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+ - How a 3D Printer Let a Dog Run for the First Time->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Ever since 3-D printing began to enter the mainstream, people have discussed the technology’s potential for building prosthetic arms and legs for human beings. But what about doing the same for dogs? In one of those videos that ends up circulated endlessly on the Internet, a dog named Derby, born with a congenital deformity that deprived him of front paws, is outfitted with a pair of 3-D-printed prosthetics. With those "legs" in place, the dog can run for the first time, at a pretty good clip. Both the prosthetics and the video were produced by 3D Systems, which builds 3-D printers, and it seems likely that other 3-D-printing companies will explore the possibility of printing off parts for pets. And while the idea of a cyborg pooch is heartwarming, it will be interesting to see how 3D printers will continue to advance the realm of human prosthetics, which have become increasingly sophisticated over the past decade."
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Comment: Is there any protection against SMB worm ? (Score 1) 73

by Taco Cowboy (#48640023) Attached to: Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

Hacking activities are happening around us, from companies managing parking garages to Sony to Staples to whatnots ...

I've read Schneier's article which in essence telling us that there is no foolproof way to prevent hacking attempt

I do reckoned that "foolproof" in the IT field is nothing short of fairy tales, but still, I do think there ought to be ways, online and offline, that we can do, to at least cut down, to minimize, our companies' exposure to the (oft state-sponsored) hacking groups

Any link (or links), suggestion, recommendation, whatever, that you guys (and gals) can share?

Thanks !

+ - Warblers Hear Tornadoes Coming from Hundreds of Miles Away

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Osvaldo Nunez reports that a recent study out of UC Berkeley says that golden-winged warblers can predict the coming of storms and tornadoes while the closest tornado is still hundreds of miles away. In April, a massive thunderstorm ravaged central and southern United States, causing more than $1 billion in damage across 17 states. The birds nest and breed around the Great Lakes and the Appalachian Mountains every summer. After flying 1,500-miles down to Tennessee, two days before the storms, flocks of songbirds and golden-winged warblers departed the areas and flew 900-miles to Florida and Cuba. They escaped just south of the tornadoes' path — and then went straight home again. By May 2, five tagged birds were back in their nesting area. "At the same time that meteorologists on The Weather Channel were telling us this storm was headed in our direction, the birds were apparently already packing their bags and evacuating the area," says Henry Streby.

The most likely tip-off was the deep rumble that tornadoes produce, well below what humans can hear. Noise in this "infrasound" range travels thousands of kilometers, and may serve as something of an early warning system for animals that can pick it up. "It's very unlikely that this species is the only group doing this," says Streby. The new study is the first time that migratory birds have been seen taking such dramatic evasive action. "We know that birds can alter their route to avoid things during regular migration. But it hadn't been shown before that they would leave once the migration is over, and they'd established their breeding territory, to escape severe weather." With the predicted increase in severity and frequency of similar storms as anthropogenic climate change progresses, understanding large-scale behavioral responses of animals to such events will be an important objective of future research."

Comment: Re:$32 million of greed. (Score 1) 107

by hey! (#48639471) Attached to: Calculus Textbook Author James Stewart Has Died

I have a friend who was a medical entomologist and journal editor before he retired. I ran into him while I was browsing a book table at a conference, and mentioned that I'd like to buy one of the medical entomology textbooks but the $250 price tag was a bit steep.

"Just wait," he said. "I'm about to change that. I'm writing a new textbook that will be a lot cheaper. I want students and public health departments to be able to afford a solid medical entomology reference."

When his book came out the publisher set the priced at $500. It was twice as expensive any of its competitors. Now something like this is never going to sell like a basic calculus book, but it has a considerably larger market than you'd think. His idea was that it would find its way into the syllabus in medical, veterinary and public health schools; and that hospitals and public health agencies would buy copies for their libraries. But his strategy to make that happen by making the book affordable and sell in (relatively) high numbers; the publisher had other plans.

So don't blame authors for high textbook prices. It's publishers who set the price.

Comment: Re:3 minutes is slow? (Score 2) 97

by TWX (#48639379) Attached to: Tesla About To Start Battery-Swap Pilot Program
Well, it used to be common for gas stations to also have vehicle service bays for back when cars were a lot more finicky and in need of regular tuning, and part of that was the oil-change pit. Maybe those remaining stations with that setup will find that it's a good market to do electric car battery swaps with the old pits.

+ - New data says volcanoes, not asteroids, killed dinosaurs

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "The uncertainty of science: A careful updating of the geological timeline has strengthened the link between the dinosaur extinction 66 million years ago and a major volcanic event at that time.

A primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps, which were once three times larger than France, began its main phase of eruptions roughly 250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene, or K-Pg, extinction event, the researchers report in the journal Science. For the next 750,000 years, the volcanoes unleashed more than 1.1 million cubic kilometers (264,000 cubic miles) of lava. The main phase of eruptions comprised about 80-90 percent of the total volume of the Deccan Traps’ lava flow and followed a substantially weaker first phase that began about 1 million years earlier.

The results support the idea that the Deccan Traps played a role in the K-Pg extinction, and challenge the dominant theory that a meteorite impact near present-day Chicxulub, Mexico, was the sole cause of the extinction. The researchers suggest that the Deccan Traps eruptions and the Chicxulub impact need to be considered together when studying and modeling the K-Pg extinction event.

The general public might not know it, but the only ones in the field of dinosaur research that have said the asteroid was the sole cause of the extinction have been planetary scientists."

Comment: Re:Why do these reaction wheels keep failing? (Score 1) 27

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48638705) Attached to: Kepler Makes First Exoplanet Discovery After Mission Reboot
All you're saying is true, but I think we've had enough problems with space-based moving parts (the assorted reaction wheels, Voyager 1 and 2 scan platforms etc.) compared to non-moving parts that finding a reasonable solution to this problem seems like something that everyone could benefit from. If a number of long-distance scientific missions have all the components working with the exception of moving parts, it would appear that moving parts with long lifetimes are the next major problem to solve. Voyagers had problems early on. That made the scientific output from Voyager 2 diminished even before it got to Uranus and Neptune. It's not just about extended missions in some cases.

Man will never fly. Space travel is merely a dream. All aspirin is alike.

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