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+ - SoftMaker sponsors a paid developer for Thunderbird->

Submitted by martin-k
martin-k (99343) writes "Mozilla Thunderbird is used by millions of people as the e-mail client of choice. Even after Mozilla cut back their support, usage worldwide has been rising and continues to grow. German office-suite developer SoftMaker has now announced that it will pay for a full-time developer to participate in the Thunderbird project and help the Thunderbird volunteer developers fix bugs and add features. First topics include CardDav support and a rewrite of Thunderbird's addressbook. Disclosure: The submitter is head of SoftMaker."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Why always Ubuntu on these boxes? (Score 1) 123

by deragon (#48950885) Attached to: Dell Continues Shipping Fresh Linux Laptops

Red Hat scurries away from consumer desktop market:

If Red Hat goes after some Desktop market, it is for specialized, corporate markets. Not for general consumers and surely not on laptop.

As for Canonical's resources, I guess they are split half and half between the server business and consumer business, the server business fuelling the consumer initiative. Currently they are focusing on the tablet / smartphone. Desktop is pretty largely pushed aside for the moment; this is obvious by the low quality (numerous bugs) of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Comment: Re:Why always Ubuntu on these boxes? (Score 1) 123

by deragon (#48948917) Attached to: Dell Continues Shipping Fresh Linux Laptops

Fedora LTS version is RHEL which is expensive, though they could install CentOS

But manly, it is a laptop and not a server they are selling. RedHat has never been interested in selling a desktop solution (just to contradict me, I believe that recently they have a workstation version comming up). Ubuntu is first and foremost concentrating on the Desktop experience. Steam supports Ubuntu, not Fedora. Ubuntu is what is closest to Windows and Mac as for support. It had wifi connection via GUI two years before Fedora got it.

And if you do not like Unity, you can try Gubuntu. It should look familliar to Fedora as it runs Gnome 3.

+ - Earth Gets Another Quasi-Moon 1

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "Astronomers have found a new asteroid, 2014 OL339, that is a quasi-moon of the Earth. Discovered accidentally earlier this year, the 150-meter asteroid has an orbit that is more elliptical than Earth's, but has a period of almost exactly one year. It isn't bound to Earth like a real moon, but displays apparent motion as if it did, making it one of several known quasi-moons."

Comment: Re:What's the angle? (Score 1) 35

by martenmickos (#47892887) Attached to: HP Buys Cloud Provider, Gets Marten Mickos To Head Its Cloud Division

Great question. We are seeing a lot of interest among enterprises to have AWS-like functionality in their own datacenters. And we also know that they are eager to use OpenStack. So at Eucalyptus we decided to do something about it. Here is my blog about the topic: https://www.eucalyptus.com/blog/2014/08/11/why-eucalyptus-keynoting-openstack-conference

Security

New Cridex Malware Copies Tactics From GameOver Zeus 18

Posted by samzenpus
from the imitation-is-the-sincerest-form-of-flattery dept.
Trailrunner7 writes The GameOver Zeus malware had a nice run for itself, making untold millions of dollars for its creators. But it was a run that ended with a multi-continent operation from law enforcement and security researchers to disassemble the infrastructure. Now researchers have identified a new variant of the Cridex malware that has adopted some of the techniques that made GOZ so successful in its day.

Researchers at IBM's X-Force research team have seen a new version of Cridex, which is also known as Bugat and Feodo, using some of the same techniques that GOZ used to such good effect. Specifically, the new strain of malware has adopted GOZ's penchant for using HTML injections, and the researchers say the technique is nearly identical to the way that GOZ handled it.

"There are two possible explanations for this. First, someone from the GOZ group could have moved to the Bugat team. This would not be the first time something like this has happened, which we've witnessed in other cases involving Zeus and Citadel; however, it is not very likely in this case since Bugat and GOZ are essentially competitors, while Zeus and Citadel are closely related. The second and more likely explanation is that the Bugat team could have analyzed and perhaps reversed the GOZ malware before copying the HTML injections that made GOZ so highly profitable for its operators," Etay Maor, a senior fraud prevention strategist at IBM, wrote in an analysis of the new malware.

+ - New Mars crater spotted in before-and-after pictures

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spotted a new crater on the surface of Mars, and, using before-and-after pictures, the impact date has been nailed down to less than a day — it happened on or about March 27, 2012. The crater is 50 meters or so in size, and surrounded by smaller craters that may have been caused by smaller impacts due to the incoming meteoroid breaking up. Several landslides were spotted in the area as well, possibly due to the shock wave of the impact."

+ - Astronomers determine the length of day of an exoplanet

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "Astronomers have just announced that the exoplanet Beta Pic b — a 10-Jupiter-mass world 60 light years away -— rotates in about 8 hours. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and exploiting the Doppler shift of light seen as the planet spins, they measured its rotation velocity as 28,000 mph. Making reasonable assumptions about the planet's size, that gives the length of its day. This is the first time such a measurement has been achieved for an exoplanet."

+ - Astronomer discovers nearby brown dwarf literally as cold as ice

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "Using data from the orbiting WISE and Spitzer infrared space telescopes, an astronomer has discovered a brown dwarf that is just 7.2 light years away, making it the seventh closest known interstellar object to the Sun. Not only that, it's cold ; its temperature is likely 240-260 Kelvin, well below the freezing point of water. It's literally as cold as ice."

+ - Earth-sized planet discovered in its star's habitable zone

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "Astronomers have announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a very nearly Earth-sized planet in its star's habitable zone. The planet is the fifth in a system of five orbiting a red dwarf star 500 light years away, and is located in the region where liquid water could exist on its surface. It's not know if this planet is Earth-like — that is, with water and air and the potential for life — but it's the closest we've yet seen where one could be like our own planet."

+ - Object seen in skydiver's helmetcam unlikely to be a meteorite 3

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "The viral video showing what looked like a meteorite falling past a skydiver made quite a splash, with many people assuming it was true. However, further analysis shows that it's also perfectly consistent with being a small (1-3 cm) rock that fell out of the parachute itself, which is a far more likely explanation."

Comment: Re:Ummm, probably not (Score 1) 142

by The Bad Astronomer (#46664743) Attached to: Skydiver's Helmet Cam Captures a Falling Meteor
That analysis was done here: http://norskmeteornettverk.no/... (it's not in English, but google translate does a decent job). He makes a distance estimate based on speed, which itself is based on the assumption it's a falling rock at terminal velocity. But the distance, speed, and time it takes to cross the FOV are related, and if you make a stab at speed you can get distance and vice versa.

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