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The European Commission Is Preparing a Frontal Attack On the Hyperlink ( 220

An anonymous reader writes: Julia Reda, a member of the European parliament, is sounding the alarm on new copyright legislation under development. She says the European Commission is considering copyright protection for hyperlinking. Reda says, "This idea flies in the face of both existing interpretation and spirit of the law as well as common sense. Each weblink would become a legal landmine and would allow press publishers to hold every single actor on the Internet liable." Under this scheme, simply linking to copyrighted material would be legally considered "providing access," and thus require explicit permission of the rightsholder. Reda warns that it could lead to legal expenses for anyone who shares links (read: everybody), and ultimately the fragmentation of the internet.

Comment They have a point (Score 3, Insightful) 294

As a software developer I have multiple times had a development box screwed over by an IT department pushing unneeded drivers and patches that cause problems. I say prove they are good or needed before you waste other peoples time. If you just want to push any random patch that comes along then you should be forced to resolve all issues without the traditional reinstall the machine.

Submission + - SPAM: Keystone foes study how to be arrested if oil pipeline gets OK

Mitoungrtez writes: WASHINGTON — Donny Williams didn’t spend his weekend in Washington walking around the Tidal Basin taking in the cherry blossoms. He was training people how to get arrested.

Williams, a 36-year-old environmental activist from Baltimore, taught a class in the nation’s capital on civil disobedience, part of a last-ditch campaign against the Keystone XL pipeline, which critics view as a threat to the climate.

The sessions were held over the past two weekends in eight cities, including Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. While critics say they remain hopeful that President Barack Obama will reject Keystone, the tutorials anticipate that a State Department-led review will find the project to be in the nation’s interest to build.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - How do you revoke and re-issue a biometric credential? (

technicalnotebook writes: An interesting thought to come out of all the media surrounding Heartbleed over the last week. What would happen if the main mechanism of authentication used today was biometric authentication... this is not something that could simply be revoked and re-issued if your credentials were compromised.

So I thought I would pose this to the brains trust that is Slashdot, what *could* we do if something similar to Heartbleed happened following the more mainstream adoption of biometric authentication (assuming that in certain cases the credentials were stored server-side rather than locally for verification).

Interesting puzzle to ponder (and I would love to hear Slashdotter's thoughts).

Submission + - First custom Rom for Samsung Galaxy S5 is out for users! (

hateman20 writes: Just after few days of release of the Samsung Galaxy S5, the one of senior member of XDA has brought a first custom Rom for Galaxy S5. The Rom is one of very popular one, Omega Rom. Built to give high performance and loaded with tons of new application, features and many advance utilities to improve the usability and customize the phone in own way. Visit the source link to read more and install this Rom.

Submission + - Rome 'Was Founded 200 Years Earlier Than Previously Thought' (

concertina226 writes: Archaeologists excavating Lapis Niger, an ancient shrine in the Roman Forum, have found a wall that predates Rome's official founding year of 753BC by up to two hundred years.

According to Italian newspaper Il Messagero, the wall was made from blocks of volcanic tuff, the product of volcanic eruptions, and was designed to channel water from the small river Spino, a tributary of The Tiber.

Near the remains of the wall, the archaeologists also found fragments of ceramic pottery and the remains of food in the form of grains.

"The examination of the ceramic material was crucial, allowing us today to fix the wall chronologically between the 9th century and the beginning of the 8th century," said Patricia Fortini, an archaeologist working for Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali di Roma Capitale, a state-funded organisation in charge of all historical, archaeological and artistic monuments found in Rome.

Submission + - Japan surpasses Kyoto Protocol emission target 1

AmiMoJo writes: Japan's environment minister says the country has surpassed the target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions that it pledged under the Kyoto Protocol on global warming. Japan had lowered emissions by a 5-year average of 8.4 percent in the 2012 financial year compared to 1990 levels, more than the 6-percent goal the country pledged under the Kyoto Protocol. The 2012 figures are significant as they include the first full year after the March 11th Tohoku earthquake disaster, during which no nuclear power was available.

Submission + - Netflix's Comcast deal boosts video speed (

lewisbasil writes: The data released Monday by Netflix Inc. may become another flash point in a debate about whether the Federal Communications Commission should draw up new rules to ensure that all online content providers are treated the same by Internet service providers.

How many Bavarian Illuminati does it take to screw in a lightbulb? Three: one to screw it in, and one to confuse the issue.