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Submission + - Google OS Announced 12

shystershep writes: "Rumors have been floating around for years that Google was planning an OS to compete with Window. As of Tuesday night, it is official: "So today, we're announcing a new project that's a natural extension of Google Chrome — the Google Chrome Operating System. It's our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be. Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks. Later this year we will open-source its code, and netbooks running Google Chrome OS will be available for consumers in the second half of 2010." It is separate from the Android mobile OS, will run on both x86 and ARM processors, and is aimed primarily at web use. Other than that, details are scarce."

Comment Re:well (Score 2, Insightful) 609

Personally, I'd avoid wikipedia math articles. They start out basic, but quickly get much deeper than he wants. Attempting to actually /learn/ the basics from them is doomed. When a person who is relearning math looks for the distance formula, they want the 2d formula, not it generalized to n dimensions.

Submission + - Linux Network Access per User 1

Anonymous Coward writes: "I'd like to offer shell access to my users, but have been surprised at the lack of restrictions that I can place on them. Disk space quotas are trivial. But what about bandwidth quotas? What about allowing listening but not outgoing sockets, or perhaps the other way around? Disallowing net access for certain groups? I've found no way to do these things, and the 'ports over 1024' restriction for regular users simply doesn't cut it these days.

I should think that my users could be allowed to run their own server programs if so desired without being allowed to run rampant. It seems that I can either block >1024 incoming at the firewall, or let it be abused.

What would you do?"

Submission + - Algorithm That Seemlesly Patches Holes in Images (

Beetle B. writes: "From the site:

'What can you do with a million images? In this paper we present a new image completion algorithm powered by a huge database of photographs gathered from the Web. The algorithm patches up holes in images by finding similar image regions in the database that are not only seamless but also semantically valid. Our chief insight is that while the space of images is effectively infinite, the space of semantically differentiable scenes is actually not that large. For many image completion tasks we are able to find similar scenes which contain image fragments that will convincingly complete the image. Our algorithm is entirely data-driven, requiring no annotations or labelling by the user. Unlike existing image completion methods, our algorithm can generate a diverse set of image completions and we allow users to select among them. We demonstrate the superiority of our algorithm over existing image completion approaches.'

English translation: The algorithm replaces arbitrarily shaped blank areas in an image with portions of images from a huge catalog in a totally seamless manner."

United States

Submission + - Highway 35W Collapses into Mississippi (

dcapel writes: "In what has been called the worst engineering disaster in decades, a bridge of highway 35W, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, has collapsed into the Mississippi. The collapse took place during late rush-hour traffic, so an estimated 50 cars were on the bridge at the time. There is no evidence for terrorist involvement, but an engineering or safety flaw of immense proportions must have been involved. As someone who was working only blocks away at the time, this happened entirely too close to home."

Submission + - lzma compression file format ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: The guys at The Tukaani Project are developing a new compression program (similar to older gzip/bzip2) and a library (with a zlib-like API) based on the LZMA compression alghoritm of Igor Pavlov. Some features of the LZMA alghoritm are:
  • Average compression ratio of LZMA is about 30% better than that of gzip, and 15% better than that of bzip2.
  • Decompression speed is only little slower than that of gzip, being two to five times faster than bzip2.
  • In fast mode, compresses faster than bzip2 with a comparable compression ratio.
  • Very similar command line interface than what gzip and bzip2 have.
  • Free software licensed under the GNU GPL (actually most parts are under the GNU LGPL).
The first draft of the new .lzma file format specification is out and the developers are requesting feedback:
There are also the experimental LZMA utils available for download at:


Submission + - .. this software has bugs.

no@bo.dy writes: I know of a pretty heavy bug (causes a crash) in very popular software which affects thousands of users. As I am a software developer myself I have found out why exactly it crashes (off-by-one error). I also know how to work around it, but the 'fix' is too complicated for the majority of users. The developer (big company) doesn't have a web form nor email address for bug reporting. I could send it to their 'technical support' or use a forum, but the success to have the bug fixed that way has proven to be marginal. The hardest thing is that the company doesn't give any sort of feedback about accepted bugs or their status. The bug has already been reported many times through the available channels, but I don't even know whether they are aware of it (may have been overlooked etc). How do I best tell the developer? What are my options (besides of making all relevant data public and hoping that the public pressure will force the company to fix it). Thanks.
The Internet

Submission + - WebKit gets a new Web Inspector (

Xenon writes: "As some of you saw last week at WWDC, we have a brand new version of the Web Inspector. We know that a lot people have found the current Web Inspector useful, and we have gotten a lot of feedback and sugestions about how to make it even better. And boy have we been listening! We have taken the current Web Inspector and have added a bunch of new features that you will find invaluable for web development."

Marvin Minsky On AI 231

An anonymous reader writes "In a three-part Dr. Dobbs podcast, AI pioneer and MIT professor Marvin Minsky examines the failures of AI research and lays out directions for future developments in the field. In part 1, 'It's 2001. Where's HAL?' he looks at the unfulfilled promises of artificial intelligence. In part 2 and in part 3 he offers hope that real progress is in the offing. With this talk from Minsky, Congressional testimony on the digital future from Tim Berners-Lee, life-extension evangelization from Ray Kurzweil, and Stephen Hawking planning to go into space, it seems like we may be on the verge of another AI or future-science bubble."
The Almighty Buck

Oracle to Buy Hyperion for $3.3 Billion 52

Oolala submitted an article that opens: "Business software maker Oracle Corp. will buy Hyperion Solutions Corp. for $3.3 billion in cash, renewing a shopping spree aimed at toppling rival SAP AG. The deal announced Thursday will give Oracle an arsenal of Hyperion products that are widely used by SAP's customers. Hyperion's tools, known as "business intelligence" software, help chief financial officers and other top corporate executives track their company's performance."

Randal Schwartz's Charges Expunged 219

After 13 years, Randal Schwartz has had his conviction expunged. In effect, legally it never happened. If you haven't heard about this one before, my take is that as a contractor at Intel, Randal did some over-zealous white-hat cracking free-of-charge; this embarrassed some people in management (he pointed out that their passwords were terrible) and management then chose to embarrass themselves further by having him convicted of a felony under an 'anti-hacking' law. More info can be had from the Friends of Randal Schwartz.


Submission + - FSF aims for partnership with hardware vendors

johnsu01 writes: "The Free Software Foundation has published a paper called, "The road to hardware free from restrictions". In the paper, they outline five major areas where hardware manufacturers can take action to create a mutually benificial relationship with the free software community: supporting free software drivers, ending the "Microsoft Tax" on new hardware, removing proprietary BIOS locks, supporting a free BIOS, and rejecting DRM. Their release puts the paper in context with Greg Kroah-Hartman's kernel driver announcement and Dell's recent request for customer feedback about improving their hardware."

Real Programs don't use shared text. Otherwise, how can they use functions for scratch space after they are finished calling them?