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Submission + - IBM buys Dallas based Softlayer for $2bil (

An anonymous reader writes: IBM this morning announced a deal to acquire the Dallas based hosting company Softlayer, the largest privately held cloud computing provider in the world. Formerly known as The Planet, they have a dark past and hopefully a bright future. Interesting that ISS and Softlayer will now be under the same roof.

Submission + - New Facebook App Automates Friend-Stalking 2

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "PC Magazine reports that a new app called "Breakup Notifier" lets you select people on your friends list whose relationships are of critical interest to your daily life and should any of their relationships change, for better or for worse, you'll get an email referencing the friend and the specific change made. "A few days ago, my fiancee and her mom were talking about setting up a nice guy with my fiancee's sister. Unfortunately, said guy is in a relationship. My mother-in-law to be suggested it would be nice to know when the relationship was over (jokingly)," says app creator Dan Loewenherz. "I blurted out that I could make something that could do that in a couple of hours. By then, I knew I had to do it." The application, built using Django and the Facebook Graph API, polls Facebook every 24 hours to detect relationship changes and Google's app engine powers the mailing portion of the application. "Seriously, this is mostly a joke," writes Lowenherz. "But enjoy, if you do choose to use it for real.""

Submission + - A year later: Has Oracle ruined or saved Sun? ( 1

GMGruman writes: Oracle has steadily provoked the open source community since its acquisition of Sun, and calling into question whether the move will simply destroy Sun. But as Paul Krill observes, Oracle has been steadfast in upgrading Sun-derived technologies — and making them profitable, which should mean they will stick around a long time.

Submission + - People in 'Party Cities' Lose More Phones? (

wiredmikey writes: According a recent survey, Miami is the city with the highest rate of cell phone loss or theft against the 20 most populated cities in the U.S, with 52% of respondents saying they have experienced cell phone loss or theft. New York and Los Angeles were the #2 and #3 cities in the survey with 49 and 44 percent of respondents experiencing loss/theft respectively.

Is it me, or do Miami, New York and Los Angeles have the reputation of big time party cities? Any correlation here? I’m thinking that many of these missing mobile phones have ended up under cushions of posh couches at South Beach night clubs or left in the back seat of a cab on the way to an after party. But how is Las Vegas not in the Top 20 List? Perhaps people know better and don't even take their phones out with them?

Unfortunately, the survey also revealed that 87 percent of respondents could neither remotely lock nor remotely wipe their phone's memory afterwards and more than half (54 percent) of all smartphone users did not password protect their phones. Yikes.


Submission + - NASA's Ares 1 to Be Reborn as the Liberty Commerci ( 1

MarkWhittington writes: When President Barack Obama canceled the Constellation space exploration program, it was thought the Ares 1, the much-maligned planned rocket that would have launched the Orion into low Earth orbit, was dead and gone.

However, it looks like ATK, the aerospace firm that manufactures solid rocket boosters for NASA, has entered into a joint venture with Astrium, the European firm that builds the Ariane V to build a commercial version of the Ares 1.

The brain is a wonderful organ; it starts working the moment you get up in the morning, and does not stop until you get to work.