Overkill! (Score 1) 91

by drinkypoo (#48471133) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

Or, much more likely, you actually don't do any of this.

Probably not. But the springs break in lots of Mercedes seats, and so they're candidates too. A lot of people shore them up with a pool noodle. If you can find a fairly compatible spring, you can splice it into the broken section from below after removing the seat without even having to pull the upholstery, which you don't want to do.

Comment: Re:No useless technology, better security (Score 1) 91

by drinkypoo (#48471125) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

Cars should not be as Ford says "A computer on wheels".

Ah yes, Ford. They went to 32-bit PCMs when Hitachi at least (and Bosch too, I think) was still using 6800-family chips. A computer on wheels, indeed.

How about simple reliable cars that people can actually afford to buy.

Like a Ford Fiesta?

Comment: Re:Copyright? (Score 1) 114

by drinkypoo (#48470961) Attached to: Jackie Chan Discs Help Boost Solar Panel Efficiency

Yea, at this rate of efficiency gains it'll only be ANOTHER 30 years until they're economical.

You are a troll, yes? You know that thin film PV panels pay back the energy cost of their production in three years? And that even though PV solar is the least energy-efficient, it's profitable right now? You must be a troll, there can't be anybody out there who doesn't know this stuff.

Comment: Re:First rule of computer security!!! (Score 1) 91

by drinkypoo (#48470929) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

Most cars cost multiple thousands of dollars

This does not appear to be a reply to my comment, but that's where you left it. Care to expound, or are you simply schizophrenic? The fact that cars cost multiple thousands of dollars is the reason why it's worth it to spend a grand or more on tools for stealing them. Get some easy scores from cars without good security, work your way up, like any other job.

Comment: Re:Can Iowa handle a circus that large? (Score 1) 363

by drinkypoo (#48470891) Attached to: Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Considering US Presidential Run

I didn't say it went away, it may and probably has shifted to where it is.

No, no it hasn't. The left is still where it always was, and so is the right. We still have the same degree of far leftists and far rightists that we've always had. What we have is different proportions, but that doesn't actually change what the left and right are. It only makes the democrats liars when they claim to be leftist, since they are centrists.

Comment: Re:He definitely did know and understand the risk. (Score 1) 141

by drinkypoo (#48470871) Attached to: Kim Dotcom Regrets Not Taking Copyright Law and MPAA "More Seriously"

Who is being disingenuous here?

You, if you either claim not to know what the "copyright cartel" is, or claim to be interested in copyright. Both cannot reasonably be true.

Why would they make a profit when anyone who does a quick google for what they're selling would find it for half price or even less from someone else?

Because they get the money up front, that's how this sort of thing works, you are not very smart.

But there's no competition from the "copyright cartel". They can't stop you from making your movie or distributing it.

Wow, you're staggeringly stupid. People aren't going to pay for movies up front when they have the option to pay for movies which have already been made, because they are too stupid to realize that in the current system, they're paying for movies that they're not even watching. That's called competition, boy. Here's a nickel, you don't need it to access dictionary.com.

Comment: Re:He definitely did know and understand the risk. (Score 1) 141

by drinkypoo (#48468807) Attached to: Kim Dotcom Regrets Not Taking Copyright Law and MPAA "More Seriously"

Nothing in the "copyright cartel" (whatever that is supposed to be)

When will you learn to use the internets, including important features like a search engine? But frankly, I believe that your obtuseness is entirely disingenuous. You cannot have an interest in this subject and not be familiar with that phrase.

What does stop people from doing this is the knowledge the people who actually have the money to do such a thing have: that they'd be spending a lot of money and never get it back.

Of course they would. They'd make a profit, too. They might not be able to make the kind of fuck-you profits they make now, not least through that aforementioned creative accounting.

No, it isn't a viable model. THAT'S why nobody has done it yet. Not because of some mythical "copyright cartel" that prevents someone from doing it.

It's not about prevention. It's about not being able to compete with someone who is successfully gaming the system.

Comment: Re:First rule of computer security!!! (Score 1) 91

by drinkypoo (#48468787) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

The radio is not a radio any more, it's a control unit (in many cases) and it changes powertrain and suspension settings. it legitimately needs to be able to communicate with stuff that's on that bus. But it should be doing it through a gateway which only permits the necessary signals...

I want remote features, but nobody should be able to drive away with the vehicle without actually having the key, and nobody should be able to reflash the vehicle without actually physically accessing it. Once they are in, though, there's very little you can do to prevent them. For cars which cost multiple thousands of dollars, it's not difficult to imagine someone spending a few hundred on a PCM and a couple hundred per model they want to steal making up a harness ahead of time which will operate any vehicle but the very fanciest without discussing starting the engine with the immobilizer at all. Preventing them from accessing it is also preventing a tech from doing so...

Comment: Re:Can Iowa handle a circus that large? (Score 1) 363

by drinkypoo (#48468427) Attached to: Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Considering US Presidential Run

Your measure of left and right does not match up with American political norms. Now if your basing it on outside U.S., that's fine, but it doesn't play here.

Bullshit. The far left is still here in the US, it's just been equated with terrists by loudmouths in red states living off tax money from blue states.

Comment: Re:First rule of computer security!!! (Score 1) 91

by drinkypoo (#48468331) Attached to: Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

If you can't do that, then at the very least don't let a hacker turn my engine off while I'm driving down the free way. Some features are simply not worth that vulnerability.

The sad part is that preventing this is really easy by following some basic principles of networking and security like properly sanitizing your inputs. But they're just not used to even having to think about that at all at the companies which build the PCMs. Some vehicles are clever enough to have a communications gateway in between systems but who trusts the gateways?

Comment: Re:In Finland (Score 1) 459

by drinkypoo (#48466375) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Wooden houses as opposed to what? I don't think a well built wooden house is at all a problem in an earthquake zone.

No, it's just a problem in a fire zone, which in the USA tend to correspond closely with earthquake zones. Building flammable houses on a grassland or in woods is daft.

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