Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission + - Hacking Group Linked to Chinese Army Caught Attacking Dummy Water Plant (technologyreview.com) 4

holy_calamity writes: MIT Technology Review reports that APT1, the China-based hacking group said to steal data from U.S. companies, has been caught taking over a decoy water plant control system. The honeypot mimicked the remote access control panels and physical control system of a U.S. municipal water plant. The decoy was one of 12 set up in 8 countries around the world, which together attracted more than 70 attacks, 10 of which completely compromised the control system. China and Russia were the leading sources of the attacks. The researcher behind the study says his results provide the first clear evidence that people actively seek to exploit the many security problems of industrial systems.

Submission + - Could burnt sugar reduce muscular dystrophy wasting? (washington.edu) 1

vinces99 writes: A trace substance in caramelized sugar, when purified and given in appropriate doses, improves muscle regeneration in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, according to new research. The University of Washington scientists behind the research said that the mice in their study, like boys with the gender-linked inherited disorder, are missing the gene that produces dystrophin, a muscle-repair protein. Neither the mice nor the affected boys can replace enough of their routinely lost muscle cells. In people, muscle weakness begins when the boys are toddlers and progresses until, as teens, they can no longer walk unaided. During early adulthood, their heart and respiratory muscles weaken. Even with ventilators to assist breathing, death usually ensues before age 30. No cure or satisfactory treatment is available. Prednisone drugs relieve some symptoms, but at the cost of severe side effects.

Submission + - Windows Phone 8 could out-earn Android, if Microsoft would let it (networkworld.com)

colinneagle writes: Google doesn't break out the profit and loss of products in its annual reports, but the best picture we have comes from the lawsuit between Google and Oracle. During trial, the judge revealed that Android generated roughly $97.7 million in revenue during the first quarter of 2010, well below Oracle's estimate. Granted, $400 million a year is nothing to sneeze at, but for a company the size of Google, it is chump change.

And then there's Windows Phone 8. Now, Motley Fool estimates Nokia pays Microsoft about $35 per device, while other analysts have guestimated the licensing fee for Windows Phone 8 to be around $30 to $35 per device. Microsoft has never officially confirmed it. With 7.4 million Lumias sold in the most recent quarter, that's an estimated $259 million for Microsoft. I can't rightfully compare it to the $97.7 million estimate from the Android trial since that is based on a 2010 number, but I can compare Android's position in the market in 2010 to Windows Phone's in the most recent quarter. In the first quarter of 2010, Android was breezing past Apple to account for 28% of the market, assuming the No. 2 spot in the market behind Research In Motion, the NPD Group estimated at the time. Meanwhile, Windows Phone 8 reached an all-time high in market share in the most recent quarter — a whopping 4%, according to Strategy Analytics.

By these estimates, we can say Microsoft earns more revenue from a platform that accounts for 4% of the market than Google did when Android stood at 28%.

So while it's far from a slam dunk, it looks like Windows Phone brings in more money for Microsoft than Android, the vastly more popular OS, has for Google in the past. Admittedly, these aren't perfect numbers, but the bigger picture here is that the Windows Phone 8 strategy stands to earn Microsoft a whole lot of money if it can get some momentum.

Submission + - Android Tablets Outsell iPad For First Time (ibtimes.com)

coolnumbr12 writes: In the second quarter, more Android tablets shipped worldwide than Apple iPads for the first time. While Apple still sold the most tablets, its domination of the tablet market slipped from 71.2 percent a year ago to 42.7 percent. Apple sold a total of 14.6 million iPad units in Q2 2013. Coming in second was Samsung with 7.3 million tablets, and increase of 294.8 percent from the year-ago quarter. The rest — Amazon, Lenovo and Acer — also each saw drastic increases in sales.

Submission + - UK Privacy Mess: BT, Vodafone, Verizon & 4 Others Pipe All Customer Data To (theguardian.com)

dryriver writes: Some of the world's leading telecoms firms, including BT and Vodafone, are secretly collaborating with Britain's spy agency GCHQ, and are passing on details of their customers' phone calls, email messages and Facebook entries, documents leaked by the whistleblower Edward Snowden show. BT, Vodafone Cable, and the American firm Verizon Business – together with four other smaller providers – have given GCHQ secret unlimited access to their network of undersea cables. The cables carry much of the world's phone calls and internet traffic. On Friday Germany's Süddeutsche newspaper published the most highly sensitive aspect of this operation – the names of the commercial companies working secretly with GCHQ, and giving the agency access to their customers' private communications. The document identified for the first time which telecoms companies are working with GCHQ's "special source" team. It gives top secret codenames for each firm, with BT ("Remedy"), Verizon Business ("Dacron"), and Vodafone Cable ("Gerontic"). The other firms include Global Crossing ("Pinnage"), Level 3 ("Little"), Viatel ("Vitreous") and Interoute ("Streetcar"). The companies refused to comment on any specifics relating to Tempora, but several noted they were obliged to comply with UK and EU law. The revelations are likely to dismay GCHQ and Downing Street, who are fearful that BT and the other firms will suffer a backlash from customers furious that their private data and intimate emails have been secretly passed to a government spy agency.

Submission + - Why Developers Are Kings: The Rising Power of Devs (adtmag.com)

msmoriarty writes: Google's Don Dodge, GitHub's Tom Preston-Werner, New Relic'sLew Cirne and others recently got together in San Francisco on a panel called "The Developer is King: The Power Behind the Throne." According to coverage of the event, the panelists all agreed that programmers — both independent ones and those employed by companies — have more power, and thus opportunities, than ever. Even the marketing power of developers was acknowledged:
"The only way to convince a developer is by giving them a demo and showing them how its better," said Preston-Werner. "The beauty is, you plant these seeds around the world, and those people will evangelize it for you. Because another thing that developers are great at is telling other developers what works for them."

