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Comment: If you are going to drink buy a real breathalyzer (Score 3, Interesting) 420

by djhertz (#48684531) Attached to: Drunk Drivers in California May Get Mandated Interlock Devices

BACtrack S80 Pro Breathalyzer Portable Breath Alcohol Tester. -- $120 on Amazon

It's not going to solve the problem for people with terrible judgement, but it can help. I have one I carry in my laptop bag, which I have to have with me just about at all times for work. If I'm at a party and somebody shouldn't be driving I'll offer it up. And really it's hard for them to say no. Really? No? You're "good"? Come on man, it's fun. And it is fun (in a nerdy way). So far it's saved one friend, you know sort has had a little too much, but boy.. had a lot to eat and it's been hours since his last beer, but it's pretty late, but he did just drink a few coffees. one of those situations where you know he shouldn't drive, and he sort of knows, but his wife is going to kill him if he stays over....

So he blew over and that was it. Right there, over the limit. No question, no "I'm OK, it's not far" or "I'm just tired I'll be fine." Nope, we all just saw that, you are over, nobody is letting you leave. This is the smart thing to do.

Anyways sort of a tangent but this thing is money well spent. Hope it helps somebody else.

+ - 5 year old passed Microsoft Certified Professional

Submitted by EzInKy
EzInKy (115248) writes "The BBC has this heartwarming story about a five year old British boy who is the youngest Microsoft Certified Professional.

He told the BBC he found the exam difficult but enjoyable, and hopes to set up a UK-based tech hub one day.

"There were multiple choice questions, drag and drop questions, hotspot questions and scenario-based questions," he told the BBC Asian Network.

"The hardest challenge was explaining the language of the test to a five-year-old. But he seemed to pick it up and has a very good memory," explained Ayan's father Asim.

Ayan says he hopes to launch a UK-based IT hub similar to America's Silicon Valley one day, which he intends to call E-Valley."

+ - Disney keeps mysterious no-fly zone over parks->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "What do the White House and the Magic Kingdom have in common? Each is protected by a federally imposed no-fly zone.

That's because for the past decade, Disney World and Disneyland have benefited from a deal slipped into a 300-page spending bill that designates airspace above both parks as no-fly zones. That means anyone caught trying to chopper into Cinderella’s castle could risk federal prosecution and jail time.

The no-fly zones were put in place ostensibly for security reasons following 9/11 but have stayed in place in what some say is a cleverly crafted plan by Disney to keep pesky aerial advertisers out of its pristine airspace."

Link to Original Source

+ - Superbugs: 10 Long-Lived Software Bugs->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Earlier this week, Microsoft patched a 19-year-old security vulnerability that has been present in every version of its operating systems since the release of Windows 1995. As the IBM researchers who discovered the bug put it, it’s been 'sitting in plain site' while other vulnerabilities in the same library have been fixed over the years. While it may seem surprising that a critical error in such a major piece of software, used by so many people, could go unnoticed for decades, it’s actually not that uncommon, writes ITworld's Phil Johnson, who rounded up 10 more examples of software bugs that were particularly long-lived — not all of which have yet been fixed."
Link to Original Source

+ - Is non-USB flash direct from China safe?

Submitted by Dishwasha
Dishwasha (125561) writes "I recently purchased a couple 128GB MicroSDXC card from a Chinese supplier via Alibaba at 1/5th the price of what is available in the US. I will be putting one in my phone and another in my laptop. A few days after purchased, it occurred to me there may be a potential risk with non-USB flash devices similar to USB firmware issues.

Does anybody know if there are any known firmware issues with SD or other non-USB flash cards that could effectively allow a foreign seller/distributor to place malicious software on my Android phone or laptop simply on insertion of the device with autoplay turned off?"

Comment: I use Aereo, it's great (Score 4, Interesting) 211

by djhertz (#45922795) Attached to: Supreme Court To Hear Aereo Case

I live within the broadcast range of Boston but due to a hill I'm on (and weather) I only get one or two channels at best. I like to watch American football and having the signal drop in the middle of a play just stinks. Aereo allows me to watch (and pause/record) shows I would normally get fed up with and just not watch. It's a great service to mesh with Netflix/Amazon Streaming/etc. since you get sports and live news. We really like it.

As to why the broadcasters are against Aereo I guess there could be concern about timeshifting, etc. But if I did get solid reception OTA I could just use any DVR to do pause and recording, or even a VCR (ok not a VCR, no TV is worth using one of those again).

Overall I see Aereo, Netflix, etc. as the future. Much like mp3s and digital streaming are the media for music. It would probably be best for the broadcasters to try and figure out how to best make it all work. I still don't understand why a broadcaster would not want Aereo to 'repeat' their signal, w/o it I would not be able to watch the shows, hence not view the commercials.

Comment: Re:Just like the war on drugs, nobody ever learns. (Score 1) 178

by djhertz (#40901803) Attached to: Demonoid Shut By Ukrainian Authorities

As a Libertarian, thank you. I live in NH and get a lot of calls from presidential survey companies, "In the upcoming election will you vote for the Republican X or Democrat Y." And I respond with "Neither, I'll be voting for the Libertarian candidate Z" They don't seem to ever like that since the little boxes they use don't have that option. I'll be told, "Sir, that isn't an option" and then I get on my soapbox....

Part of why I became a Libertarian was to have an impact. The phrase "The only wasted vote, is the one that goes to a Democrat or a Republican." really hits home and I'm going to start using that a lot. I have a friend with her PHD in Political Science. I thought voting for anything but X or Y was a waste but she pointed out that anybody who usually votes one way or the other is already a notched vote, it isn't going to change. The 2 big parties need me, so what can they do to get my vote? So by voting and being vocal about how I feel I can get the attention of X and Y and maybe they will change a bit towards my direction. So by acting how I do, I impact both sides. If I am a solid X or a solid Y I'm just in the pile to be counted, not to be courted.

Comment: Re:Rise of the discount carriers (Score 1) 331

by djhertz (#40023555) Attached to: Verizon To Kill All Unlimited Data Plans

My wife is on Virgin Mobile (which is the Sprint network) $25/month, unlimited text, data, and 300 minutes. Coverage is actually pretty good. It's also pay as you go and you just buy your phone up front (I think it was $100). It's some kind of LG with Android 2.2. It gets it done and it's really cheap. I would highly recommend it as a way to save $50/month vs Verizon.

UNIX was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things. -- Doug Gwyn

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