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Submission + - Computer trading and dark pools (cnn.com)

Bob the Super Hamste writes: CNN Money has an article on computerized trading specifically the non-public markets that are often used to execute orders. The company that the article discusses executes 1/8 of all stock trades in the US or about 900 million trades a day, for comparison the NYSE executes about 700 million trades. The article discusses dark pools or private markets where quotes aren't disclosed to the broader public markets. If the company is unable to fill an order from within its own dark pool it will submit the order to the broader public market, 13 public exchanges, as well as up to 20 other private dark pools. The quotes offered by the private dark pools by law have to be the same or better quote than those offered on public exchanges. There have been recent questions about whether the quotes provided by dark pools have been the best for customers and there is a current investigation by FINRA into the methods used by market makers and dark pool operators to fill orders.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - 9th Circuit Appeals Court: 4th Amendment Applies At The Border (techdirt.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Techdirt reports:

"Here's a surprise ruling. For many years we've written about how troubling it is that Homeland Security agents are able to search the contents of electronic devices, such as computers and phones at the border, without any reason. The 4th Amendment only allows reasonable searches, usually with a warrant. But the general argument has long been that, when you're at the border, you're not in the country and the 4th Amendment doesn't apply. This rule has been stretched at times, including the ability to take your computer and devices into the country and search it there, while still considering it a "border search," for which the lower standards apply. Just about a month ago, we noted that Homeland Security saw no reason to change this policy.

Well, now they might have to. "


Submission + - Trojan Takes Extended 'Naps' To Avoid Detection (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: "Even the bleakest circumstances look a bit brighter after a good nap — a fact that isn’t lost on malware authors, according to researchers at the firm FireEye, which have identified a new Trojan Horse program that uses extended sleep cycles to fool behavior based malware detection technology.

In a blog post Tuesday, researchers Abhishek Singh and Ali Islam said the new malware, dubbed Trojan Nap, has a function, dubbed SleepEx() that can be used to configure long “naps” that the malware takes after it is installed on a compromised system. The default value, 600,000 milliseconds – or 10 minutes – seems designed to fool automated analysis systems that are programmed to capture a sample of behavior for a set time frame. “By executing a sleep call with a long timeout, Nap can prevent an automated analysis system from capturing its malicious behavior,” FireEye said."


Submission + - HR Departments Tell Equifax Your Entire Salary History (nbcnews.com)

chiguy writes: From NBC News:
"The Equifax credit reporting agency, with the aid of thousands of human resource departments around the country, has assembled...[a database]...containing 190 million employment and salary records covering more than one-third of U.S. adults...[Equifax] says [it] is adding 12 million records annually."

This salary information is for sale: "Its database is so detailed that it contains week-by-week paystub information dating back years for many individuals, as well as ... health care provider, whether someone has dental insurance and if they’ve ever filed an unemployment claim."


Submission + - Oracle Responds to Java Security Critics with Massive 50 Flaw Patch Update (esecurityplanet.com)

darthcamaro writes: Oracle has been slammed a lot in recent months about it's lackluster handling of Java security. Now Oracle is responding as strongly as it can with one of the largest Java security updates in history. 50 flaws in total with the vast majority carrying the highest-possible CVSS score of 10.
Will this finally be the patch that makes Java secure?

Submission + - SPAM: Samsung UEFI bug fixed ..

An anonymous reader writes: Samsung laptops will no longer be irreparably destroyed when their users try to boot Linux on them, kernel chieftain Linus Torvalds made certain today.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Apple UDIDs Stolen From Digital Publishing Firm (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "The 1 million Apple device UDIDs that were leaked last week were stolen from digital publisher Bluetoad, the company's CEO Paul DeHart in wrote in a blog post Monday. In describing the theft from its servers, BlueToad downplayed the risk to information types other than UDIDs: 'BlueToad does not collect, nor have we ever collected, highly sensitive personal information like credit cards, social security numbers or medical information,' DeHart said."

