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Comment: Downloading = reviewing book in book store (Score 2) 156

by data64 (#35536284) Attached to: The 'Adventure' In Self-Publishing an IT Book
I have downloaded a lot of pdf and other files, only to delete them after 5 minutes because it was not what I was looking for or I did not like the style. Think of a download like someone picking up a book in a book store and looking through it. Sometimes it results in a sale, but usually not (at least in my case). One thing missing from comments is how good is the book that the author gave away for free. Can someone who has read it comment on this ? Just because a book has been written does not mean it automatically has to make money.

Comment: Re:Zapp Brannigan's Reporting Strategy (Score 1) 588

by data64 (#32889532) Attached to: Apple Censors Consumer Report iPhone4 Discussions

If I invite people to write on my car freely, and then selectively erase some of the stuff written to leave only the stuff I agree with, that's censorship.

It should be pointed out that according to that definition, deleting spam and obscene posts would also be considered censorship.

Comment: Re:Windows only (Score 1) 160

by data64 (#31400274) Attached to: Serious Apache Exploit Discovered

mod_isapi is a core module of the Apache package that implements the Internet Server extension API. The extension allows Apache to serve Internet Server extensions (ISAPI .dll modules) for Microsoft Windows based hosts.

So are you only vulnerable if you use ISAPI ? It does look like that module is enabled by default though. I wonder why ?

Security

Hardware Firewall On a USB Key 203

Posted by kdawson
from the bad-packets-stop-here dept.
An anonymous reader writes "An Israeli startup has squeezed a complete hardware firewall into a USB key. The 'Yoggie Pico' from Yoggie Systems runs Linux 2.6 along with 13 security applications on a 520MHz PXA270, an Intel processor typically used in high-end smartphones. The Pico works in conjunction with Windows XP or Vista drivers that hijack traffic at network layers 2-3, below the TCP/IP stack, and route it to USB, where the Yoggie analyzes and filters traffic at close-to-100Mbps wireline speeds. The device will hit big-box retailers in the US this month at a price of $180." Linux and Mac drivers are planned, according to the article.
Sci-Fi

+ - Indian made car running on compressed air is ready

Submitted by
Gary
Gary writes "The first commercial car to be powered by compressed air could be about to hit the production lines, as Indian automaker Tata Motors prepares to build ex-Formula One engineer Guy Nègre's design. The City Cat runs on nothing but compressed air — which can be refueled at "air stations," and overnight using a built-in compressor, it has a top speed of 68 mph and a range of 125 miles. The Air Car designers are working on a hybrid version that can compress air while it's operating, potentially making cross-India journeys possible."
Sony

Sony Sued for Blu-Ray Patent Violation 153

Posted by Zonk
from the how-shiny-is-too-shiny dept.
Jaidan writes "According to a Gamespot article, a California-based company named Target Technology is suing Sony over patents it allegedly holds for silver based reflective surfaces. The suit claims that products marketed under the Blu-ray name infringe on a patent it owns for reflective layer materials in optical discs. Target is seeking a permanent injunction preventing Sony from violating its patent rights in the future, as well as damages with interest, multiplied due to what it characterizes as deliberate and willful infringement. ' The patent addresses what Target called a need for specific types of silver-based alloys with the advantages (but not the price) of gold. According to the patent, the alloys are also more resistant to corrosion than pure silver. Target does not specify in its suit whether it believes all of Sony's Blu-ray discs infringe on its patent, or the suit applies to just a portion of the discs manufactured. The patent was filed in April of 2004 and granted in March of 2006.'"
Spam

Bye Bye Spam and Phishing with DKIM? 134

Posted by Zonk
from the teflon-for-your-mailbox dept.
ppadala writes "While research from PEW Internet (PDF) shows that few users really are bothered by spam, IETF is supporting a public key cryptographic based e-mail authentication mechanism called DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) Signatures . The new spec is supposed to help in fighting both spam and fraud. From Ars Technica: 'DKIM's precursor, DomainKeys, was originally developed by Yahoo. The specifications for DKIM were then extended by an informal group of IT organizations that included companies like Yahoo, Cisco, EarthLink, Microsoft, and VeriSign, among others. It was first submitted by the group to the IETF in mid-2005, but only recently published by the IETF. The spec is still to be incorporated into a more formal draft and submitted for approval, however.'"

Comcast trying to secure in-theater movies for on-demand. For $30-50 each.->

From feed by engfeed

Filed under: Home Entertainment

Oh, you're gonna love this one. So, those familiar with Steven Soderbergh's work know that last year he did a triple-release film called Bubble, which hit theaters, cable, and DVD all at once; definitely a novel idea for getting your media to as many people as possible -- but at what price would this become tantalizing for studios to consider it on a mass-consumer release, like Spidey 3? Comcast, which is working on securing movies currently in theaters for VOD, seems to think that it should cost $30-50 per screening. Per. Screening. Ok, considering some Pay-Per-View event prices, that's not unrealistic if you have a crowd over and charge admission (but we're fairly sure they'll also propose installing a webcam in every VOD user's home to count the eyeballs watching, and sue if it's more than a couple). But greater problems than large private showings face the model: the theater industry is positively fuming about the idea of simultaneous release, making all manner of threats against movie studios that are considering joining up. Don't worry though, somehow we have a feeling not too many people are going to go the BYOT (bring your own theater) method and lay down fifty friggin bones for some DRM laden one-shot viewing of a new movie.

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Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!


Link to Original Source

Scientists Attach Genes To Mini-chromosomes In Maize->

From feed by sdfeed
A team of scientists has discovered a way to create engineered mini-chromosomes in maize and attach genes to those mini-chromosomes. This discovery opens new possibilities for the development of crops that are multiply resistant to viruses, insects, fungi, bacteria and herbicides, and for the development of proteins and metabolites that can be used to treat human illnesses.
Link to Original Source

I've never been canoeing before, but I imagine there must be just a few simple heuristics you have to remember... Yes, don't fall out, and don't hit rocks.

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