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Comment: Re:viva9988 (Score 1) 175

It would make more sense to me if Ubisoft distributed a list of deactivated keys. Any genuinely legitimate business who has fielded and honored requests for replacement keys could then turn and sue Ubisoft for any moneies they were out as a result.

Strikes me as a whole lot more streamlined than trying to form a class action suit involving a completely unknown number of legitimate end users that might have been dinged by this.

Comment: Re:Remember the good old days? (Score 1) 346

by jc42 (#48910387) Attached to: Americans Support Mandatory Labeling of Food That Contains DNA

Remember when news organizations didn't so blatantly try to push agendas?

I can't remember that far back. It must've been well before the sinking of the USS Maine.

It must have been before recorded history. We have documented examples of such behavior for as long as we have documents.

Comment: Re:No it is a combo of 2 factors (Score 1) 346

by jc42 (#48910371) Attached to: Americans Support Mandatory Labeling of Food That Contains DNA

Precisely. The study asked a question that results in an expected answer 80% of the time. So why would such a study be conducted in the first place?

Well, duh, they did it to verify that the people did give the "expected" answer most of the time. There are lots of scientific studies showing that something the "everyone knows" isn't actually true, so such beliefs are often worth actually testing. In this case, a number for what fraction of the people haven't a clue about DNA is interesting and potentially useful. It does put a lot of other such surveys in an "interesting" light.

Comment: Re:What's the problem? (Score 1) 139

by gweihir (#48909189) Attached to: Secret Service Investigating Small Drone On White House Grounds

Clearly I was voicing _opinions_! You know, things people think may be right but do not claim as truth. Apparently you have problems with the concept. Attributes like "bullshit" or "nonsense" clearly mark opinions, not statements of fact.

You seem to have some rather serious problem interpreting what people say. I mean that not in the sense that I am trying to insult you, but in the sense that I detect an actual perception problem on your side. Maybe get that looked at, it could help you avoid serious misinterpretations of what people say on the future.

Comment: Re:Still sounds like early flight... (Score 1) 72

by gweihir (#48909129) Attached to: Germany Plans Highway Test Track For Self-Driving Cars

Indeed. Safe individual transportation would be a great boon. And it could revolutionize parts of public transportation in general. Example: Need to transport something heavier? Order a self-driving car of any size desired. Of course, the Taxi-industry will likely be a casualty of this, but no historical job-setting lasts forever.

Comment: Re:Oh Boy! (Score 2) 70

by gweihir (#48907793) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

That is not a PC. That is an embedded ARM system. And really, there is no problem with the PC industry. The days of growth are over, but that is _not_ a problem and everybody sane did expect it. A far smaller PC industry 20 years back managed to have several manufacturers for each component and several models for each and prices where comparably lower than today.

Comment: Re:Yeah, and all hacked (Score 1) 70

by gweihir (#48907775) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

The security problem is mostly solved. Or at least it is possibly and economically feasible to make breaking in prohibitively hard. The "cheapest bidder" and "Microsoft"/"Adobe"/etc. and "cheapest possible programmer" problems are not. For software to improve to acceptable levels of security, my guess would be that you would need to sack 95% of programmers and 95% of their bosses.

Comment: Re:What's the problem? (Score 1) 139

by gweihir (#48905665) Attached to: Secret Service Investigating Small Drone On White House Grounds

Bullshit. Any halfway competent engineer would have though of all that and made sure it does not happen. Really, you have no clue how professionals work.

A "less than halfway competent" attempt is no danger.

As for finding the drone being the intended effect, that makes only sense for a false-flag operation. It is a possibility, but there _still_ is no danger.

Really, stop being stupid. Stop spreading fear.

The number of UNIX installations has grown to 10, with more expected. -- The Unix Programmer's Manual, 2nd Edition, June 1972

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