Submission + - Anonymous Hacks Cambodia Over The Pirate Bay Co-founder's Arrest

An anonymous reader writes: At the start of this month, news broke that The Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm had been arrested in Cambodia, quickly followed by speculation that millions of dollars were exchanged for his capture. Svartholm was deported to Sweden today, and rather coincidentally, the Anonymous hacker collective announced that it had hacked Cambodia’s government sites and leaked over 5,000 documents.

Submission + - M-Carbon: 50yro mystery solved (yale.edu) 1

slew writes: Unlike its more famous carbon cousins: diamonds and fullerenes, you've probably never heard of M-Carbon, but this form of compressed graphite which is as hard as diamonds has baffled researcher for half a century. Over the past few years, many theoretical computations have suggested at least a dozen different crystal structures for this phase of carbon, but new experiments showed that only one crystal structure fits the data: M-carbon.

Submission + - Will Parallel Code Ever Be Embraced? (drdobbs.com)

CowboyRobot writes: "Andrew Binstock at Dr. Dobb's has an essay in which he argues "The advent of the many-core era is not going to push developers to write more parallel code. That hasn't happened as we've gone from 1- to 2- to 4- to 8-core processors, has it? Writing parallel code is not the problem. So, let's stop trying to fix it." He suggests the solution is to "scale out" with more processes instead of scaling up with more threads per process. Does this make sense?"

Submission + - Mass Cyber Espionage Campaign Hits Middle East (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Hundreds of staff at government agencies and industrial companies across the Middle East have had their machines infected with the 'Madi' malware which steals data and takes screenshots, say two security firms, Kaspersky and Seculert. The motives are not clear, and nor is the origin of the attack."

Submission + - New Species of Monkey Flower Shows Speciation in Action (msn.com)

Antipater writes: NBCNews is reporting on a hybrid of two monkey flowers, which has evolved to become fertile. It will breed with other flowers of the new hybrid type, but not other monkey flowers — a clearly distinguished new species, showing speciation on a macroscopic scale. From the article:

"While many new species of plants are thought to arise this way, it has only been witnessed amongst wild plants a handful of times in history, said Vallejo-Marin, a scientist at the University of Stirling. Hybrid flowers typically have an odd number of chromosomes, or enormous packets of DNA, making them unable to reproduce. But this flower somehow duplicated its entire genome. "

Open Source

Submission + - NVIDIA Loses Face and a 10 Million PC Order over Linux Drivers (brightsideofnews.com)

Jkumar_cool writes: A rumor appeared from the heart of Beijing that due to the performance of its GPU architecture and its Linux drivers, NVIDIA was approached by one of the leading Chinese CPU teams to use an NV GPU in a pilot school PC project. The Linux would run on the Chinese CPU, while GeForce GPU would provide the graphics power. 'Pilot project' in this case means over 10 million PCs in one order, broken down — 100,000 schools with 100-150 PCs each. The problem was two-fold; NVIDIA never releases source code for its Linux drivers, and the binaries are only X86. Incentivized by the Chinese government, the Chinese CPU team called NVIDIA to come to China and work with them.

To cut the story short, the NV team appeared there, and in very arrogant manner told the Chinese side that they are a large US corporation, and that recompiling the Linux drivers would cost the Chinese a lot of money. The money that Chinese CPU team and the Academy of Science were supposed to fork out was to the tune of several million dollars in incentive that are typically referred to as NRE — Non-recurring Engineering.

Social Networks

Submission + - Reddit Now Banning Quality News Sites Such as The Atlantic and Business Week

Kindgott writes: "Sites where users can promote stories eventually have to come to terms with the possibility of users gaming the system in order to promote their own sites — whether they generate revenue or contain malicious content.

With that in mind, Reddit implementeda domain blocking system, initially targeting URL shortening services.

Today, Reddit user violentacrez recently posted that "entire high-quality" domains such as The Atlantic and Business Week are subject to a blanket ban.

In light of previous behavior by sites, some users welcome the change, while others are condemn it as censorship.

A subreddit has been created in order to keep track of confirmed blocked domains."

The clothes have no emperor. -- C.A.R. Hoare, commenting on ADA.