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Comment: Re:Not for new users of FreeBSD (Score 2) 75 75

Sorry about that mistake. I'm not a FreeBSD expert, I'm someone who is setting up a FreeBSD file server, after 10 years of using Linux. So I'm in the market for a book like this, and of course it is largely useless to me, because of course I'm using ZFS. I was confused by the PC-BSD installer, which *does* default to ZFS.

Comment: Not for new users of FreeBSD (Score 2) 75 75

Now that ZFS is the default operating system for new installs of FreeBSD 10.x, it sounds like this book documents a lot of hard won technical insights that have been made obsolete by ZFS. Why would I configure RAID 10 for UFS when ZFS provides superior data protection? And so on. It's probably useful for people who have parachuted in and now must maintain a legacy FreeBSD system. It doesn't sound particularly useful for someone who is migrating from Linux to FreeBSD right now, since this is all about how people *used* to configure FreeBSD storage.

Comment: fab at home (Score 1) 72 72

The fabathome.org 3D printer is open source, has been available for years, and can print a wide range of materials, including conductors. It's never really taken off, probably due to having lower resolution than the popular FDM printers that print with melted plastic. But if you want a home printer that can print objects with a range of materials, including conductors, check it out.

Comment: not a "mobile" technology (Score 4, Interesting) 156 156

As I understand it, this is a replacement for running a fibre optic link between your house and your ISP. Instead, you mount an antenna on your roof, which engages in narrow beam, line of sight 60 GHz communication with your ISP. I think the benefits are that it is potentially cheaper than running a fibre optic cable to your house. The signal is attenuated by rain, and by atmospheric oxygen. I doubt the signal can travel very well through walls. And I don't think it is useful for mobile devices.

Doug Moen

Security

Intel Cache Poisoning Is Dangerously Easy On Linux 393 393

Julie188 writes "A researcher recently released proof-of-concept code for an exploit that allows a hacker to overrun an Intel CPU cache and plant a rootkit. A second, independent researcher has examined the exploit and noted that it is so simple and so stealthy that it is likely out in the wild now, unbeknownst to its victims. The attack works best on a Linux system with an Intel DQ35 motherboard with 2GB of memory. It turns out that Linux allows the root user to access MTR registers incredibly easily. With Windows this exploit can be used, but requires much more work and skill and so while the Linux exploit code is readily available now, no Windows exploit code has, so far, been released or seen. This attack is hardware specific, but unfortunately, it is specific to Intel's popular DQ35 motherboards."
Music

The Deceptive Perfection of Auto-Tune 437 437

theodp writes "For a medium in which mediocre singing has never been a bar to entry, a lot of pop vocals suddenly sound better than great — they're note- and pitch-perfect. It's all thanks to Auto-Tune, the brainchild of Andy Hildebrand, who realized that the wonders of autocorrelation — which he once used to map drilling sites for the oil industry — could also be used to bestow perfect pitch upon the Britney Spears of the world. While Auto-Tune was intended to be used unnoticed, musicians are growing fond of adjusting the program's retune speed to eliminate the natural transition between notes, which yield jumpy and automated-sounding vocals. 'I never figured anyone in their right mind would want to do that,' says Hildebrand." As these techniques improve and become more popular, it makes me wonder what music produced twenty or fifty years from now will sound like, and how much authenticity will be left.
Data Storage

New Memristor Makes Low-Cost, High-Density Memory 86 86

KentuckyFC writes "A group of electronics engineers have discovered that a thin layer of vanadium oxide acts as a memristor, the fourth basic component of circuits after resistors, capacitors, and inductors that was discovered last year. At a critical temperature, a current passing through the layer causes it to change from an insulating state to a metal-like state, thereby changing its resistance (abstract). The effect lasts many hours — which is what makes the layer a memristor (a resistor with memory). The team says this could be scaled up to make resistive random access memory, or RRAM, at very low cost, from little more than layers of vanadium oxide."
Unix

+ - ZFS committed to FreeBSD CVS

An anonymous reader writes: Pawel Jakub Dawidek has announced on the freebsd-current mailing list that he has committed Sun's ZFS file system to FreeBSD 7-CURRENT. This full support for its logical volume management via storage pools, self-healing and data corruption detection, NFS export, and more. Arguably the most exciting new file system on the planet will be available out of the box in FreeBSD 7.0 later this year!
User Journal

Journal: I love Ubuntu Linux

I just tried upgrading to Ubuntu Linux 7.4 Fiesty Fawn beta 1 last night. I started the update-manager -c to chose to upgrade online. I had one little problem ....

Anne turned off the lightswitch where teh laptop was plugged in during the upgrade. :-( So my laptop is half 6.10 and half 7.4.

May Euell Gibbons eat your only copy of the manual!

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