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Comment: Re:Here's what I think about the BB (Score 1) 189

by dnoyeb (#31284302) Attached to: BlackBerry Bold Tops Radiation Ranking

I got a Nexus One. Glad to get off the BB. I didn't have battery problems, but their bluetooth is terrible. Especially when paired with a plantronics headset. I have 3 headsets. Bought about 1 per year and finally just gave up and went wired. Which I like for the lower radiation anyway. I do wired everything, even home network. The only wireless I give up and completely accept is a cordless phone. (I know wifi and bluetooth are basically the same here)

My black berry lived at least a month after going through the washing machine so I respect them for that.

I agree that if the signal is lost the BB will search your battery away.

Comment: Re:Diploma mills prove the worthlessness of degree (Score 1) 258

by dnoyeb (#30981256) Attached to: Key EDS Witness Bought Internet Degree

I agree somewhat. I think it depends largely on the College you attent. If its a big name place, then they are primarily concerned with keeping their big name and their big donations. Other schools are too stupid to know how the game is played. Those schools actually teach you useful information like the one I attended.

On another note, I am an EE but I write software. I studied software on my own because its my first love. I don't think an EE has any advantage over a software degree.

Software is not as simple as making the hardware go. To many EEs think this way and I spend lots of time fighting with them trying to make sure they understand what 'good' software is. Management too. If it goes to the lab and works, they want to ship it.

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Seinfeld's Good Samaritan Law Now Reality? 735

Posted by samzenpus
from the not-that-there-is-anything-wrong-with-that dept.
e3m4n writes "The fictitious 'good samaritan' law from the final episode of Seinfeld (the one that landed them in jail for a year) appears to be headed toward reality for California residents after the house passed this bill. There are some differences, such as direct action is not required, but the concept of guilt by association for not doing the right thing is still on the face of the bill."

Comment: Re:difficult? (Score 1) 177

by dnoyeb (#30835062) Attached to: Kernel Contributor Corbet Says Linux Community Is 'Intimidating'

I agree. You cant just jump in and write code until you prove that you know what your doing. And you may offer several patched that get rejected because the form of the change is incorrect. If your competent and really want to make a change you will keep at it and eventually get in.

I can't think of a more perfect system. I have done this on several open source projects. Typically though you are not just looking for work. You are looking to get something fixed that no one else seems to care much about. I don't know how it would work for someone just wanting to write code.

Comment: Re:Hmm, this seems illogical. (Score 1) 492

by dnoyeb (#30762986) Attached to: US DOJ Says Kindle In Classroom Hurts Blind Students

Why not speech-to-text? Blind people could care less about text-to-speech because they don't care about text in the first place. A blind person should have an audio book from the start. If an audio version is not available, the University should pick a different work for their syllabus. Otherwise, be sued under the ADA.

Therefore, while text-to-speech may make copyright-greedy people unhappy, there is nothing wrong with having a text book for most students and an audio book for blind students. Just not both for both.

Comment: Re:I'm not sure about their policy... (Score 1) 308

by dnoyeb (#30685754) Attached to: <em>EVE Online</em> Battle Breaks Records (And Servers)

Not true.

1. 0.0 refers to the security level of the area. It has nothing to do with anything here TBH.

2. There was a large fleet presence in a solar system by an alliance trying to take over that solar system from the other alliance. The solar system is on a certain Node. When the other alliance tried to enter the system to fight the alliance there already, in-game, in the real world this means they are also trying to join the node that the solar system is hosted by.

3. The function is not in-game, and is supposed to be done before the servers get shut down for the day so the node can be moved for the next day. Probably you just send an email. obviously a flawed system.

These fights happen in different solar systems all the time. For instance, if they HAD requested the server move, but the enemy had jumped into them and attacked in the neighboring solar system, the node reinforcement would be meaningless. (unless they happened to host all the local solar systems on the same node)

Comment: Re:Why Am I Not Surprised (Score 1) 308

by dnoyeb (#30656514) Attached to: <em>EVE Online</em> Battle Breaks Records (And Servers)

Correction: Typically several star systems are handled by a single server. Note that "single server" does not mean 1 computer, but could be several working together on that 1 star system.

With this new type of thing, if you let CCP know ahead of time where the fight will be, they will assign that star system to just 1 server. The ability to do this is appearantly new. But theoretically, this only helps if the other star systems had a significant number of pilots in them. Relative to the number of people fighting in large fleet battles, and where these usually take place, the single server to star system is not likely to help much. Unless this is a special jumbo server of some sort.

From what I hear, it may add 5-10% more playability.

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