Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:I just want the new Nexus. (Score 1) 222

There are three professions where being untruthful is the key to success: Lawyers, salespeople, and marketing. All three are hired to portray their client in the most favorable light possible, and the very best ones lie through their teeth. The worst of these three are the marketers because they have legions of psychologists and scientists trying to figure out the best way to lie to people.

Yes! You're both presenting a perfectly defensible argument against marketing and reinforcing my original point! Because geeks tend to abhor marketing, we dismiss its significance, and are perennially gobsmacked as to why an intrinsically emotional, manipulatable species is so susceptible to emotional manipulation.

So long as humanity is what it is, reason will only ever get you so far. You either need to blow the doors off with a staggeringly amazing thing, or come to terms with the fact that every single entity who might care about your thing has feelings, and bending those feelings in your favor can work wonders.

It's not all bad, though; emotional manipulation works under much the same constraints. Unless you're a Level 80 Snake Oil Salesman with a hat full of luck, you're going to have a very hard time making your thing last if it doesn't live up to the hype--and your reputation will suffer for it.

Comment: Re:I just want the new Nexus. (Score 5, Insightful) 222

The only real feature of note was Apple Pay, which might finally make NFC payments take off in the US. It's been a technology that should have hit it big a couple of years ago, but has never seen much consumer buy-in for some reason.

It's pretty straightforward, to my mind. With the exception of all but the most staggering technological advancements, widespread adoption of new technology typically requires:

  1. a sound implementation,
  2. a robust support infrastructure, and
  3. an effective marketing campaign.

Geeks, for a variety of reasons, tend to respect the first, grok the second, and abhor the third. I personally believe it's what drives our perpetual cycle of incredulity on this subject--because we so detest the last part of this equation, we refuse to see its importance in getting all those squishy, distracted, emotional bags of water to adopt cool new stuff.

NFC has never had the effective marketing campaign in the US, and only kinda had the support infrastructure. The iPhone has incredible inertia on the marketing front, and Apple have clearly done the legwork on building a good starting lineup of financial institutions and retailers for Apple Pay. It remains to be seen whether this'll be sufficient to make NFC catch on, but it's easily the closest we've come to covering all three of the bases above.

Comment: Re:I don't get it (Score 1) 535

by Rosco P. Coltrane (#47879065) Attached to: Cuba Calculates Cost of 54yr US Embargo At $1.1 Trillion

Cuban cigar smokers in the US don't have a PAC to push through changes. They're just not a big enough special interest group.

Rich people can get Cuban cigars without any problem whatsoever, embargo or not. Hell, JFK smoked Havanas during the Cuban missile crisis.

Normal rules and laws don't apply to the one percentile...

Comment: Re:How? (Score 0, Flamebait) 364

by Rosco P. Coltrane (#47870719) Attached to: Text While Driving In Long Island and Have Your Phone Disabled

How to distinguish whether the phone user is driving a car or riding a bus?

At least you can exclude all iPhone owners from that particular test: people who can afford Apple products are so not riding busses... Or if they do, they probably know better than to whip out a multi-hundred-dollar device begging to be stolen onboard the bus.

Comment: Re:difference between driver and passenger? (Score 5, Interesting) 364

by Rosco P. Coltrane (#47870661) Attached to: Text While Driving In Long Island and Have Your Phone Disabled

I suppose the same way PawSense detects whether a cat or a human is using the device: when you text and drive, you have a funny way of using the device - because you're constantly switching between texting, putting down the device and driving, picking it back up after 10 seconds, and doing that over and over, as opposed to a human that's fully committed to the task of inputting text.

Comment: Not surprised (Score 0) 115

by BCW2 (#47764711) Attached to: Statistics Losing Ground To CS, Losing Image Among Students
Statistics as taught in it's current form (just like economics) came about in the 50's, they were both designed by out of work mathematicians. Now to an unemployed Math PHD in the 50's with the start of the space program and the massive military research programs, how good were these guys? When I took Stat in college I was amazed. Take one set of data and produce two diametrically opposed answers and have them both correct? Sounds like rumor, gossip, and BS to me, not science.
No wonder there are lies, damn lies, and statistics!

"Say yur prayers, yuh flea-pickin' varmint!" -- Yosemite Sam

Working...