Submission + - Liquid Drops Reveal Link to Quantum Physics (insidescience.org)

cgscience writes: After a droplet falls onto a vat of vibrating liquid, what it does next could help solve fundamental mysteries in quantum physics. Now, scientists have mapped out the behavior of such drops to more detail than ever before, discovering new ways in which they can move.

If a vat of fluid throbs with too little force, the droplet falling onto it will merely disappear into the liquid. With just the right amount of force, however, the drop will bounce in place or even walk across the surface of the fluid. It can also behave even more unusually

Networking

Submission + - Seattle to get gigabit fiber to the home and business (seattle.gov)

symbolset writes: Enthusiasm about Google's Kansas City fiber project is overwhelming. But in the Emerald City, the government doesn't want to wait. They have been stringing fiber throughout the city for years, and today announced a deal with company Gigabit Squared and the University of Washington to serve fiber to 55,000 Seattle homes and businesses with speeds up to a gigabit. The city will lease out the unused fiber, but will not have ownership in the provider nor a relationship with the end customers. The service rollout is planned to complete in 2014. It is the first of 6 planned university area network projects currently planned by Gigabit Squared.

Is this the way for all of us to get our fiber faster? Have the city run the fiber and lease it out?

Submission + - Canadian Invisibility Cloak Gets Pentagon Backing (huffingtonpost.ca)

Press2ToContinue writes: We've seen many variations of invisibility cloaks recently, visible light and otherwise. However, this one is most like the Harry-Potter version, and is of enough interest to the Pentagon to receive their funding.

"Maple Ridge, B.C.-based Hyperstealth Biotechnology has developed "Quantum Stealth," a type of camouflage that bends light around the wearer or an object to create the illusion of invisibility.

President and CEO Guy Cramer likened the new technology to Harry Potter's invisibility cloak during a recent CNN appearance, and described its ability to easily and effectively hide a soldier in different environments."


Hokey slideshow here (the pictures are reported to be non-photoshopped): http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/12/11/quantum-stealth-invisibility-hyperstealth_n_2277394.html#slide=1868711

Obligatory cliche CNN coverage here: http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2012/12/04/tsr-lawrence-invisble-camo-technology.cnn

Japan

Submission + - Japan police offers first-ever reward for wanted hacker (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: Japanese police are looking for an individual who can code in C#, uses a "Syberian Post Office" to make anonymous posts online, and knows how to surf the web without leaving any digital tracks — and they're willing to pay. It is the first time that Japan's National Police Agency has offered a monetary reward for a wanted hacker, or put so much technical detail into one of its wanted postings. The NPA will pay up to $36,000, the maximum allowed under its reward system. The case is an embarrassing one for the police, in which earlier this year 4 individuals were wrongly arrested after their PCs were hacked and used to post messages on public bulletin boards. The messages included warnings of plans for mass killings at an elementary school posted to a city website.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Investigating IE Mouse Tracking Flaw, Says Users Not Affected Yet

An anonymous reader writes: News broke on Wednesday of a new Internet Explorer vulnerability that allows an attacker to track your mouse cursor anywhere on the screen, even if the browser isn’t being actively used. On Thursday, Microsoft confirmed it is looking into the issue and denied reports that the flaw is already being exploited. “We are currently investigating this issue, but to date there are no reports of active exploits or customers that have been adversely affected,” a Microsoft spokesperson told TNW. “We will provide additional information as it becomes available and will take the appropriate action to protect our customers.”
Iphone

Submission + - Apple iPhone Infringes On Sony, Nokia Patents (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: A federal jury in Delaware has found Apple's iPhone infringes on three patents held by MobileMedia, a patent-holding company formed by Sony, Nokia and MPEG LA, InfoWorld reports. The jury found that the iPhone directly infringed U.S. patent 6,070,068, which was issued to Sony and covers a method for controlling the connecting state of a call, U.S. patent 6,253,075, which covers call rejection, and U.S. patent 6,427,078, which covers a data processing device. MobileMedia has garnered the unflattering descriptor "patent troll" from some observers. The company, which was formed in 2010, holds some 300 patents in all.
The Military

Submission + - Iron Dome: Behind the hoopla, a familiar story of missile-defense hype (thebulletin.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Many journalists believed the hype because they saw fireballs in the sky. The 2nd to the last paragraph of this article explains why the fireballs don't necessarily mean success: "In a recent conversation, MIT professor and missile defense expert Ted Postol suggested one approach for such investigation: the examination of video footage of Iron Dome intercepts. The Iron Dome's interceptor employs a blast fragmentation warhead. During an intercept attempt, the shrapnel from the explosion of the interceptor is supposed to hit the threat rocket and blow up its warhead. Each of these explosions creates a spherical fireball that is visible in a video shot. The fireballs could be seen as elongated, rather than spherical or in some cases as two distinct spheres; they could also overlap, distorting their spherical shapes. But, Postol says, if the video showed a single fireball sphere, it would most likely be an indication of a failed intercept." Jury seems to be still out on this.
Google

Submission + - Google Loses Santa to Bing (technet.com)

Sebolains writes: Unlike previous years, NORAD (the North American Aerospace Defense Command) has decided to use Bing maps to track Santa's journey as he goes around the world delivering presents. Starting Christmas eve, one will be able to go to the official NORAD Santa tracking site (http://www.noradsanta.org/) and use Bing maps to see where Santa is delivering presents at that time. In previous years, NORAD has always gone for Google maps to track Saint Nick. The reason for this switch were not disclosed, but since nearly 25 million people are expected to use this tool come this Christmas, this will definitely benefit Bing in the ongoing competition for online map applications.

Slashdot Top Deals

The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

Working...