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Submission + - Swedes Discover Spherical Object Embedded in Baltic Sea Floor ( 2

An anonymous reader writes: Swedish sea scavengers revealed a curious discovery — a disc-shaped object, roughly 60 metres in diameter, and rising about 4 metres out of the seabed, with a 400-metre trail leading to its position.
A lack of detailed photographs has caused speculation that this may be nothing more than a hoax, or information campaign, but there is a promise of more details, from the crew, as they uncover their find with better equipment.


Submission + - Monsanto may have to repay 10 years of GM soya royalties in Brazil (

scibri writes: Biotech giant Monsanto is one step closer to losing billions of dollars in revenues from its genetically-modified Roundup Ready soya beans, after the Brazilian Supreme Court ruled the company must repay royalties collected over the past decade.

Since GM crops were legalized in 2005, Monsanto has charged Brazilian farmers royalties of 2% on their sales of Roundup Ready soya beans. The company also tests Brazilian soya beans that are sold as non-GM — if they turn out to be Roundup Ready, the company charges the farmers 3%. Farmers challenged this as an an unjust tax on their business.

In April a regional court ruled against Monsanto, though that ruling has been put on hold pending an appeal. The Supreme Court, meanwhile has said that whatever the final ruling is, it will apply throughout the whole country.


Submission + - Did Neandertals Paint Early Cave Art? (

sciencehabit writes: Dating experts working in Spain, using a technique relatively new to archaeology, have pushed dates for the earliest cave art back some 4000 years to at least 41,000 years ago, raising the possibility that the artists were Neandertals rather than modern humans. And a few researchers say that the study argues for the slow development of artistic skill over tens of thousands of year--not a swift aquisition of talent, as some had argued.

Submission + - Google Mail now blocked in China

An anonymous reader writes: For some time, access to Gmail has been deliberately "delayed" in China.
Since about 6pm on Friday, local time it has been completely blocked. The login screen "may" come up, but login itself just times out.

Submission + - China arrested a CIA spy (

Taco Cowboy writes: A 38-year-old Chinese national, who was a secretary to Qiu Jin, the deputy minister of state security, is alleged to have been recruited and trained by the CIA and was arrested by the Chinese authority sometime this year

It was reported that the man was approached by the CIA while he was a student studying in the USA

To "cement" the relationship, the CIA arranged a classic "honey trap", where the guy was photographed with a woman in a compromising setting in a Hong Kong apartment. And with that, the guy is coerced into spying for the CIA

Submission + - SETI reasearch with Very Large Baseline Interferometry (

An anonymous reader writes: Radio astronomers in Australia have tried a to detect a transmission from Gliese 581 using Very Large Baseline Interferometry with the Australian Large Baseline Array The star Gliese 581 (Gl581) is 20 light years away and is orbited by at least two planets in habitable zone. While the astronomers haven't detected any signal from Gl581, they have derived a limit on the strength of the signal that could be detected from Earth. In simple terms, if a transmitter like Arecibo would have been in operation in the Gl581 system and beaming in our direction, the signal would have been picked.
This is a breakthrough method to examine extraterrestrial transmissions and will be implemented with the Square Kilometre Array, the gigantic radio interferometer that will be built in South Africa and Australia. With this technique, the SKA will lift the SETI exploration to an amazing new regime.

Submission + - White House responds to ACTA petition (

hguorbray writes: Predictably tepid response from the Whitehouse saying that they want to hear from all stakeholders -unfortunately 'he who has the gold makes the rules' will continue to prevail and it will probably take more than the 50k petition signers to make the people's voices be heard

Submission + - Dead Trigger Probes Boundaries Of iOS And Android Graphics (

buffdaily247 writes: Games like Dead Trigger have to make iOS and Android fans smile, then give the finger to console players convinced there's no future in mobile. Here we have a shockingly beautiful first-person shooter from Madfinger Games (of Shadowgun fame) that looks similar to Valve's Left 4 Dead series. Scratch that, it looks even better.

Submission + - Redesigned cooler reinvents tuberculosis treatment (

sarfralogy writes: "It started with a basic soft drink cooler, a need for easier management of tuberculosis and $150,000 in innovation support.
A big challenge in managing tuberculosis is keeping the medicine cool, in addition to tracking and monitoring dose administration. These challenges can be life-threatening, especially in less-developed countries, where refrigerators and fancy cooling devices are rare; ice must be trucked in on a daily basis to keep medicines at controlled temperatures. A redesigned cooler with the ability to keep the medicine cool and record when medicine is dispensed is aiming to solve both these problems.
The design of the cooler is simple and practical — common characteristics of a scientifically sound experiment or innovation. It’s nothing more than a standard soft drink cooler but the team from MIT's Little Devices Lab equipped the cooler with the ability to sound an alert when the temperature inside the cooler becomes too high and transmit data wirelessly using a cellphone transmitter whenever the cooler is opened."


