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Medicine

Cutting Umbilical Cord Early Eliminates Stem Cells 139

Posted by timothy
from the just-leave-it-on-a-few-years dept.
GeneralSoh writes "Delaying clamping the umbilical cord at birth may have far-reaching benefits for your baby, according to researchers at the University of South Florida's Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair — and should be delayed for at least a few minutes longer after birth. This new recommendation published in the most recent Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (14:3) notes that delaying clamping the umbilical cord allows more umbilical cord blood and crucial stem cells to transfer from mama to baby."
Piracy

Estimating Game Piracy More Accurately 459

Posted by Soulskill
from the arrrrbitrary-numbers dept.
An anonymous reader tips a post up at the Wolfire blog that attempts to pin down a reasonable figure for the amount of sales a game company loses due to piracy. We've commonly heard claims of piracy rates as high as 80-90%, but that clearly doesn't translate directly into lost sales. The article explains a better metric: going on a per-pirate basis rather than a per-download basis. Quoting: "iPhone game developers have also found that around 80% of their users are running pirated copies of their game (using jailbroken phones). This immediately struck me as odd — I suspected that most iPhone users had never even heard of 'jailbreaking.' I did a bit more research and found that my intuition was correct — only 5% of iPhones in the US are jailbroken. World-wide, the jailbreak statistics are highest in poor countries — but, unsurprisingly, iPhones are also much less common there. The highest estimate I've seen is that 10% of worldwide iPhones are jailbroken. Given that there are so few jailbroken phones, how can we explain that 80% of game copies are pirated? The answer is simple — the average pirate downloads a lot more games than the average customer buys. This means that even though games see that 80% of their copies are pirated, only 10% of their potential customers are pirates, which means they are losing at most 10% of their sales."
The Internet

Could We Beam Broadband Internet Into Iran? 541

Posted by timothy
from the extend-the-tubes dept.
abenamer writes "Some reporter at a recent White House press briefing just asked the White House press secretary, Robert Gibbs, this question: Was 'the White House....considering beaming broad capability into Iran via satellite so the opposition forces would be able to communicate with themselves and the outside world?' 'Gibbs said he didn't know such a thing was possible. (Is it?) But he said he would check on the technological feasibility and get back with an answer.' I'm not sure what the reporter meant by beaming broadband into Iran: Do they even have 3G? Would we bomb the Iranians with SIM cards that would allow them to get text messages from the VOA? Or somehow put up massive Wi-Fi transmitters from Iraq and beam it into Iran? How would you beam broadband into Iran?"
It's funny.  Laugh.

The Commodore 64 vs. the iPhone 3G S 238

Posted by timothy
from the next-week-chocolate-torte-vs.-charles-manson dept.
Harry writes "The unfortunate news about Apple rejecting a Commodore 64 emulator from the iPhone App Store inspired me to compare the C64 to the new iPhone 3G S, in more detail than any rational person is likely to compare them, ever again. If nothing else, it's a snapshot of just how far technology has come since the C64's release in August of 1982."
United States

+ - Budget Cuts and the Judicial System->

Submitted by
desinc
desinc writes "In Contra Costa County, California, some illegal activities are about to officially be swept under the rug. 'Misdemeanor crimes such as assaults, thefts and burglaries will no longer be prosecuted in Contra Costa County because of budget cuts, the county's top prosecutor said Tuesday.' What are the implications of local offices subjectively enforcing the law because they literally cannot afford not to?"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Best attribute (Score 1) 662

by desinc (#27260191) Attached to: Look Out, Firefox 3 — IE8 Is Back On Top For Now

Do you not remember the Slashdot CSS Redesign Contest?

http://meta.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/04/26/1512247

One of the requirements was that users submit an actual working copy of the site. They wanted it to work on most browsers, I don't remember it saying anything about being code-compliant or whatever other BS.

I assume they wanted this so they did could just take the code and implement it without any additional work. Most geeks are lazy, no?

Comment: One of My Experiences with the Police (Score 5, Interesting) 653

by desinc (#27161815) Attached to: Suspect Freed After Exposing Cop's Facebook Status

I was waiting patiently outside of a coffee shop with my puppy while my girlfriend was inside getting a couple White Mochas.

As I sat on the bench, two cops came and sat down right next to me. They were in the middle of a conversation, which I couldn't help but overhear.

Cop 1: "Why'd we arrest that guy again?"

Cop 2: "Man I don't even know!"

Cop 1: "Eh, whatever. He had it coming to him. They'll sort it out at the station."

You see but you do not observe. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes"

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