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Comment Re:Bias? Or reality? (Score 4, Interesting) 445

A lot of gifted programs, and this one is no exception, only partially rely on a test for selection decisions. They also rely on teacher recommendations to a large extent. And while I'm sympathetic to the view that you have to be able to pass the test if it's reasonable, I would be shocked if there were no bias in the teacher recommendation process.

Comment Clarity on Apple's products (Score 1) 508

I actually logged into Slashdot again for the first time in years to post on Apple's products:

The iPad Pro is the Surface done right, and I say this as much as I admire the Surface. Apple has copied liberally from MS; stylus, side-by-side windowing, folding keyboard, and it's done well. The keyboard eliminates the need for a kickstand, the stylus is good enough for artists and the 12" display means you don't need a laptop anymore along with the windowing improvements. Sucks for those who bought a MacBook.

The new iPhone finally has a resolution that is usable in low light. Apple has always had very good cameras on its iPhones and this takes it one step further. It's still a mobile camera with a tiny sensor and a fixed lens, but those have gotten very good in recent years. Not yet quite as good as Samsung S6, Motorola X Style, LG G4 or Sony Z5, but Apple is not usually about choice. The force touch is a very useful addition, but will be mostly useful for 3rd party apps, gaming etc. However, since the Huawei Mate S has it as well, it's only a matter of time before it's standard on all mobile platforms.

The new Apple TV that now offers an SDK for developers is something that will be extremely useful. The Apple TV is already the best device for screen sharing in terms of quality. It even works well with Windows with 3rd party AirSquirrel. The devkit will enable developers to make even more useful presentation tools, which is where the Apple TV really shines. For home, there are many other options that are just as useful.

Of course you would still be locked into Apple's ecosystem, which is the main reason I avoid Apple's iOS products.

Comment Re:Don't forget Firefox Hello! (Score 1) 147

Videoconferencing from any device on the planet without installing any special software is bloat?

YES, in the same way that every user on the planet would probably want a calculator once in a while but that doesn't mean the browser needs to add one!

Firefox comes with a couple of calculators built in. It has since before it was called Firefox.

Comment Re:No, you really havent avenged anything. (Score 5, Insightful) 1350

Unfortunately, Stephane Charbonnier is one of the people who were killed in this latest attack. I really hope you're right that Charlie Hebdo will keep going, but it's a lot easier to recover from physical damage to offices than it is from having the staff that make the magazine what it is killed. :(

Comment Re:What do they spend the money on? (Score 1) 161

Browsers are pretty complicated, yes. Things like low-latency high-performance VMs, hardware-accelerated video pipelines, plus the details, like actual HTML parsing, CSS layout, a network stack, and so forth. Also, what matters is not just the complication but how fast you're trying to change things, and people are adding new things (flexbox, more complicated CSS layout modes, mode DOM APIs, etc) faster than ever before.

But also, in addition to a browser Mozilla is working on FirefoxOS, which involves a whole separate bunch of developers, since it's not like the browser developers are writing things like the dialer app for FirefoxOS. Also, you need QA, not just developers.

And yes, Mozilla has 1000-ish employees, for what it's worth.

It's not just Mozilla. If I look at I see on the order of 600 committers with commits in the last month. And that's not even counting whoever is working on the non-open-source parts of Chrome. And not counting, again, QA and so forth.

And the worst part is, this is not a new development. Microsoft had over 1000 people working on IE6 in 1999, according to

So yes, browsers, complicated.

Comment Re:Chrome Soon? FireFox on the other-hand... (Score 1) 67

The "let" keyword is not the same thing as "let blocks" and "let expressions".

The keyword looks like this:

    let x = 5;

and is in ES6. A let block or let expression (neither of which is in ES6) looks like this:

    let (x = 5) alert(x);

so that "x" is only in scope for the duration of the let block. It's syntactic sugar for:

    let x = 5;

Comment Re:Chrome for Android and Safari for iOS? (Score 4, Informative) 74

> So, they're running Android and iOS on your
> computer to run the same binaries as those
> platforms?

No. "They" are allowing you to connect your Android or iOS device to your computer (likely via USB), then debugging the on-device browser using the Firefox debugger running on your computer. That way you're debugging the thing you actually want to debug, but using the same developer tools you're using for your other debugging, and which therefore you're already familiar with.

Comment What is the point? (Score 4, Insightful) 88

What was the point of Firefox? IE was free and was a proven and already well-established browser. By your logic, we never should have built Firefox and the Web should have stalled with IE6 in 2002.

The world needs a truly open mobile OS as much as it needed a truly open browser a decade ago. Android is open in name only and Google is hurriedly moving its most lucrative components into closed proprietary services and apps that aren't a part of open source Android. iOS is as closed as everything Apple does. Windows is getting some nice HTML5 support for apps, but not nearly enough. There's clearly an opportunity for HTML5 apps to compete on mobile if someone can build a solid alternative platform to the monopolies and silos we're all stuck with today.

The Macintosh is Xerox technology at its best.