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Comment: No. (Score 1) 239

by cadeon (#49025453) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Will It Take To End Mass Surveillance?

Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered with "No."

Mass surveillance won't end. We have a new era of existence now, and that era includes easy access to anything you've ever communicated.

The thing we'll need to keep in check is how the information collected is used, which is part of the reason why personal right and acceptance of others is so important.

Comment: "Open source made easy" (Score 1) 598

by cadeon (#48743391) Attached to: Tumblr Co-Founder: Apple's Software Is In a Nosedive

The back of the 10.4 server box said "Open source made easy" - and that's what it was, a lot of open technologies pulled together and given focus by Apple. Samba, bind, Apache, MySQL, openldap, etc all controlled with a pretty decent gui. Even the Mach kernal had an open version you could download and use with a bad-like user land (darwin).

Then in 10.5 they started removing the open parts and closing it all up. 10.4 could be a windows domain controller thanks to leveraging samba- today's OS X server can't, because Apple decided to replace samba with a closed implementation.

Not only has Apple made more work for themselves, they are actively pushing away the users that help grow the platform. Sure, the grandparents don't care if there's a decent xserver included- but the young person who helps keep their computers working (and tells them what to buy) does.

I embraced OS X when 10.4 for intel came out, because I could run anything. I could compile my Unix tools and use them on a nice, more focused platform. Now that's much more difficult, and instead of looking forward to what's next from Apple, I'm wondering how much longer I can stand to stay in the ecosystem.

+ - Why Standard Deviation Should Be Retired From Scientific Use-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Statistician and author Nassim Taleb has a suggestion for scientific researchers: stop trying to use standard deviations in your work. He says it's misunderstood more often than not and also not the best tool for its purpose. 'It is all due to a historical accident: in 1893, the great Karl Pearson introduced the term "standard deviation" for what had been known as "root mean square error." The confusion started then: people thought it meant mean deviation. The idea stuck: every time a newspaper has attempted to clarify the concept of market "volatility", it defined it verbally as mean deviation yet produced the numerical measure of the (higher) standard deviation. But it is not just journalists who fall for the mistake: I recall seeing official documents from the department of commerce and the Federal Reserve partaking of the conflation, even regulators in statements on market volatility. What is worse, Goldstein and I found that a high number of data scientists (many with PhDs) also get confused in real life.'
Link to Original Source

+ - To OLPC or not to OLPC->

Submitted by koubalitis
koubalitis writes: A friend of mine, an elementary school principaly in Greece, has asked me to help him evaluate the following situation, An ex student of the elementary school, now in his 70', wants to make a donation in the form of computer laptops. He is willing to buy a laptop for every student in the school, arround 150. He suggested getting OLPCs which cost arround 250-280euros per piece (including shipping and import taxes) but he is open to other alternatives. The principal gave me a sample OLPC XO-4 unit for evaluation. The truth is i wasn't impressed. It doesn't have support for Greek (UI or keyboard layout), the screen is too small, it feels too slow and the whole environment is too restrictive. On the other hand i liked the ruggedized plastics and the battery life. 300euros can get you a descent 11'' dual core netbook with linux preinstalled . So the question is this. Should we go for the OLPC or an alternative netbook/laptop/tablet? Does any slashdoter have experience with OLPCs?
Link to Original Source

+ - "Permissionless Innovation" or Why You Have No Privacy->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: Why do apps take our information and sell it without our permission? Why is the Internet of Things a tangle of insecure devices? It all boils down to a theory — "permissionless innovation" whereby businesses and other innovators act first and apologize later. This piece explores what it is and whether, in the context of the Internet of Things, it's a danger.
Link to Original Source

+ - Why Birds Fly in a V Formation-> 2

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit writes: Anyone watching the autumn sky knows that migrating birds fly in a V formation, but scientists have long debated why. A new study of ibises--where researchers took to microlight planes and recorded birds strapped with GPS in-flight--finds that these big-winged birds carefully position their wingtips and sync their flapping, presumably to catch the preceding bird’s updraft and save energy during flight.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Fucking rednecks (Score 3, Informative) 1030

by dlapine (#45495149) Attached to: A War Over Solar Power Is Raging Within the GOP

The thing is, I can put solar on my house, and I will be to able to generate enough power, on occasion, to have some extra to put back on the grid. With the right configuration and local storage, I can even go off the grid. As a consumer, the other options you mention are things I can't do. Sure, solar is more expensive per KWH, but at least it's doable for lots of homeowners.

Separately, you may not have noticed that the Republicans have held effective veto power over new legislation in the Senate until just yesterday. Thus, making the claim the Republicans (even with a minority in the Senate) can be held somewhat responsible for lack of progress in the area seems reasonable.

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