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Comment: Re:Power User? (Score 1) 321

by drinkypoo (#49795745) Attached to: The Tricky Road Ahead For Android Gets Even Trickier

Honest question, how do you directly modify your android OS due to the source code being available?

I don't. I indirectly enjoy the benefits: I am running SOKP on my Moto G. Before that, I ran similar AOKP-based Android releases on my Nexus 4 (before its digitizer and radio went tits up.) And before that, various community releases on my Xperia Play. In every case the rewards have been many and varied. These days I run ordinary kernels (no overclocking) and try to keep things simple.

The argument was over which phone was more like its desktop counterpart. Your argument applies equally to both platforms.

Is it just "hey look I can run top" or what?

Actually having a nice userland means being able to use your phone as a troubleshooting tool. You can actually do pretty well just by installing busybox (from the app, it's free, or there's some features you don't strictly need which won't cost you very much... or do it manually) and android terminal, as well as anysoftkeyboard plus the ssh layout, which you're going to want very much. But having the option to go Wayland one day means being able to recycle the phone, use it for other purposes. My oldest phone is now a clock and occasionally plays me some MP3s. It's not really worth selling.

Comment: Re:Just wondering (Score 2) 156

by Chas (#49795621) Attached to: Why Detecting Drones Is a Tough Gig

They are controlled by radio which can be detected.

Yes and no.

Some higher end models and drones allow you to record and re-execute a series of maneuvers. That pretty much destroys any possibility of interference with a remote controller.

So, you get measurements of the area you're going to attack.

Head out to a field and mark off a route.

Get a viable flight pattern down and record it.

Go out, setup, let the drone loose.

Execute the arranged flight flight path.

Walk away.

Comment: Re:Scientists are generally trusted (Score 2, Insightful) 221

by lgw (#49794189) Attached to: How a Scientist Fooled Millions With Bizarre Chocolate Diet Claims

More to the point, it's impossible to independently (& personally) verify the data and claims of everything that you would like verified. There's not enough time in the world.

Very true. The rational man realizes this, and doesn't hold strong political opinions on the rest of it. We're all going to be ignorant of most science in the modern world - the time has long passed when the educated man could know all of the scientific knowledge there was. It's important to therefore set arrogance aside, and not try to tell others they're idiots, or force your uneducated opinion on others by law, unless you actually care enough to do the diligence first.

Far too many people mistake fashion for education. If you're going to call others fools for trying to stop the teaching of "evolution" in schools, call them fools because you took the time to understand the science, the counter-arguments, and why a smart, ration person could somehow not believe in evolution. Until you understand the other side, and why it's wrong, stay out of the argument. For the evolution case: if you had a solid biology class, this takes just a few days of reading the talk.origins site. It's not an undue burden, and otherwise arrogance about your uninformed opinion is just idiocy.

For newer fields like the climate change debate, it will take longer to dig up the details, as there isn't a handy website that collects all the pro and con arguments. For climate change, can read through the pro and con sites and understand where they're coming from, understand the Vostok ice core data for perspective, spend time pondering the satellite temperature data, and so on.

For any such issue, treat both sides as intelligent people who are in earnest in their beliefs and not trolling, and read enough to understand how this can be true. When you understand how intelligent people can disagree on the issue, and see where both sides are coming from, then you can act out of knowledge instead of arrogance, and stop polluting the debate with idiocy. If your only basis for argument is "everyone knows the smart people believe X, and the losers believe not-X", well, that's fashion, not knowledge. This pretty much applies to anything being debated politically, BTW, not just the science stuff.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#49792799) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

That's not C++. That's "C with classes". (No true Scotsman uses C++ that way!) There should really be a new C standard that adds classes, C++-- or something. (BTW, a sure sign that people don't understand C++ is when they argue that the STL is slow.)

It's funny to hear game devs argue that C++ is too abstract, and then in the next breath wonder how they're ever going to get their code to use more than one core. I hope you're not that guy!

I'm in a different world. To me, performance means infinite horizontal scalability. Clarity and performance of work distribution across N machines (for arbitrary N) is where the fun is. Counting cycles and optimizing bytes got boring when machines got fast (a Raspberry Pi blows away the mainframes I started on).

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#49792719) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

Only catch exceptions that you can fix is the rule. If you can't actually do something useful about an exception, why would you catch it? There's nothing worse than Pokemon code!

catch(...) make perfect sense in one place - in main(), followed by logging the exception and terminating the process.

The whole point of this entire mindset is to stop checking for errors individually after each call. This lets you eliminate about 2/3s of your lines of code, all boilerplate, and reveal the actual business logic of each function by sweeping away the clutter. But there's a whole crowd of devs who like the clutter. They're not actually very good at coding, but mindless repetition they can do. This mindset is anathema to those guys. RAII without exceptions leaves half the clutter, and so doesn't achieve the goal.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#49792635) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

If you don't really need to make systems calls, that's absolutely the right answer IMO. I only favor C++ if I need to do platform-specific messing around with filesystem behavior, or low-level netcode. As soon as you need to do any sort of bit-twiddling, or you care at all about asymptotically-constant-time performance improvements, Java stops being useful (and I always prefer C# to Java where practical - same functionality with half as many lines of code).

I really don't see the point of using C (or C-style coding in C++) outside of kernel-mode stuff, however.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#49792569) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

A new hire from college is not a "beginner", at least not anywhere I've worked recently. If you choose to interview in C++, you had better know the basic STL classes (string, vector, map) as well. Sure, it's rare to see an interview question that would probe RAII/resource management for entry-level, but knowing that stuff coming in would really help. (We don't care what language someone is good in for an entry level job, but they have to demonstrate some depth in one language of their choice.)

Comment: Existing infrastructure vs no batteries installed (Score 1) 485

by Chas (#49791395) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage

Ah. I kinda don't see this happening anytime soon.

There are millions (perhaps tens of millions) of buildings across the country. All running AC.

Tesla's batteries are somewhat attractive, but still a *VERY* niche product.

I really don't see them gaining a realistically large enough foothold to force this sort of transition and the type of power system infrastructure changes it would require.

The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was.

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