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Comment: clickbait study (Score 2) 105

by TheCarp (#48470743) Attached to: Bitcoin Is Not Anonymous After All

I find it hillarious that they so easily conclude tor doesn't fill these gaps because they deem it too easy to break. That right there is some pretty extraordinary claim, I would want to see them do it if its so easy.

I don't think there is any evidence that tor, in this particular use case, is actually so easy to break. So far all evidence is that weaknesses lie in the services behind hidden services, in browsers used to use web based services in particular, and potentially in hidden services themselves.

A bitcoin node transmitting transactions really should be pretty safe, and if they have any evidence to the contrary, that would be much more interesting than their hand waving clickbait claims.

Comment: Re:It's a (Score 4, Insightful) 18

by hey! (#48470135) Attached to: Fly With the Brooklyn Aerodrome (Video)

piece of crap with propellor

That's the interesting part.

This is what engineering is about: meeting a need cost effectively. The point of a toy RC airplane is to have fun. Traditionally it was expensive fun that didn't last very very long before you crashed. Having fun for longer with less $$ outlay == better engineering.

Comment: "Steam" is only half the salary equation (Score 4, Insightful) 258

by hey! (#48469173) Attached to: Is Ruby On Rails Losing Steam?

Specifically: the demand curve half of the equation. The other half is the supply curve. A platform can have *no steam whatsoever*, but so few programmers that the salaries are reasonably high.

Consider Delphi programming. I see Delphi positions come up once in a blue moon -- it's not used much any longer. But those salaries run from $80K to $110K plus. Sometimes you see a Delphi position come up in the mid 40s, but I suspect they're government positions.

I've seen listings for COBOL or PoweBuilder programmers both in the $60K to $110K plus range. You can bet when a company offers $110K for a PowerBuilder programmer it's because it's having a hard time finding one.

Comment: I blame it on the Moon landing. (Score 3, Insightful) 484

by hey! (#48467757) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

July 20, 1969 was, possibly justifiably, the biggest national ego-validation event in human history. The problem was after that when it came to national achievement, our eyes were firmly pointed back in time. We no longer do things "because they are hard". We're more focused on cashing in on the achievements of past generations.

When you tell Americans we have a backward mobile telephone system, a technologically primitive electric grid and distribution system, and Internet connectivity that lags behind the rest of the developed world, the reaction is usually disbelief. How can that be? We put a man on the Moon -- although by now it should be "grandpa put a man on the Moon."

Comment: Re:Ross Perot is awesome! (Score 1) 122

by hey! (#48467433) Attached to: How the World's First Computer Was Rescued From the Scrap Heap

He was also a conspiracy theorist who had the money to indulge his paranoid fantasies.

He had the phones of his own employees tapped. He hired private investigators to spy on his friends and family, and to dig up dirt on friends of his children he didn't approve of. He went beserk when he found out the designer of the Vietnam Memorial was an Asian American, calling her racial slurs and hiring lawyers to harass the veterans who supported her.

This is a man who thinks that both the Carter and Reagan administrations conspired to hide the presence of hundreds of POW in Southeast Asia.

I often tell my kids "there's no kind of dumb like a smart person's dumb." It's a warning against arrogance. Smart people can get too used to being right when other people around them are wrong. But in truth there is a worse kind of dumb: rich person's dumb. That's because money can give ideas instant credibility with people in a way arguments cannot. There's a strong inclination in this country to idolize rich guys.

Comment: Re:Aerial or underground ? (Score 1) 484

by geekoid (#48467039) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Well gosh, I guess you solved it. There are any any issues that can happen with buried power lines.
Root never wrap around them, animals never nibble at them. the moisture in the soil is the same every where, as well as the microbe that live in the soil, and the ground never freezes, And street will part so you can just lay the wires underneath them.

I'll rush down stair to tell the engineers you have solved this issue.

Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. -- Bill Vaughn

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