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Comment: Re:Hospitals require testing (Score 1) 626

by bkr1_2k (#48887175) Attached to: Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

So pretty much every retail job in the country should be required to be vaccinated?

Ideally yes though I realize that is probably unrealistic.

I'm just trying to clarify what level of "general public" interaction requires this vaccination oversight? Who's going to pay for it? The government or the employer?

Most people are vaccinated already when they are children so the vast majority of the cost is already accounted for. The rest of it is probably pretty much the easiest cost/benefit analysis ever. The cost of the vaccines and program administration would almost certainly be hugely outweighed by the reduced health care costs. I imagine it would be pretty straightforward to do this either with public or private money. Most medical insurance already covers getting vaccines. (vaccines are generally very cheap)

If people shouldn't be forced then how do they work, given that 44% of the jobs in the US are in some form of retail, transportation, education, or healthcare and another ~10-15% are "professional and business services" or "government" that include some sort of regular customer interaction, how are they to have jobs and also choose not to be vaccinated?

Since the point is that they should be vaccinated the answer to your question seems self evident. Furthermore those numbers do not add up to 100% and the percent of loonies who don't get vaccinated is in the single digits.

No they don't add up to 100% but it's a huge portion of the working populace and you can't have it both ways. You can't say you want to give people choice and then limit ~60% of the job market from them.

Regarding cost, I was talking about the cost of the oversight. Verification that people do, in fact, have the appropriate vaccinations etc. You can't ensure this without some significant cost associated with the tracking and oversight.

Comment: Re:Hospitals require testing (Score 1) 626

by bkr1_2k (#48886405) Attached to: Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

So pretty much every retail job in the country should be required to be vaccinated? I'm just trying to clarify what level of "general public" interaction requires this vaccination oversight? Who's going to pay for it? The government or the employer?

If people shouldn't be forced then how do they work, given that 44% of the jobs in the US are in some form of retail, transportation, education, or healthcare and another ~10-15% are "professional and business services" or "government" that include some sort of regular customer interaction, how are they to have jobs and also choose not to be vaccinated?

Comment: Re:Yes. (Score 1) 626

by bkr1_2k (#48886257) Attached to: Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

Hiring people actively engaged in breaking federal and state law and putting themselves in a position of incapacitation as a result? I draw the line there. I don't like drug tests but the reality is I dislike hiring people who could potentially screw up my company by 1) bringing illegal substances to my office 2) potentially getting arrested before a big meeting they are crucial to 3) whatever else you might be able to come up with that increases the risk of hiring the drug using person over a non drug user.

That said, I won't provide employers with financial data, nor will I provide anyone that asks information about my personal life outside of work, be it facebook information, linkedin, my hobbies or anything else.

Comment: Re:From the outside... (Score 1) 661

by visualight (#48874645) Attached to: US Senate Set To Vote On Whether Climate Change Is a Hoax

Currently, accepting GMO means becoming a vassal of Monsanto Corporation. Why would any sane populace _choose_ to be dependent on an ethically challenged mega-corp for their food supply? This isn't about fear, *no one* in a decision making position is *afraid* of GMO. They're just smart enough to keep it the fuck out of their country.
Next time you decide to throw in a bonus (inseparable from Monsanto) GMO plug while posting, please refrain from the standard "fear" debate Monsanto shills always use --and kindly explain why any farmer would choose to depend on Monsanto for his livelihood *forever*. In the U.S. there is no "choice", they'll get you eventually.
Thing is, YOU are well aware of all of this, and yet here you are advocating for GMO. You're a bad person.

Comment: Re:Not "like Slashdot" (Score 1) 224

by bkr1_2k (#48867601) Attached to: Facebook Will Let You Flag Content As 'False'

Your definition of "beyond reasonable doubt" and mine are different. the few times I've moderated something overrated it has ALWAYS been because it was at least a majority, if not entirely, incorrect. I agree, there are very few reasons to mod down but incorrect information is definitely one of them.

Comment: Re:how is this any different?? (Score 1) 872

by bkr1_2k (#48822917) Attached to: Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

No one has said it was acceptable. What I said (and what I believe the Pope meant) is that it's not a surprise that when you go out of your way to offend someone, they react badly.

There are any number of instances where you could say so & so should be "turned into a glass crater" because of some real or imagined slight or offense. Obviously no one is condoning the out-of-proportion response to the Charlie Ebdo but let's not act like this is some sort of shock either. It's happened before and the editors of Charlie Ebdo chose to continue the action. I'm not saying I disagree with their choice (I think we should be able to say & print whatever we think as long as it doesn't put people in physical harm - like yelling fire in a crowded theater as the classic example) but let's not try to imply they had no part of this and the action was completely unexpected.

The only real question is whether or not it is reasonable to think that their actions did directly put people in harm. I think not, but clearly someone disagrees with me.

Comment: Re:how is this any different?? (Score 4, Insightful) 872

by bkr1_2k (#48819257) Attached to: Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

What he said was violence is bad and you shouldn't commit violence. But if you deliberately offend someone, you should expect some level of violent response. He implied this is because humans haven't learned very well how not to respond with violence.

Just because violence is bad doesn't mean you should go through life somehow expecting to avoid it and acting insulted when it happens after you've been a douchebag.

Comment: Re:Yet another buzzword! (Score 1) 272

by bkr1_2k (#48805323) Attached to: Silicon Valley's Quest To Extend Life 'Well Beyond 120'

Please read the rest of Genesis. Abraham lived to be 175 supposedly. This came after Genesis 6:3. Hell, Isaac (son of Abraham) was born when Abraham was 100 years old and Sarah (Isaac's mother) was 90 years old (Genesis 17:17). Terah (Abraham's father) was 205 years old (Genesis 11:27–32).

That reference is inconsistent, to say the least.

Comment: Re:Countless Comments on Prior Articles & Now (Score 4, Informative) 219

by visualight (#48764313) Attached to: FBI: North Korean Hackers "Got Sloppy", Leaked IP Addresses

"Everybody else pretty much agrees North Korea did it... "

Wait, what? I was under the impression that -no one- thinks North Korea did it. I certainly don't, and that's in part because my government is so -focused- on getting us to believe they did.

And in part because the president is a democrat (pwned by Hollywood).
And in part because of what was hacked, what was released.

(another) data breach is embarrassing. An attack by NK garners sympathy. Also, without this hack The Interview would have made about a dollar.

No idea why 'North Korea did it' can possible be modded "Informative".

Comment: Re:Balloons (Score 1) 174

by visualight (#48726131) Attached to: How Galaxies Are Disappearing From Our Universe

Gravity slows down the expansion, and, it slows down the passage of time. Time and space are not merely relative they are one and the same. The expansion of space and the passage of time -are the same thing- .

Perhaps at some point space-time expands so fast that it actually rips and a huge expanse of the universe is flooded with quantum energy made matter. Uniformly, throughout the expanse. This matter then slows down the expansion -temporarily though, as matter collects together due to gravity and creates new "pockets" where the speed of expansion can pick up again.

Comment: Re:Pullin' a Gates? (Score 1) 449

by visualight (#48715923) Attached to: How We'll Program 1000 Cores - and Get Linus Ranting, Again

Instead of paraphrasing why not just quote him directly? It's not a long article and no one will think 'strawman'.

"Big caches are efficient. Parallel stupid small cores without caches are horrible unless you have a very specific load that is hugely regular (ie graphics)." ...
"the crazies talking about scaling to hundreds of cores are just that - crazy."

In that context, he's right. If you're doing hundreds of dumb cores you should be using gpu already.

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