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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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+ - Celebrating Dungeons & Dragons' 40th Anniversary

Submitted by disconj
disconj (2727795) writes "With the 40th anniversary of the release of Dungeons & Dragons coming up this weekend, the Internet is ablaze with reflections on its legacy. Dave Ewalt gives an intro for the uninitiated. Ethan Gilsdorf explains how "all I need to know about life I learned from 'Dungeons & Dragons.'" Jon Peterson presents a video show-and-tell of rare artifacts from D&D's development. How did D&D change your life, and what will you be doing to celebrate this Sunday?"

+ - Earliest Version of Dungeons & Dragons on Display at Museum

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "This weekend the National Museum of Play in Rochester, NY, will display the earliest known version of the game Dungeons & Dragons as a part of their new exhibit Game Time! . The document is on loan from the personal collection of games historian Jon Peterson (author of Playing at the World ), who says the document "captures the system at around the midpoint of development, with the core concepts of dungeon exploration and fantastic combat in place, but it lacks some features of the mature game and exhibits a few intriguing variations." Some excerpts are up on Peterson's blog."

+ - Documentary to tell the story of the UK games industry

Submitted by necronom426
necronom426 (755113) writes "For those of us who grew up in the '80s there are many interesting tales of how the games industry developed. The UK has it's own set of unique stories, and two film makers are documenting it in their film From Bedrooms to Billions. If you had a Spectrum or C64, or get nostalgic if someone mentions Julian Rignall, Oliver Frey, Rob Hubbard, Andrew Braybrook, David Braben, Jon Hare, Jeff Minter, Matthew Smith, Martin Galway, Zzap!64, Crash, etc., then you might want to take a look."

+ - Google Fiber: Why Traditional ISPs Are Officially On Notice->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "A few years ago, when Google was determining which city to launch its pilot Google Fiber program, cities all over the country went all-out trying to persuade the search giant to bring all that fantastical bandwidth to their neck of the woods. And with good reason: Google Fiber offers gigabit Internet speeds and even TV service, all at prices that meet or beat the competition. In fact, the lowest tier of Google Fiber service (5Mbps down, 1Mbps up) is free, once users pay a $300 construction fee. If ISPs were concerned before, they should really start sweating it now. Although Google Fiber looked like it would whip traditional ISPs in every regard, with Time Warner Cable cutting prices and boosting speeds for users in Kansas City in a desperate attempt to keep them, surely other ISPs were hoping the pilot program would flame out. Now that Austin is happening, it’s clear that it’s only a matter of time before Google rolls out its service in many more cities. Further, this jump from legacy Internet speeds to gigabit-class service is not just about people wanting to download movies faster; it’s a sea change in what the Internet is really capable of."
Link to Original Source

+ - Opus - the codec to end all codecs-> 4

Submitted by
jmv
jmv writes "It's official. The Opus audio codec is now standardized by the IETF as RFC 6716. Opus is the first state-of-the-art, fully Free and Open audio codec ratified by a major standards organization. Better, Opus covers basically the entire audio-coding application space and manages to be as good or better than existing proprietary codecs over this whole space. Opus is the result of a collaboration between Xiph.Org, Mozilla, Microsoft (yes!), Broadcom, Octasic, and Google. See the Mozilla announcement and the Xiph.Org press release for more details."
Link to Original Source
Piracy

+ - MPAA Sends Out Anti-Piracy Propaganda to US Presidential Candidates->

Submitted by hypnosec
hypnosec (2231454) writes "MPAA is reportedly sending out a list of key points to the two frontrunner US presidential candidates and even to the folks at congress. The key “talking points” include words of praise for Hollywood and its contribution to the US economy and the thousands of jobs it brings along with it. The document also stresses that Hollywood brings technological innovation. Going back to its original points on copyright strategies, MPAA is trying to promote the need of new copyright protection strategies and need to open door for legislation similar to already shelved Stop Internet Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA)."
Link to Original Source
Books

+ - Playing at the World: A Huge New History of Gaming->

Submitted by disconj
disconj (2727795) writes "Over at Wired, Ethan Gilsdorf interviews Jon Peterson, author of the new book Playing at the World . Gilsdorf calls it 'a must read,' though he cautions it 'is not intended for a general audience. It’s a book for geeks, about geeks.' It is apparently an insanely-detailed history of role-playing games and wargames, including everything from Prussian kriegsspiel up to Dungeons & Dragons and the beginning of computer RPGs (but none of that heathen stuff after 1980). Peterson says in the interview that he wanted to write a history of these games 'worthy of the future they are creating.' He apparently spent five years on the project, including unearthing a huge trove of previously-unknown historical documents."
Link to Original Source

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