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Comment: Re:Only 24 hours? (Score 1) 107

by djheru (#30997830) Attached to: Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS In 24 Hours
I would be more emotional about it if it caused a real life problem for me. In real life, when I make a site, I usually will define about a half dozen or so text styles, 20-30 html element styles, and about the same number of layout styles. The rest I leave up to Blueprint CSS. If I need to change things, I just do a search/replace in eclipse and everything seems to work out ok. Now if you want to see me get pissed off, we can talk about how the browsers implement the standards.

Comment: Re:Only 24 hours? (Score 1) 107

by djheru (#30997060) Attached to: Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS In 24 Hours

Because CSS is not a programming language. If you want, you can easily have the programming language of your choice generate CSS. You can also use multiple classes on any html element. You can use Javascript libraries to avoid those problems as well.

I'm not saying that CSS is perfect, or even great, because it isn't. But it is not intended to be a programming language, and you are basically complaining that it doesn't have the features of a programming language.

Comment: Re:Only 24 hours? (Score 1) 107

by djheru (#30989146) Attached to: Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS In 24 Hours
The reason is that it's better to favor composition over inheritance. In any relatively complex website, the scheme you describe would become unwieldy. It is better to assign general characteristics to outer elements, and then get more specific and you get deeper into the DOM (as a general rule). At least that's how I do it. I am really one of that hated breed, the PHP "developer" (although I do real languages as well), and 90% of what I do uses Zend framework, but I make it a point to have my css cascade intelligently instead of defining a bunch of classes with redundancies. Also, blueprint css helps a lot.

Comment: Re:Only 24 hours? (Score 1) 107

by djheru (#30987612) Attached to: Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS In 24 Hours
That doesn't make any sense. You still have to assign the value to the variable. The value is going to be a hex number. You don't have to use hex colors, if you want to limit yourself to the color names that css recognizes, but the point of creating a class like .redHeader is so you can set the color values once and then forget them, using the people friendly class names instead. You can create as many classes as you want and name them things like .redHeader, .darkRedHeader, .reddishOrangeHeader, etc. In the end, you are communicating with a computer. It's not the fault of css that browsers use hex to render colors. But if it helps, just remember that the first two digits are red, the next two are green, and the last two are blue. So #5444BB is mostly blue with some red and slightly less green mixed in.

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