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Comment: Re:Bad study - findings do not illustrate that at (Score 2) 297

by dfghjk (#48349393) Attached to: Study: Body Weight Heavily Influenced By Heritable Gut Microbes

"If two people grow up in the same house, are raised by the same parents, and exposed to the same food, it would naturally follow that they would develop the same gut microbes, regardless of their DNA."

That's why they compared identical twins to non-identical twins.

"If they actually wanted to study if gut microbes were influenced by DNA, they should have ALSO done the same study on the same number of adopted siblings, and compared them to the twins."

And that would improve the data over non-identical twins in what way?

Comment: Re:Oh no (Score 1) 297

by dfghjk (#48349357) Attached to: Study: Body Weight Heavily Influenced By Heritable Gut Microbes

"The only question is, "how much of a weight loss per reduced intake"."

That's not only NOT the "only question", it's not even the question that comes to mind. This is nothing more than doubling down on stupidity. ...and not that it's relevant here, but in some animals "gut microbes" do in fact generate energy. The issue here is not simply changing some conversion constant slightly in the equation that proves that fat people are inferior. Gut microbes can have a profound effect on how an individual behaves.

Comment: Re:I'm surrounded by morons (Score 1) 613

by dfghjk (#48292387) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Where Do You Stand on Daylight Saving Time?

"Nobody in their right mind is going to wake up one minute earlier than necessary before work."

Spoken like a high school kid who works at a burger place.

Adults with full lives do all sorts of things before the start of work and many jobs don't have set hours. Just because you roll out of bed without a minute to spare doesn't mean everyone does.

Comment: Re:Could be good if just for legal mumbo jumbo (Score 1) 136

by dfghjk (#48289871) Attached to: A Smart Electric Bike: Taking the Copenhagen Wheel Out For a Spin

But laws regulate the maximum wattage of electric motors for bicycles and their maximum speeds.

In many places you can ride a bicycle legally on a sidewalk. You don't want power-assisted bikes going 30 MPH on sidewalks mixed with pedestrians and you don't want people "sneaking around the laws" in order to enable this.

Comment: Re:rotating mass (Score 4, Interesting) 136

by dfghjk (#48289785) Attached to: A Smart Electric Bike: Taking the Copenhagen Wheel Out For a Spin

"I'd rather have a hub motor but have a small battery pack affixed elsewhere, maybe in a bottle cage, where it doesn't have to rotate."

It's not as big a penalty as you think. The weight is nearer the center of the wheel. This design has real packaging advantages over what you describe. It's also not new.

"20 MPH can be sustained by a fit rider who isn't elderly."

20 MPH can be sustained by a fit rider who is elderly.

Electric assist isn't needed for fit riders and bumping the speed to 25 MPH wouldn't make it better for its purpose. Bike commuters are not well served by devices designed to increase their riding speeds, they are well served by devices that expand the range for which cycling is practical. When commuting the goal isn't to ride as fast as you can, it is to arrive safely while interacting appropriately with traffic and hopefully not flat constantly while doing so.

I am also 52 years old and I have no problem sustaining 20 MPH in the flats. On my 9 mile one way commute, it is simply not possible for me to complete the ride in less than 30 minutes without a big tailwind. I do not need electric assist at my distances but others might. I could consider longer distances with assist, though, and my average speeds would improve even with the 20 MPH limitation. I have no desire to ride at high speeds on the shoulders with cars coming at me oblivious to my existence. I am forced to take emergency measures once every couple hundred miles typically. Safety is a far bigger issue than top speed.

Comment: Re:Right buddy... (Score 3, Informative) 365

by dfghjk (#48060487) Attached to: Object Oriented Linux Kernel With C++ Driver Support

I recently had to rewrite a modestly sized embedded project from C++ to C because it became clear that I could not afford the space for the mandatory libraries in the binary.

I did so by retaining the organizational concepts imposed by methods but made the implied "this" pointers explicit. I had to reorganize to undo the damage done by losing inheritance, virtual functions, etc. In a way, my biggest loss was losing overloading and templates. Those afforded elegant solutions that C doesn't match.

When I was done my source code actually shrank and my output binary size was cut in half. In no way could anyone argue that the code became less maintainable or less readable. Execution was notably faster and there was none of the god-awful unknown code executing that I had no control of. Exception handling is gone as is RTTI. Good riddance. I love some things in C++ but, on the whole, it is very burdensome.

Comment: Re:Why do people still care about C++ for kernel d (Score 1) 365

by dfghjk (#48060357) Attached to: Object Oriented Linux Kernel With C++ Driver Support

Abstractions aren't ever given to you. All code is written and abstractions can be accomplished in C just fine, thank you.

People seem to forget that C++ was originally developed as a preprocessor for C. Anyone who says things can be done in C++ but not in C has an existence proof to the contrary.

It's not just easy to follow standards, your tools have to follow them as well. Unlike C, C++ typically requires linking with mandatory libraries and those libraries mandate things like exception handling. Not everyone has the luxury or resources to fight such problems.

Comment: Re:Why do people still care about C++ for kernel d (Score 1) 365

by dfghjk (#48060327) Attached to: Object Oriented Linux Kernel With C++ Driver Support

Wow, what horrible observations.

Good thing C++ solved #define's, compiler optimizations, concurrency, interrupts and memory-mapped I/O! Such a difference that language makes.

Hidden mallocs, RTTI, exceptions, these are things that kernel programmers dream of...only not in a good way. ;)

Comment: Re:Misleading Article Summary (Score 1) 70

by dfghjk (#47958687) Attached to: Wanxiang May Give 2012's Fisker Karma a Relaunch

"The vehicle is purely electrically driven. It does have a petrol driven generator to top up the battery, but the engine is not involved in driving the wheels, so could easily be described as all-electric as you can rip out the engine and the car still drives."

Well you could rip out the batteries of a hybrid and it would still drive as well. Does that mean you could call a hybrid "all-gas"?

An electric drivetrain with a gas generator is a hybrid, not all-electric. It differs from other hybrid designs but that doesn't mean it isn't one.

You see but you do not observe. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes"

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