Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Another liberal dream goes totalitarian (Score 2, Informative) 439

by drewish_princess (#29056407) Attached to: EFF Says Burning Man Usurps Digital Rights

i know this is slashdot where talking out of your ass gets you modded as insightful but this is just too stupid to pass by.

you've clearly never been to the event and have no appreciation of its history. i grew up in reno i went for the first time in 1996. at that time there were only 8,000 people (at least according to wikipedia) last year there were 49,500. there's absolutely no way you can scale that without changing the rules. i remember talking to people that we upset that there was no more drive by shooting range. there was a rave camp a mile from central camp and everyone drove their cars around. and that year three people in a tent got run over by a car, so the next year only art cars were allowed and a speed limit imposed.

they don't make rules just to make rules. the rules are either: a) responses to clear problems to keeping the ever increasing number of people from killing each other b) imposed by the counties (washoe and pershing) or blm in order to obtain the permits.

Comment: ~29-year-old Heathkit H19 terminal (Score 1) 622

by drewish_princess (#28134939) Attached to: 45-Year-Old Modem Used To Surf the Web

I've got a Heathkit H19 dumb terminal on my desk that's hooked up to my MacMini via serial-to-USB converter.

I don't do a lot of "work" with it but I wrote a Ruby script for it to talk to iTunes via AppleScript and grab the album art then pass that through ImageMagick to bump the contrast then convert it to ASCII text using jp2a.

You can see some pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drewish/tags/h19/
Or checkout the Ruby script: http://github.com/drewish/textFlow/tree/master

Debian

Ubuntu 9.04 Is As Slick As Win7, Mac OS X 871

Posted by kdawson
from the continuous-improvement dept.
An anonymous reader writes in with an opinion piece from ZDNet Australia. "Here's what the official press release won't tell you about Ubuntu 9.04, which formally hit the streets yesterday: its designers have polished the hell out of its user interface since the last release in October. Just like Microsoft has taken the blowtorch to Vista to produce the lightning-quick Windows 7, which so far runs well even on older hardware, Ubuntu has picked up its own game."

Comment: Re:They learned it by watching the government. (Score 1) 346

by drewish_princess (#27572221) Attached to: Ponzi Schemes Multiply On YouTube

"Over here, we (at least we did) believe in personal resposibility, the individual, and taking care of your own."

I had to laugh at that. For the last sixty years the idea seems to have been take credit for the successes and blame the failures on bad luck then ask for a bailout.

Patents

Drug Giant Pledges Cheap Medicine For World's Poor 317

Posted by kdawson
from the shamed-into-it dept.
bmsleight writes in with a Guardian piece on the decision of the world's second biggest pharmaceutical company, GlaxoSmithKline, to radically shift its attitude towards providing cheap drugs to millions of people in the developing world. "[The new CEO] said that GSK will... cut its prices for all drugs in the 50 least developed countries to no more than 25% of the levels in the UK and US — and less if possible — and make drugs more affordable in middle-income countries such as Brazil and India; put any chemicals or processes over which it has intellectual property rights that are relevant to finding drugs for neglected diseases into a 'patent pool,' so they can be explored by other researchers; and reinvest 20% of any profits it makes in the least developed countries in hospitals, clinics, and staff."
Security

Do We Need a New Internet? 690

Posted by kdawson
from the alarmist-or-cassandra dept.
Richard.Tao and a number of other readers sent in a NYTimes piece by John Markoff asking whether the Internet is so broken it needs to be replaced. "...[T]here is a growing belief among engineers and security experts that Internet security and privacy have become so maddeningly elusive that the only way to fix the problem is to start over. What a new Internet might look like is still widely debated, but one alternative would, in effect, create a 'gated community' where users would give up their anonymity and certain freedoms in return for safety. Today that is already the case for many corporate and government Internet users. As a new and more secure network becomes widely adopted, the current Internet might end up as the bad neighborhood of cyberspace. You would enter at your own risk and keep an eye over your shoulder while you were there." A less alarmist reaction to the question was blogged by David Akin: "If you build a new Internet and you want me to get a license to drive on it, sorry. I'm hanging out here in v.1."

Phantom OS, the 21st Century OS? 553

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the more-ways-to-shoot-your-foot dept.
jonr writes "Phantom OS doesn't have files. Well, there are no files in the sense that a developer opens a file handle, writes to it, and closes the file handle. From the user's perspective, things still look familiar — a desktop, directories, and file icons. But a file in Phantom is simply an object whose state is persisted. You don't have to explicitly open it. As long as your program has some kind of reference to that object, all you need to do is call methods on it, and the data is there as you would expect."

Comment: Re:Always the dutch .... (Score 1) 336

by drewish_princess (#26523171) Attached to: Dutch Study Says Filesharing Has Positive Economic Effects

I think you'd have a hard time finding an example of "good" colonizers but you seemed to have picked up the wrong end of 3.5 stripe's comment. You're looking at their profit while he's looking at the effects on the people in the countries where those profits were generated.

The Military

Virus Infection Hits UK's Ministry of Defense, Including Warships 290

Posted by timothy
from the but-not-windows-for-warships-per-se dept.
Retrovirus writes with a link to a Register story which says that the UK's "Ministry of Defence confirmed today that it has suffered virus infections which have shut down 'a small number' of MoD systems, most notably including admin networks aboard Royal Navy warships."
Power

Distributed "Nuclear Batteries" the New Infrastructure Answer? 611

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the not-in-my-backyard dept.
thepacketmaster writes "The Star reports about a new power generation model using smaller distributed power generators located closer to the consumer. This saves money on power generation lines and creates an infrastructure that can be more easily expanded with smaller incremental steps, compared to bigger centralized power generation projects. The generators in line for this are green sources, but Hyperion Power Generation, NuScale, Adams Atomic Engines (and some other companies) are offering small nuclear reactors to plug into this type of infrastructure. The generator from Hyperion is about the size of a garden shed, and uses older technology that is not capable of creating nuclear warheads, and supposedly self-regulating so it won't go critical. They envision burying reactors near the consumers for 5-10 years, digging them back up and recycling them. Since they are so low maintenance and self-contained, they are calling them nuclear batteries."
The Internet

Broadband Access Without the Pork? 412

Posted by timothy
from the yessir-that's-the-mandatory-federal-barbeque-fee dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Like many consumers nowadays, I find more of my time spent on the internet and various wireless devices (e.g. mobile phone). This has gotten to the point where I basically do not use a landline or cable television anymore, and they are essentially pork on my broadband bill, which further subjects the consumer to all sorts of clandestine fees that aren't disclosed until the first bill arrives and add a non-trivial sum (in my case, nearly 100%) to the monthly rate. However, it seems that all broadband access providers have this stipulation, that an internet customer must first have a basic phone or cable TV service in order to sign on for the internet service. Are there any ISPs that can get around this and still deliver broadband internet service at a competitive rate?"

When you are working hard, get up and retch every so often.

Working...