Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Article shows fundamental lack of understanding (Score 5, Insightful) 180

by disambiguated (#47916019) Attached to: Why Apple Should Open-Source Swift -- But Won't
You're both wrong/right. In order to supplant Objective-C, Swift would have to play well with the bazillion lines of Objective-C, and coexist with it for possibly a very long time. On the other hand, even if Apple "could not be more clear" that swift is built to supplant Objective-C, that doesn't mean it will succeed, and doesn't mean Apple won't change their mind. It's a gamble and they certainly know it. They keep that to themselves in order to encourage you to drink the cool-aid.

See also: Microsoft and .NET

Comment: Re:How do you measure the entropy of life? (Score 1) 211

by disambiguated (#47876123) Attached to: Information Theory Places New Limits On Origin of Life
"essence of life" is an interesting choice of words. Here, read this.

Here's a few choice quotes:

Although now rejected by mainstream science, vitalism has a long history...

Vitalism is no longer philosophically and scientifically viable...

By 1931, "Biologists have almost unanimously abandoned vitalism as an acknowledged belief."

Comment: Re:How do you measure the entropy of life? (Score 1) 211

by disambiguated (#47875699) Attached to: Information Theory Places New Limits On Origin of Life
Life is not one of the great scientific unknowns. Live and dead mice are not indistinguishable. No one today expects microbes to spontaneously come into being. Creating life from scratch is a technical problem, not a theoretical one. If stating so is pedantic then so be it.

Comment: Re:When can we stop selling party balloons (Score 2) 296

by disambiguated (#47869967) Attached to: WD Announces 8TB, 10TB Helium Hard Drives
I suppose it's going to be a while before we run out of alpha emitters. So the Wikipedia page is wrong then, when it says Helium is a finite resource. Last time I trust Wikipedia (yeah right:).

You said it slowly dissipates into space. That means the rate it leaves the atmosphere is low, so the rate it is replenished is low, and that's the limiting extraction rate.

According to this (that didn't take long), the rate Helium leaves the atmosphere is 50g/s, or 3e5 cm^3/s. The National Helium Reserve is 1e9 m^3. So, extracting all of the Helium from the atmosphere before it escapes, it would take 1e9 m^3 / (3e5 cm^3/s), or over 100 years to replace the reserves.

But extracting all of it is hopelessly unrealistic. I don't know, but it seems even 1% would be ambitious. So now we're looking at tens of thousands of years.

So either the national reserve is ridiculously large, or removing it from the atmosphere is not going to be a solution to the shortage. Right? Or am I missing something (else)?

Time sharing: The use of many people by the computer.

Working...