Submission + - U-M takes important strides in research and sustainable computing (

An anonymous reader writes: The University of Michigan is putting the finishing touches on a new eco-friendly data center, known as the Modular Data Center.

The new data center houses high-performance computing equipment in a compact container the size of several shipping containers. It also uses outdoor air instead of expensive, industrial air conditioners to cool equipment. The MDC's innovative design promotes sustainable computing, and U-M is the first university in the nation to build this kind of structure.

A traditional data center reuses the hot air generated by the computing equipment; chilling it and then delivering it back into the computing equipment.

"Rather than running what amounts to a very expensive air conditioner all year long, the MDC allows us to essentially open the windows during the colder months, and limit air conditioning to the few months in the summer when we really need it," said Andy Palms, director of communications systems and data centers at U-M.

In a typical data center, the energy cost for cooling can be twice the cost of power dedicated to computing. The use of ambient air significantly reduces the amount of energy needed to cool the computers. In comparison to a traditional data center like the Michigan Academic Computing Center, the MDC could potentially save $50,000 per month in energy costs—$600,000 over an entire year.

The MDC is just one of a few different kinds of data centers at U-M. Each data center offers different levels of security and reliability, depending on the nature of the computing work performed. For example, some data, such as financial or health research, requires high security and reliability (constant monitoring and generator back-up in case of power outages). In some cases, the data processing or the data itself is less sensitive and does not require the same costly environment. The MDC is specifically designed to deliver cost-effective, high-performance computing cycles.

"Expanding our capability for computationally rich research is a priority for the University of Michigan," said Laura Patterson, chief information officer and associate vice president at U-M. "The MDC helps support the broad range of our research community's needs, while being mindful of cost and energy efficiencies. It's an important milestone for the university's leadership in research, technology and sustainability."

The Modular Data Center project was made possible through the joint efforts of Information and Technology Services, Office of Research Cyberinfrastructure, and Architecture, Engineering and Construction. Capital funding was provided by the U-M Office of the Provost.

U-M Modular Data Center:


Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What to do with a Math Degree? 6

badmojo17 writes: After achieving her lifelong dream of becoming a public school math teacher, my wife has found the profession to be much more frustrating than she ever expected. She could deal with having a group of disrespectful criminals as students if she had competent administrators supporting her, but the sad truth is that her administration causes more problems on a daily basis than her students do. Our question is this: what other professions are open to a bright young woman with a bachelor's degree in math and a master's degree in education? Without further education, what types of positions or companies might be interested in her as an employee?

Submission + - Google to Require Retailers to Pay to be in Google Shopping Results (

gambit3 writes: "In a move to squeeze more cash out of its lucrative Web-search engine, Google is converting its free product-search service into a paid one.
Online retailers will now have to bid to display their products on Google's Shopping site. Currently, retailers include their products for free by providing Google with certain data about the products. Google then ranks those products, such as cameras, by popularity and price.
"Google Shopping will empower businesses of all sizes to compete effectively—and it will help shoppers turn their intentions into actions lightning fast," wrote Sameer Samat, a Google vice president, in a statement."


Submission + - Canadian Copyright board to charge for music at weddings, parades ( 1

silentbrad writes: The CBC reports that the Copyright Board of Canada will begin charging for music played at live venues: 'Money can't buy love — but if you want some great tunes playing at your wedding, it's going to cost you. The Copyright Board of Canada has certified new tariffs that apply to recorded music used at live events including conventions, karaoke bars, ice shows, fairs and, yes, weddings. The fees will be collected by a not-for-profit called Re:Sound. While the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (otherwise known as SOCAN) already collects money from many of these events for the songwriters, Re:Sound will represent the record labels and performers who contributed to the music. ... For weddings, receptions, conventions, assemblies and fashion shows, the fee is $9.25 per day if fewer than 100 people are present and goes up to $39.33 for crowds of more than 500 people. If there's dancing, the fees double. Karaoke bars will pay between $86.06 and $124 annually depending on how many days per week they permit the amateur crooning. And parades, meanwhile, will be charged $4.39 for each float with recorded music participating in the parade, subject to a minimum fee of $32.55 per day.'

Also reported by Sun News, Metro News, and others.

There is very little future in being right when your boss is wrong.