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Comment: Re:Missed the point (Score 1) 594

by alangmead (#36970690) Attached to: The Most Expensive One-Byte Mistake
Saying "PDP" instruction set makes them sound all the same. C is very similar to the PDP-11 instruction set, Unfortunately, it was produced after C was developed. I strain to find similarities between the PDP-7 instruction set and C. Most of the PDP-11-isms that people see in C are the post-(increment|decrement) instruction variations and the MOV variations that dereference an address register.
Space

A Map of the Universe, 10 Years In the Making 130

Posted by timothy
from the so-it's-gotta-be-good dept.
gabbo529 writes "Astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have created a map of the universe called the 2MASS Redshift Survey. The astronomers put in 10 laborious years in creating the map and it is what they call the most complete 3-D map of the local universe (out to a distance of 380 million light-years) ever created. 2MASS Redshift Survey extends closer to the Galactic plane than any other map of the universe before it; the region is generally obscured by dust."
Security

Are You Sure SHA-1+Salt Is Enough For Passwords? 409

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the good-enough-for-govt-work dept.
Melchett writes "It's all too common that Web (and other) applications use MD5, SHA1, or SHA-256 to hash user passwords, and more enlightened developers even salt the password. And over the years I've seen heated discussions on just how salt values should be generated and on how long they should be. Unfortunately in most cases people overlook the fact that MD and SHA hash families are designed for computational speed, and the quality of your salt values doesn't really matter when an attacker has gained full control, as happened with rootkit.com. When an attacker has root access, they will get your passwords, salt, and the code that you use to verify the passwords."

+ - RIAA's Tenenbaum verdict cut from $675k to $67.5k-> 1

Submitted by NewYorkCountryLawyer
NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) writes "In SONY BMG Music Entertainment v. Tenenbaum, the Court has reduced the jury's award from $675,000, or $22,500 per infringed work, to $67,500, or $2,250 per infringed work, on due process grounds, holding that the jury's award was unconstitutionally excessive. In a 64-page decision (PDF), District Judge Nancy Gertner ruled that the Gore, Campbell, and Williams line of cases was applicable to determining the constitutionality of statutory damages awards, that statutory damages must bear a reasonable relationship to the actual damages, and that the usual statutory damages award in even more egregious commercial cases is from 2 to 6 times the actual damages. However, after concluding that the actual damages in this case were ~ $1 per infringed work, she entered a judgment for 2250 times that amount. Go figure."
Link to Original Source
Software

How Wolfram Alpha's Copyright Claims Could Change Software 258

Posted by timothy
from the my-patent-app-will-involve-prayer-wheels-and-combinatorics dept.
snydeq writes "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister suggests that Wolfram Research's claim to copyright of results returned by the Wolfram Alpha engine could have significant ramifications for the software industry. 'While software companies routinely retain sole ownership of their software and license it to users, Wolfram Research has taken the additional step of claiming ownership of the output of the software itself,' McAllister writes, pointing out that it is 'at least theoretically possible to copyright works generated by machines.' And, under current copyright law, if any Wolfram claim to authorship of the output of its engine is upheld, by extension the same rules will apply to other information services in similar cases as well. In other words, 'If unique presentations based on software-based manipulation of mundane data are copyrightable, who retains what rights to the resulting works?'"

Comment: Re:Sometimes Apple still thinks too much like a... (Score 1) 841

I am sorry but you are wrong. The iTunes music store launched in 2003. At the time the iPod was firewire and Mac only. It wasn't until after the music store launched and the 3rd gen of iPod was launched that also supported windows that iPods became "wildly popular."

God made machine language; all the rest is the work of man.

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